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carpedavid
May 16th, 2010, 09:22 AM
http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1214/4611885310_1a06fcbc9c.jpg

I bet that if the devil ever asked you to sign a contract in blood, you could fool him by pulling out a fountain pen filled with J. Herbin 1670 anniversary ink. The color is called Rouge Hematite, after the mineral hematite, which derives its own name from the Greek word for blood. Justly so there's really no mistaking it this is the color of ink you'd expect to be filling Dracula's ink well.

Ghoulishness aside, 1670 is an utterly amazing dark red color with "earthy overtones" that J. Herbin developed to celebrate the 340th anniversary of the company. According to them, the ink is "a reminder of the historic color of the Herbin logo and the sealing wax used by the members of the royal courts." This description is particularly apt, for in a wet nib of any size, 1670 exhibits magnificent shading that evokes the highlights and shadows of an embossed wax seal. However, in a dry writing pen, 1670 displays another side of its personality, where the deep red gives way to dusky, orange highlights. As a result, this is one of the most complex inks I've had the pleasure of using.

1670 is highly saturated, and as a result is thicker than other J. Herbin inks. It's not quite at Noodler's ink levels of saturation, but it is close. Perhaps because of the viscosity of the ink, feathering is very low on all paper I tested it with, from the thin paper of a Moleskine cahier to the thick, absorbent paper of an Ecosystem notebook, to the reference-quality paper of a Rhodia bloc pad. Show-through on all of these papers was generally low, though it varies with the thickness of the paper; it was noticeable on the cahier paper, but not enough to be distracting. Bleed through, even with my very wet Lamy Studio, was nonexistent on everything except for the cahier, where it was present but minimal.

The drying time of 1670 is noticeably longer than other J. Herbin inks. On Rhodia paper, a wet line took between fifteen and twenty seconds to dry fully, whereas on the absorbent paper of my Ecosystem notebook, it was dry to the touch in about five seconds.

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3570/4611275231_f79a01098b.jpg

Surpassing the beautiful bottling of their other inks, 1670 comes in a very special 50ml bottle. It has a gold wax seal on the front of the bottle, and the cap has been dipped in a red wax that matches the color of the ink. I have two complaints about the bottle, despite its beauty. First, the neck of the bottle is extremely narrow. It would be difficult to fit anything much wider than a Lamy Safari through, and as a result it is definitely not conducive to being able to tip the bottle to get the last drop of ink out. Second, the wax on the cap is extremely fragile and prone to crumbling. I have read that the manufacturer is planning on rectifying this in future production, but as of now, expect it to start falling apart soon after you get the bottle.

Overall, J. Herbin 1670 is an amazing ink one that makes me excited to see what they will produce next. Though I've only had the bottle for a few days, it has already surpassed Iroshizuku Momiji as my favorite red ink. The color is dark and rich enough to be easily readable on both white and off white paper, and I see myself using it for much of my daily writing. Of any red ink that I've used, it is the best candidate for being business appropriate there is a certain gravitas to 1670 that its cousins lack.

I'd recommend picking up this limited edition ink while you can, as it is my understanding that J. Herbin is planning on producing this only during the anniversary year of 2010.

Review materials: For the wide strokes, I used a Lamy 1.9mm steel calligraphy nib on a Lamy Joy pen. For the fine strokes, I used a wet-writing, EF 14k gold Lamy nib on a Lamy Studio. The paper is Rhodia 80 gsm from a Rhodia Bloc No. 16 pad.

JohnCruzNg
May 17th, 2010, 02:38 PM
This is a very nice ink. Have you done a water test on it? Just curious to see how it holds up to some water.
I like that blood color it has.
Thanks for the review.

dannzeman
May 19th, 2010, 05:12 PM
Ok, I have one huge problem with your post: What makes you think the devil is a "him"?!

But seriously, great post! Loved the Dracula line. Your scanned image is fantastic. Well done on another thorough and comprehensive review.

carpedavid
June 1st, 2010, 05:27 AM
This is a very nice ink. Have you done a water test on it? Just curious to see how it holds up to some water.

