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gforce
April 29th, 2013, 12:14 PM
Hi:
can someone give me an idea of how to remove the nib and feed from a Waterman Phileas FP. I dropped it nib down and bent the nib. Has anyone tried removing the nib and feed? Does it pull out or does it screw out like an Esterbrook? Does it need to be pounded out? What worked for you? All ideas welcomed, thanks.
gforce

KrazyIvan
April 29th, 2013, 12:42 PM
This is what Richard Binder has to say about it. Not sure how old that information is.


Given that it’s possible to find new Phileas pens for $20.00 or so if you look in the right places, it turns out to be close. I’ve asked the Waterman/Parker/rOtring/Sensa service center in Janesville, Wisconsin, and the answer is that complete replacement nib section assemblies (not just the metal nib) are priced at $16.00 plus $5.00 for shipping and handling. My guess is that if you buy two, you won’t get hit with double shipping charges, so get all your friends together and make up a big order. Call toll free, 1-800-BEST-PEN (1-800-237-8736), and use your credit card.

A more generalized answer is that nibs are not standard. Each pen manufacturer decides on the shapes and sizes of its nibs, and whether the manufacturer makes the nibs or buys them from a nib maker, they are still unique to some extent. That said, there are many cases in which nibs can interchange; for example, all Bexley pens that use the larger of Bexley’s nib sizes can use each other’s nibs because Bexley is a small company and buys nibs in quantity for use in several pen models. This also applies to Visconti, Stipula, and nearly all small makers that buy from Bock or Schmidt, the two big German nib makers. Sheaffer, Parker, and Waterman, however, make their own nibs, and each pen model uses a nib that is unique to that model.

gforce
April 29th, 2013, 01:10 PM
Thanks Kivan:
But, right now those complete nibs are $30 plus shipping from Waterman. They can go for higher on the Bay, don't know why? When they can be had from Waterman for a lot less.
I think I paid $25 for that pen a number of years ago. I also want to see if I can repair this nib myself, so that's why I posted the thread about taking the nib apart. I am still curious if someone has had luck taking them apart.
gforce

KrazyIvan
April 29th, 2013, 01:31 PM
I have two of them and I have not been able to pull the nibs. One is the Demo and it has these metal tabs that I suspect hold everything in place.

Found this also:


You have to remove the feed because the nib is formed to it. But you can't remove the feed because there is a nipple where the cartridge is attached. This nipple is a separate piece from the feed, and even if you use a hollow core knock-out, it will destroy the nipple where it locks into the section. I've been trying to track down info on how to get around this. Haven't had luck so far.

recluse
April 29th, 2013, 11:14 PM
I don't own Phileas but I do have three Kulturs, which look like Phileas but in a cheaper clothing. Their feeds are not glued but the fit is rather tight and requires some efforts. I had a great success with this rubber underlining, which people put under carpets and such to prevent slipping. Nibs indeed are fit into the feed and cannot be pulled without taking the feed out.

TwelveDrawings
September 24th, 2013, 10:18 PM
I can assure you it is possible. The nib pulls straight out on a Phileas pen. I managed to repair a slightly bent nib. I describe my experience and offer some very specific instructions below (I am new to FPG, so if links pointing this website are forbidden, please let me know and I will not include any.)
http://www.fountainpennetwork.com/forum/index.php/topic/251212-can-these-phileas-nibs-be-repaired/
http://www.fountainpennetwork.com/forum/index.php/topic/251271-philias-nib-removal-and-repair-very-amateur/
Here is a link to a relevant YouTube video. It depicts a Kultur, but for what you want to do, the instructions apply. BTW, the video recommends lighter fluid as a solvent/lubricant. I just used warm soapy water and it worked fine.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gmJfkPoGKho&feature=player_embedded
Use your judgement and be aware there is an inherent risk in doing any work on your own pens. I did my test on a pen which, like yours, was already ruined. It now works! Good luck. — TwelveDrawings.com

Ordinarily I would not refer you to another site, but in this case the thread is too long to copy and paste here.


Hi:
can someone give me an idea of how to remove the nib and feed from a Waterman Phileas FP. I dropped it nib down and bent the nib. Has anyone tried removing the nib and feed? Does it pull out or does it screw out like an Esterbrook? Does it need to be pounded out? What worked for you? All ideas welcomed, thanks.
gforce

Ernst Bitterman
September 26th, 2013, 02:17 PM
I don't even resort to soapy water; water itself seems sufficient.

