Join Fountain Pen Geeks for a live broadcast / recording of our upcoming FPGeeks Podcast.

Hosts: Azizah Asgarali, Stephen Brown, Brian & Lisa Anderson

Live Broadcast: Saturday, June 8, 2013 at 8:00am Pacific
We’ll banter. We’ll brag. We’ll gawk.

We might even touch on an interesting topic or two, like pen repair do’s and don’ts! If you have questions for Brian please leave them in the comments below and we’ll try to answer them. Please keep in mind that this won’t be a how-to guide for repairing specific pens, but a general guideline for good practices to follow during pen repairs.

Brian will be able to answer questions regarding repairs of Vacumatics, Snorkels, Touchdowns, lever fillers, button fillers, nib straightening, some safeties and possibly a few others. Please hold onto your questions regarding pistons or Sheaffer Vac Fillers for another show.

Contact Us:
email: podcast@fpgeeks.com
phone: 415-685-GEEK (4335)
twitter: twitter.com/fpgeeks
facebook: facebook.com/fpgeeks
web: fpgeeks.com
forum: fpgeeks.com/forum

Mailing Address:
Fountain Pen Geeks
PO Box 728
Ankeny, IA 50021

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  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1314644695 Tracy Lee Crittenden Belford on Facebook

    I’ll be there! :-)

  • Kayte B

    My question for Brian is: After each refill in the TWSBI Diamond 580, what steps should you take and how do you do them (Try to explain if you can. . . )

    • Brian Anderson

      I’m not exactly sure what you mean by this, but if you are referring to cleaning it out, I would first and foremost state that taking the whole pen apart is not recommended. Yes, they give you the wrench to disassemble the pen, but it simply is not necessary as part of normal flushing and cleaning. Doing so only risks damaging the pen and I’d be willing to bet (although no empirical data to prove) that a lot of the cracked barrel stories everyone has heard about are partly due a result of people constantly disassembling their pen every time they change ink. Water and ammonia or a product like J.B.’s Perfect Pen Flush should be all you need to get it working good.

      • Kai S

        Yep, that how one of my TWSBI’s barrel cracked — even though I only took it apart once… :(

  • Kai S

    Nib straightening, please — in a recent accident, my Pilot VP slipped from my hands and dropped merely several inches, but the nib hit the desk and was bent like a beak. I straightened it the best I could with my fingers, but it’s just not perfectly straight even though it writes beautifully now. Any tips from Brian will be most gratefully received.

    • Brian Anderson

      Straightening a VP nib is tough as it is held on tightly, you would have to remove it to really get it straight, While I’ve not done it, getting it off would likely prove to be the hardest part. With a nib block, straightening would take minutes.

      • Kai S

        You’re right! I seems nearly impossible for amateurs like me to remove the nib from the nib unit. Since it’s writing nicely, I’ll just live with the aesthetic defect. Thank you Brian!

  • Dustin_Brown

    Is there a best kind of adhesive for attaching sacs? I’ve read about using nail polish, shellac or even rubber cement. Does it matter what filler system your repairing? For instance, would you use one type of adhesive when replacing the sac in a lever filler and a different type when replacing the sac in a Touchdown or Snorkel?

    • http://theinkednib.com/ Lee Smallwood

      Shellac. Gotta be shellac. rubber cement seems like a particularly bad idea.

      • Brian Anderson

        Agreed, Shellac always. Easy to get and is easily removable on any part you put it on.

        • Dustin_Brown

          Removable… Something I hadn’t thought about. How do remove shellac?

          • Brian Anderson

            Heat will soften it and then the part can come apart or you can wipe off the shellac.

  • Nibsterous

    Questions for Brian, and anyone else who will listen: 1: About
    straightening vintage gold nibs: can you demonstrate how civilians can
    try this at home over an open flame? 2: How about fixing fissures
    & cracks in vintage gold nibs with a trusty little soldering iron?
    (As you might guess, there have been serious casualties in my vintage
    squadron: safe tweaking guidelines would be great. Thanks!)

    • Brian Anderson

      Don’t use an open flame, ever. straightening nibs is done with a nib block and burnisher or with special pliers. For cracks, I wouldn’t recommend a soldering iron either, while I’ve never done it, there’s just too much risk of damaging the nib. I’ve heard tales of skilled jewelers working on nibs that ended up putting holes in the nib because they were not familiar or used to the properties of a nib. Most nibs are easily replaceable or can find a replacement relatively easily. If it is an exceptionally rare nib, then sending it out to be laser welded is the best option.

      • Nibsterous

        Thanks very much! Great info in the show as well. You guys are diriculous sweet!

  • Jeffrey Shy

    Is there any way to straighten warped feeds?

    • Brian Anderson

      If the feed is ebonite (hard rubber) then try heat from a heat gun. Hard rubber will naturally try to retain its shape, so heating will make it go back to its original state.

  • castlegem

    Excellent show!

  • A.J. Rosati

    I am a little bit new to restoring fountain pens. My father gave me a Sheaffer pen from around 1998 that looks to me like it may be a Triumph Imperial or something close. I know nothing about Sheaffer pens to begin with. The nib is very bent and looks to be ruined. I know it is an inlaid nib with a black section with a matte metal body and cap. Any idea where I could look for a replacement nib and section for this pen?

    • A.J. Rosati

      Thank you kind sir I will look her up!!

  • Eric Lowenthal

    I think that stephen was going to let us know what kind of lighted loop he found on Amazon. Any information on this?