Based on a quick test I just did, it gets pretty smear-y when splashed with water. I would not call it a waterproof (or even resistant) ink.

Trillium
September 12th, 2012, 03:55 PM
Great review! I have to say that I agree with everything you observed about J.Herbins 1670 Anniversary ink. I used it on some Tamoe River paper which is very lightweight yet durable paper. There was no bleedthrough using an Edison Fine nib or a Stipula 1.3mm stub ... this is an echoed sentiment, I realize, but what differs from the OP is that on Tamoe River, using the stub, there was a distinct metallic sheen to the areas of heaviest shading. Stunning effect! I can only hope that the upcoming 1670 Blue has some measure of this phenomenon!

writingrav
September 13th, 2012, 05:10 AM
Beautiful review of a beautiful ink...and probably my favorite. But it is no longer considered a Limited Edition. And seems to be of quite different character than the new 1670 Blue Ocean.

fountainpenkid
September 13th, 2012, 03:48 PM
Any way to find this ink...? I really ,really love the looks, but it appears nowhere :(

KrazyIvan
September 13th, 2012, 04:08 PM
Goulet's said they should have some soon.

fountainpenkid
November 12th, 2012, 04:20 PM
Jet pens has some!

ajzeller
November 14th, 2012, 12:03 AM
I also have it in stock (along with the 1670 Bleu Ocean) at The Zeller Writing Company. (http://www.ZellerWritingCompany.com)

jptech
December 26th, 2013, 08:04 AM
I just got a bottle for xmas, thanks wife.

I've been reading about the gold sheen, but I couldn't find any in my bottle.

AndyT
December 26th, 2013, 09:28 AM
According to the grapevine, it's been reformulated due to complaints about clogging at the expense of that sheen. Which is a pity.

mhosea
December 26th, 2013, 11:35 AM
Hearsay, but I read on FPN from someone who contacted them that they were planning to put the pigment back. Probably a no-win scenario for them. Both 1670 inks are nice in their own ways. The blue is care-free to use, but with an uninspired, dull color, whereas the red is high-maintenance, vibrant, and unique.

Jon Szanto
December 26th, 2013, 11:56 AM
Yep, any recent bottles (like in the last year or so) don't have the gold anymore. Which turns a problematic but unique ink into just another red. I'd certainly love to have the option to be careful with use and get something really cool in the bargain, but I'm not holding my breath.

Sinistral1
December 27th, 2013, 05:40 PM
So, I just ordered a bottle from Penboutique, along with a bottle of the Montblanc Jonathan Swift green and the new Montblanc Leonardo da Vinci chalk red. My sample from Goulet has bee-utiful gold sheen, are you saying that the bottle I'm getting now is without that??? I will be most disappointed if that is the case. Maybe someone knows the lot numbers (or other identifying number) that have the gold versus the ones that don't, so I can call them tomorrow to have them check it out.

Jon Szanto
December 27th, 2013, 05:51 PM
As I understand it, they changed formulas quite a while back, probably at least a year? Unless it is old stock, you won't be getting the gold sheen.

bogiesan
December 29th, 2013, 09:49 AM
Goo in the Hematite!
This is from a bottle of the first run. The metallic pigment, if left alone for a few hours, would settle out on the bottom of the bottle. A few weeks ago I noticed the metal was no longer on the bottom of the bottle but there were globs of stuff sticking to the inside walls. I dumped the bottle into an espresso filter basket and here's what I got. I do not know if this stuff is the congealed metallic pigment or mold or just goop.
(I hope the photo uploads properly, can't see it in the preview.)

david boise iD

Sinistral1
December 29th, 2013, 11:22 AM
Thanks for the warning. I changed my order to penboutique and took off the 1670 rouge hemitite. I'm planning on ordering it from Zeller pens tomorrow, since they specifically say theirs has the gold sheen formula. Hopefully they will have the "new" gold sheen formula and it will be goop free.