Given the nature of the construction, and this is true across C/C pens with non-threaded feeds, don't make a habit of pulling the thing apart; it's REALLY hard the first time, pretty easy the fifth, and after a certain number of repetitions (100? More? Less?) the point will just slide out when you turn the pen downward to write.

pencils+pens
September 26th, 2013, 08:48 PM
The Phileas should come apart the same way as the Kulture. From the SBRE Brown Disassembly Index (http://fpgeeks.com/forum/showthread.php/3250-Stephen-Brown-s-YouTube-Channel-Disassembly-Line), Waterman Kulture Disassembly (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zvf1Bz4ij2o).

"Remember, against the will of Hamish, there is no victory".

KrazyIvan
September 27th, 2013, 09:46 AM
Really hard the first time is right. Mine will not budge and I already went past the "This is too much force" threshold. Soaked and used that rubber material for extra grip. I can live without taking it apart.

TwelveDrawings
September 27th, 2013, 10:37 PM
Really hard the first time is right. Mine will not budge and I already went past the "This is too much force" threshold. Soaked and used that rubber material for extra grip. I can live without taking it apart.

It sounds like the removal process has slightly better than 50/50 success rate. I suspect the stubbornness comes from heavy deposits of dried ink. On new pens, the nib comes out with minor wiggling while pulling firmly. Older pens are less cooperative. Naturally, you can try an ultrasound cleaner. But I found several hot water soaks with several drops of soap (not detergent) did the trick. Good luck! --- TwelveDrawings.com

KrazyIvan
September 28th, 2013, 11:25 AM
Really hard the first time is right. Mine will not budge and I already went past the "This is too much force" threshold. Soaked and used that rubber material for extra grip. I can live without taking it apart.

It sounds like the removal process has slightly better than 50/50 success rate. I suspect the stubbornness comes from heavy deposits of dried ink. On new pens, the nib comes out with minor wiggling while pulling firmly. Older pens are less cooperative. Naturally, you can try an ultrasound cleaner. But I found several hot water soaks with several drops of soap (not detergent) did the trick. Good luck! --- TwelveDrawings.com

It's the demonstrator. The pen is clean. I wonder if gentle heat would help.

TwelveDrawings
September 28th, 2013, 01:50 PM
Really hard the first time is right. Mine will not budge and I already went past the "This is too much force" threshold. Soaked and used that rubber material for extra grip. I can live without taking it apart.

It sounds like the removal process has slightly better than 50/50 success rate. I suspect the stubbornness comes from heavy deposits of dried ink. On new pens, the nib comes out with minor wiggling while pulling firmly. Older pens are less cooperative. Naturally, you can try an ultrasound cleaner. But I found several hot water soaks with several drops of soap (not detergent) did the trick. Good luck! --- TwelveDrawings.com

It's the demonstrator. The pen is clean. I wonder if gentle heat would help.

I love the Phileas. It was originally a $20 "student" pen that somehow achieves the feel/performance of a much more expensive pen. Part of that is psychological (the brass insert inside the barrel adds a "hefty" feeling). Part of it must be superb Waterman engineers who refused to scrimp on the nib. I can afford better pens, but I prefer my trusty Phileas for everything from signing checks to creating my drawings.

Having praised it, what I am about to say is not a criticism. The Phileas is made out of a fairly plain (okay cheap) plastic. Unlike finer materials, the plastic scratches, gets hazy, breaks when stressed enough, and—when wedged tightly—it tends to stick to itself. I suspect this last trait may be what you are experiencing now.

You've already said you are fine with leaving the pen intact. If you get the itch to try again, you might add soap to your soak. It is a great lubricant and won't make the plastic hazy. Your idea of trying heat may result in some hazing because the plastic is simply not very high-grade.

Again, good luck. And enjoy your demonstrator. — www.TwelveDrawings.com

KrazyIvan
September 28th, 2013, 05:12 PM
I wanted to swap in a stub nib from a Waterman Harley but I'll just leave it. Well sort of. I'll just stub it.

TwelveDrawings
September 29th, 2013, 07:36 AM
I wanted to swap in a stub nib from a Waterman Harley but I'll just leave it. Well sort of. I'll just stub it.

I have heard second-hand that the Harley nib will work, but no first-hand accounts thus far. That's what's good about this forum—plenty of interesting rumors along with many interesting facts.

Chi Town
September 29th, 2013, 04:12 PM
That You tube video is quite the video! Asks far as showing how to separate the nib and feed!!

pajaro
April 19th, 2014, 02:05 PM
It really helps if the sction is cracked, then the nib and feed come out more easily. I bought one that has a cracked section, and I found a spare section, but it, too, was cracked. So I temporized by putting the Phileas nib in a translucent Kultur section and using that in the Phileas (RARE Phileas Demonstrator). The prices of these pens are going up, and $30 plus shipping for a nib, section and feed looks pretty good now. I'll give them a call.

Edit to add that these pens write so well that a certain cost like this to put a pen back in copasetic condition is not a bad thing.