PDA

View Full Version : M200 Demo + Vintage nib



Tony Rex
June 24th, 2013, 07:21 AM
I transplanted an old loose nib to my daughter's school pen with good result.

http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2837/9126123442_03952d2487.jpg

Best of both worlds.

http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3727/9123770687_291cf3e420_z.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/78772036@N07/9123770687/)
M200 14C nib (http://www.flickr.com/photos/78772036@N07/9123770687/) by Fides et Ratio (http://www.flickr.com/people/78772036@N07/), on Flickr

I hope you enjoy. Thanks for looking! :)

Edit:

More nib surgery pic, taken today.
http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3762/9442616162_4c0efa3d4f_z.jpg

Tony

KrazyIvan
June 24th, 2013, 11:29 AM
Do you mind posting the process used to replace the nib in that collar? I have been seeing some of those nibs for sale without the collar and have debated on whether I can replace the nib on one of my pens with it. I know ideally it is just easier to get the whole nib unit but I am looking to save some money and maybe pick up some new skills via the nib transplant process.

gentlyom
June 24th, 2013, 02:12 PM
Thanks for sharing. Beautiful pictures!!:thumb:

I did the same with my M200 nibs and the results are awesome. I think the process will definitely need a knockout block. Basically you will need to knock out the M200 nib, taking apart the nib from the feed and metal ring, then reassemble it back together with the replacement nib. Very simple process, but need to pay attention of the nib alignment. Hope this helps. :)

Tony Rex
June 25th, 2013, 12:21 AM
Darth Ivan,

It's pretty much what gentlyom said. It can be done without a knockout block, but much harder. It's really not for the faint hearted. It's easier to make a knockout block anyway, just make sure you drill a hole deep enough.

But before you do anything, measure the length from collar to tip and the length from the end of the feed to the tip... Then replicate those two numbers with the new nib. It won't be easy, and it's really easy to bent the nib, fins etc, because the force required with precission could be too fiddly for some. I put aside the stock nib just in case and had bought another from printhardcopy for this experiment. They're cheap enough I reckon. Small price for learning.

Tony

earthdawn
June 25th, 2013, 01:31 AM
Well done !!!

Looks great and sure looks like it writes like a dream as well.

After reading the process I have to say you got guts going for it. But if it wasn't hard then wheres the fun and gratification in it.

Congrats... she must be loving that pen even more now!

and thanks for sharing it with us.

KrazyIvan
June 25th, 2013, 09:55 AM
Darth Ivan,

It's pretty much what gentlyom said. It can be done without a knockout block, but much harder. It's really not for the faint hearted. It's easier to make a knockout block anyway, just make sure you drill a hole deep enough.

But before you do anything, measure the length from collar to tip and the length from the end of the feed to the tip... Then replicate those two numbers with the new nib. It won't be easy, and it's really easy to bent the nib, fins etc, because the force required with precission could be too fiddly for some. I put aside the stock nib just in case and had bought another from printhardcopy for this experiment. They're cheap enough I reckon. Small price for learning.

Tony

Thank you. I am good with fiddly, precision type things. :D I just wanted to be sure that it was just a knockout block that was needed.

gentlyom
June 25th, 2013, 02:17 PM
I suppose the process can be done without a knock out block, but accurate measure and close attention would be needed.

I do not have the hardware skill of making one on my own, so I went to fountain pen hospital in NYC and bought one (they also sell on the web). The cost is $40, which I thought is expensive at first. But as I went down to the business of replacing the nibs (modern to vintage), and fixing the nib alignment or the adjusting ink flow on my vintage and modern nibs, it became so much fun and the results are amazing. Now I will say that was money well spent, especially it has multiple holes that will fit most of the nibs. I did the knock-out on my Pelikan 200, 400, 140, 1005 nibs, they all worked! :)