PDA

View Full Version : More question about the Meisterstück Classique line of fountain pens.



InkyThoughts12
June 7th, 2014, 11:09 AM
As the thread's topic says I have even more questions about the montblanc meisterstück classique line. (Because I am a newbie to montblancs)

•Does the Meisterstück classique 146 have the screw cap or a slip cap?

•How do you insert the piston converter? screw in place or snap. (I wouldn't want to add pressure to a $500 fountain pen and watch the nib fly off the feed and nib section).
•does the Meisterstück classique have an ink window?

Thank you :)

gwgtaylor
June 7th, 2014, 11:14 AM
Classique could be a 144 snap cap with a piston converter or a newer 145 with a threaded cap and piston converter (formerly called Chopin then changed to classique when the 144 was discontinued) The converters of both pens are not threaded and push into place. No risk of nib flying. Pens are well built. No ink view on converter pens.

mmahany
June 7th, 2014, 11:25 AM
Classique could be a 144 snap cap with a piston converter or a newer 145 with a threaded cap and piston converter (formerly called Chopin then changed to classique when the 144 was discontinued) The converters of both pens are not threaded and push into place. No risk of nib flying. Pens are well built. No ink view on converter pens.

Older (25 years or so) had a push fit converter. All modern converters are threaded and screw into place. Other than that, everything you said was correct. To see how it's built. Go to Montblanc's website and search for model number 105181.

To supplement- The 146 is part of the "Le Grand" line of pens. The name is a working title (it's bigger).

gwgtaylor
June 7th, 2014, 11:26 AM
Oh really? Good to know. Thanks!

InkyThoughts12
June 7th, 2014, 11:31 AM
Classique could be a 144 snap cap with a piston converter or a newer 145 with a threaded cap and piston converter (formerly called Chopin then changed to classique when the 144 was discontinued) The converters of both pens are not threaded and push into place. No risk of nib flying. Pens are well built. No ink view on converter pens.

Older (25 years or so) had a push fit converter. All modern converters are threaded and screw into place. Other than that, everything you said was correct. To see how it's built. Go to Montblanc's website and search for model number 105181.

To supplement- The 146 is part of the "Le Grand" line of pens. The name is a working title (it's bigger).

But doesn't the le grand series use a piston filler, and piston fillers are really hard to clean, that's why I want a converter. Anyhow do you know the price of the meisterstuck 146?

Thanks

gwgtaylor
June 7th, 2014, 12:00 PM
Piston fillers are harder to clean yes. 146 has an integrated piston that is not user serviceable. If this is at all a concern for you the 145 is the way to go. I too prefer converters which is why the modern Duofold Centennial is my favourite pen.

mmahany
June 7th, 2014, 12:44 PM
But doesn't the le grand series use a piston filler, and piston fillers are really hard to clean, that's why I want a converter. Anyhow do you know the price of the meisterstuck 146?
Thanks
I’d argue that a cartridge/converter (C/C) pen takes longer to clean. With my piston fillers I can cycle a cleaning solution through it faster rather than having to let a C/C pen soak.

As far as the price of the 146. I’ll let you do your own homework as that’s easily accessible through Montblanc’s website.


Piston fillers are harder to clean yes. 146 has an integrated piston that is not user serviceable. If this is at all a concern for you the 145 is the way to go. I too prefer converters which is why the modern Duofold Centennial is my favourite pen.
Don’t forget the 147 which is identical in size to the 146 but utilizes a cartridge (but not a converter) for simplicity when you cannot take your inkwells with you, hence it’s name “The Traveler.” Another nice addition with the 147 is the leather travel case it comes with that protects the pen as well as up to 6 spare cartridges.



Of note: I've owned quite literally every Montblanc Meisterstuck model they offer on their website from the 114 Mozart all the way up to the 149 (yes, even the 166 highlighter/document marker), and I'm currently sitting in front of a 114, 144, 146 (two), 147 (two), 162, and 149(5).

EDITED: Thanks for catching that Jar. I meant to say "The 147 is identical in size to the 146."

orfew
June 7th, 2014, 03:27 PM
I too have several Meisterstuck pens. All of them are reliable writers. Speaking of the 147 though, I can highly recommend this pen if you do not mind a cartridge only pen. the case that comes with it holds the pen and 6 ink carts. The pen holds another 2 carts. I have never run out of ink with my 147. It is an excellent pen that does not get a lot of attention. It is the same size as the modern 146. The 146s of the 80's and before are smaller than the current model.

I would strongly recommend that you go to a MB boutique or authorized dealer and handle the different models before you purchase. This way you can check the pen for weight, balance and comfort. Also try the testers at the boutique, this will give you some idea as to the nib size you might prefer.

Chrissy
July 7th, 2014, 04:01 AM
As the thread's topic says I have even more questions about the montblanc meisterstück classique line. (Because I am a newbie to montblancs)

•Does the Meisterstück classique 146 have the screw cap or a slip cap?