Sinistral1
December 30th, 2013, 04:04 PM
Having just read the last of the "Banned From FPN" thread and wanting to yell, "Stop it, please, my head is hurting"!, I thought I'd update those of you who have been wondering about the status of "the gold bits" in this ink. According to the man who answered the phone at Zeller Writing Co., they only stock what I call the 3rd formulation, which, according to him, has less gold than the 1st formulation but more gold than the 2nd formulation. See? Anyway, I wanted to make sure it had been removed from my Penboutique order before I ordered it from Zeller, but when I called Penboutique, I found that my Saturday call dropping the J Herbin 1670 Rouge Hemitite was taken by their weekend service and not relayed to their order people, so it had already been shipped with the rest of the original order. Dang. But, according to the woman I talked with, their last shipment of the ink was just received in November, so fingers crossed, it is the 3rd formulation and I'm going to get what I want. My friends and family are collectively shaking their heads and muttering, "Nyleen, why do you always make such a big deal out of these things"? They just don't understand, like you guys do. Sigh. Thanks for listening, and thanks, too, for, well, just being here and supporting me in this difficult transaction. Ciao.

VertOlive
December 30th, 2013, 06:37 PM
This has become a favorite ink. Used it on all of my Christmas cards. It has attained Buy-A-Bottle status on my list. Wondering who out there might have an original stash.....

cwent2
December 30th, 2013, 06:41 PM
This has become a favorite ink. Used it on all of my Christmas cards. It has attained Buy-A-Bottle status on my list. Wondering who out there might have an original stash.....

I do not have a stash - but I have a first generation bottle that once dried turns from red to a very golden sheen.

ac12
December 30th, 2013, 09:53 PM
This has become a favorite ink. Used it on all of my Christmas cards. It has attained Buy-A-Bottle status on my list. Wondering who out there might have an original stash.....

That is a neat idea.
I used Waterman Green out of a Lamy Pur with a 1.1 italic nib for my 2013 Christmas cards.
The 1670 sounds like it would look much better.

earthdawn
December 30th, 2013, 10:28 PM
No stash here either but I do indeed have an original bottle ....

One tasty ink for sure !

Sinistral1
January 3rd, 2014, 02:45 PM
Update:

The bottle of Rouge Hemitite arrived yesterday in -6 degrees temp (both Mont Blanc inks - JS seaweed green and Leonardo chalk red were frozen solid!). It was pretty cold, too, but not frozen. After giving it time to warm up, I tested it and my initial impression is that while it does have a gold sheen, it is not nearly as pronounced as my samples from Goulet were. It is still a very cool bottle and beautiful ink, and like the Mont Blancs, welcome additions to my ink collection.

KrazyIvan
January 3rd, 2014, 02:48 PM
Not that I do not like the Goulet Samples but for these types of inks, sometimes I think a sample can be off and may not represent the true color of the ink. The gold sheen comes from the gold stuff, whatever it is. If not mixed consistently when drawing ink for samples, they are going to vary.

AndyT
January 4th, 2014, 03:17 AM
Not that I do not like the Goulet Samples but for these types of inks, sometimes I think a sample can be off and may not represent the true color of the ink. The gold sheen comes from the gold stuff, whatever it is. If not mixed consistently when drawing ink for samples, they are going to vary.

Definitely. I don't go much on sheening inks usually, but for what it's worth my policy is to use a pen which is easy to strip down, and shake the bottle before filling.

heath
February 28th, 2014, 01:45 PM
Does anyone know if the sku is differnt between formulas? How do you know what you have?

Jon Szanto
February 28th, 2014, 01:54 PM
Does anyone know if the sku is differnt between formulas? How do you know what you have?

You can only tell by looking at the bottom of the bottle and seeing the gold sediment there. If you don't see it, it isn't there, and no amount of shaking will cause it to be anything but a red ink.

john
April 8th, 2014, 03:49 AM
I've bought a bottle of 1670 two weeks ago, I checked the bottom of the bottle and find some stuff stick on it. But when I try it , nothing else but red ink. So I add some gold sediment in it and write with dip pen. It looks great.

tandaina
April 8th, 2014, 07:10 AM
I got my old bottle back out because of this thread and inked it up. Dang I love this ink, and it does add such a lovely gold glisten to your pen's feed. I have never had it cause issues, adore it.