The Classique 144 has a push fit cap and is a C/C filler but is no longer in production. The Classic 145 has a screw cap and is a C/C filler. The 146 (used to be called Le Grand) has a screw cap and is a piston filler. You can always tell these 3 pens apart by looking at the barrel and grip. The 144 has a gold band next to the nib and one in the centre where it unscrews to fit the cartridge or converter. The 145 has a gold band in the centre where it unscrews to fit the cartridge or converter. The 146 doesn't have a gold band next to the nib or in the centre and doesn't unscrew in the centre

•How do you insert the piston converter? screw in place or snap. (I wouldn't want to add pressure to a $500 fountain pen and watch the nib fly off the feed and nib section). Push in. It would be impossible to push a converter in and push the nib out as a result.

•does the Meisterstück classique have an ink window? No it doesn't. Only the 146 and the 149 have an ink window

Thank you :) Good luck finding the pen you want

Vokey
July 19th, 2014, 01:12 AM
As the thread's topic says I have even more questions about the montblanc meisterstück classique line. (Because I am a newbie to montblancs)

•Does the Meisterstück classique 146 have the screw cap or a slip cap?

•How do you insert the piston converter? screw in place or snap. (I wouldn't want to add pressure to a $500 fountain pen and watch the nib fly off the feed and nib section).
•does the Meisterstück classique have an ink window?

Thank you :)
Cap screws on.

Vokey
July 19th, 2014, 01:15 AM
As the thread's topic says I have even more questions about the montblanc meisterstück classique line. (Because I am a newbie to montblancs)

•Does the Meisterstück classique 146 have the screw cap or a slip cap?

•How do you insert the piston converter? screw in place or snap. (I wouldn't want to add pressure to a $500 fountain pen and watch the nib fly off the feed and nib section).
•does the Meisterstück classique have an ink window?

Thank you :)
Cap screws on.
Also, the converter screws in

Bling72
July 26th, 2014, 07:15 PM
I have the new Meisterstuck 90th Anniversary LeGrand Red Gold broad nib pen and this 146 is a deight to write with.

The ink resevoir is ample but I have been informed that if you keep a particular colour in
the pen for too long on the long term the resevoir window will change from clear to
that colour.

tandaina
July 26th, 2014, 08:59 PM
Converters *are* pistons. I don't find piston filling pens any harder to clean than a (piston filling) converter. I wouldn't buy a 144 because I wanted a converter. Now if you were certain you *only* wanted cartridges, no bottled ink, then a 144 would make sense. But frankly the modern 144 isn't in my experience worth the Montblanc name.

144 has a snap cap.
146 has a screw cap.

The 144 does *not* have an ink window. The 146 does.

No converter snaps in so hard that it will make a nib and feed fly off. Not even on a $5 pen. And $500 for a 144? Don't pay it. They aren't worth it. $100 used sure, but I wouldn't hand over more than that for a 144 on a bet. Why? It is just plastic, a rather uninteresting 14k nib and a regular old cheap converter fountain pen. You are entirely paying for the name. A 146 is a different story, but frankly I still wouldn't pay the new prices they command.

gwgtaylor
July 27th, 2014, 08:44 PM
tandaina, of course piston converters are piston pens and I guess I should have been more clear: integrated piston fillers are harder to clean than cartridge converters. The fact that you can remove the filling system and attach a bulb syringe for flushing helps but also the fact that a converter has a smaller piston that requires less torque to operate combined with the fact that most of them can be disassembled easily and, if need be, replaced for under $10. A 146 however gets stiff easily and paying ~$80 to have montblanc lube the piston is ludicrous. I paid $80 for a custom piston removal tool but it's all just silly. Get a 145 or 144 for less headaches and isn't getting to change inks easily and more often a plus? All those pretty inks out there.

tandaina
July 27th, 2014, 09:01 PM
I guess I've never used a bulb to clean any pen. Just keep filling and flushing until clear. So my converters and piston fillers are pretty much equal on ease of use.

Chrissy
August 1st, 2014, 09:37 AM
I have the new Meisterstuck 90th Anniversary LeGrand Red Gold broad nib pen and this 146 is a deight to write with.

The ink resevoir is ample but I have been informed that if you keep a particular colour in
the pen for too long on the long term the resevoir window will change from clear to
that colour.

It's possible, but it depends on the ink and how staining it is. Highly saturated inks will obviously stain more and quicker. An expert from Montblanc once advised me that red inks tend to stain more than any other colour.

However, Montblanc inks are not highly saturated, they are ph balanced and organically based, so they are less likely to stain an ink window than any other brand inks.

There are many ink brands that I use in C/C pens. However, in my Mb piston fillers with ink windows, I prefer to select from my Mb inks just to be on the safe side