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View Full Version : New lot! 9 x N.O.S old German fountain pens ca. 1935. Flex 'Edel' steel nib.



Lexaf
June 17th, 2014, 11:10 AM
A new lot of my restored N.O.S. old German pens.

Slightly different from the pens I offered in my earlier ad.
I call this variety Model #1A.
It is an almost identical design, the two differences are: a different model clip. The piston driver rod is not metal but plastic.


Specs:
Made in Germany
Manufactured around 1935.
No name or brand on the pens. Nibs branded 'Edel'

Material:
Barrel & Cap: Black chased Thermoplastic.
Top and blind end cap: Bakelite.
Section and feeder: Ebonite
Piston mechanism parts: Black plastic and cork seal.
Clip: gold color plated brass. (Plating material unknown, but probably not gold).
Filling system: piston (refurbished original corks). The pen has a blind cap to cover the filling knob.
Nib: Steel; remarkably flexible. The nib is stamped: 'Edel - Chromstahl - 1 Qual'
Flex runs from F to BBB (Differs a bit for each pen, all nibs have a slightly different character).
All pens come with an individual test writing sample.
Manufactured supposedly around 1935, never used (New old stock) and completely restored and rebuilt by me.

Dimensions: (small differences can occur as the pens were practically made by hand):
Closed: 134 mm
Without cap: 124 mm
Posted: 170 mm
Diam. over barrel: 11.85 mm
Diam over the cap: 13.36 mm

Please look at the pictures below.




Available:
all sold
there will be more in near future!

Asking us $ 20,-- each.
Shipping us$ 5,-- for 1 or 2 pens
Shipped World wide from The Netherlands
(standard priority letter mail, no insurance, no registry, no T&T).

When interested, please mail
HERE (lexvangalen@gmail.com)

Paypal only.



http://i1265.photobucket.com/albums/jj504/Lex_van_Galen/PP_Acceptance_Marks_for_LogoCenter_76x48_zpsd58824 30.png (http://s1265.photobucket.com/user/Lex_van_Galen/media/PP_Acceptance_Marks_for_LogoCenter_76x48_zpsd58824 30.png.html)

http://i1265.photobucket.com/albums/jj504/Lex_van_Galen/DSCF2265_zps03d06ca6.jpg (http://s1265.photobucket.com/user/Lex_van_Galen/media/DSCF2265_zps03d06ca6.jpg.html)

http://i1265.photobucket.com/albums/jj504/Lex_van_Galen/DSCF2267_zpsbf7b585c.jpg (http://s1265.photobucket.com/user/Lex_van_Galen/media/DSCF2267_zpsbf7b585c.jpg.html)

http://i1265.photobucket.com/albums/jj504/Lex_van_Galen/DSCF2273_zps3f92512a.jpg (http://s1265.photobucket.com/user/Lex_van_Galen/media/DSCF2273_zps3f92512a.jpg.html)

http://i1265.photobucket.com/albums/jj504/Lex_van_Galen/DSCF2274_zps472e95c2.jpg (http://s1265.photobucket.com/user/Lex_van_Galen/media/DSCF2274_zps472e95c2.jpg.html)

http://i1265.photobucket.com/albums/jj504/Lex_van_Galen/DSCF2276_zps6125e83d.jpg (http://s1265.photobucket.com/user/Lex_van_Galen/media/DSCF2276_zps6125e83d.jpg.html)

http://i1265.photobucket.com/albums/jj504/Lex_van_Galen/DSCF2279_zpsdf9bb5bd.jpg (http://s1265.photobucket.com/user/Lex_van_Galen/media/DSCF2279_zpsdf9bb5bd.jpg.html)


Thank you for looking!

luminesce
June 19th, 2014, 01:02 AM
Just to say my pen from the first batch arrived safe and sound in NZ, and is a sweet little writer - thank you! :)

Elizabeth

Lexaf
June 23rd, 2014, 09:28 AM
8 pieces sold, 1 that was on hold is canceled,
so still 1 pen of this lot available.

Lexaf
June 23rd, 2014, 09:30 AM
Just to say my pen from the first batch arrived safe and sound in NZ, and is a sweet little writer - thank you! :)

Elizabeth

Thank you so much Elizabeth! Enjoy!

stevekolt
June 23rd, 2014, 11:41 PM
I will take the last one if still available.

Lexaf
June 24th, 2014, 05:10 AM
I will take the last one if still available.

Mail sent for reply.

discopig
June 24th, 2014, 05:12 AM
Just a random question: Do you know if the nibs on these pens are tipped? They appear to be untipped steel to me but it's really hard to tell.

Lexaf
June 24th, 2014, 05:20 AM
Last one sold! :crazy_pilot:

Thank you Natasha! :thumb:

There will be more in a coming ad!:angel:

john
June 24th, 2014, 08:04 AM
Very impressive with the line variation.

Jon Szanto
June 24th, 2014, 11:19 AM
To anyone reading the thread:

- These pens are both unique and amazing
- Bang-for-buck coupled with a bit of history is off the charts
- Lex is simply one of the best people to deal with!

I wanted to shout this out in public, though Lex, I've got a personal note to you coming. I received one the other day (unfortunately just as some 'stuff' came down out in Real Life) and it is all that I wanted. Anyone who gets one of these has just made a very fun, fine purchase.

Go for the next batch!!!

AZBennett
June 24th, 2014, 11:26 AM
Now I am kicking myself for not grabbing one!!! Time to exercise some patience until the next lot come through.

Lexaf
June 25th, 2014, 05:46 AM
Thank you all, people, for all the warm reactions! :hug: It's such a good feeling to have fans! :fans:

Working hard to get a next batch ready before holiday obligations are going to steal all my time.
So please be patient, the coming weeks can be a bit slower in communication and handling, but...
There is still stock and I will do my best to get these beauties to you... :crazy_pilot:

Until the inevitable moment they will be sold out. For ever.... :cry:

Lexaf
June 25th, 2014, 05:57 AM
Just a random question: Do you know if the nibs on these pens are tipped? They appear to be untipped steel to me but it's really hard to tell.

Short answer: yes!

Long answer:
The nibs on the pens are tipped indeed, but only very lightly, which was quite usual for nibs made in the 30's. Also bear in mind that these pens and nibs were meant as low budget school pens and the nibs were actually a sort of 'war time' nibs as already halfway the 1930's the German authorities had restrictions on the use of gold for purposes like fountain pen nibs. So new steel alloy's were developed to meet the needs of flexible steel. Flex nibs were normal these days, as the standard German style of writing was cursive. The industry managed to produce cheap steel nibs, but Iridium (a metal of the Platinum family) was very expensive, especially the just recently in that era invented artificially refined Iridium. So just the minimum amount of Iridium that was needed to enforce the tips of the nib was applied.

Lex

RuiFromUK
June 25th, 2014, 06:12 AM
Brilliant explanation thank you very much.

Looking forward to see the next lot of pens since I missed the previous lots.

tandaina
June 25th, 2014, 12:13 PM
Mine arrived and is indeed in lovely condition and flexes beautifully. :) Fun pen!

bc.hiker
June 26th, 2014, 10:12 AM
Have to add to the conversation here!! I bought two of these WONDERFUL pens from Lex and they're among my very favorite pens. I'm really new at fountain pens and Lex gave me lots of tips and pointers to get me going with these piston fillers. They were my first flex nib pens and now it's gotten to the point where I'm not much of a fan of rigid nibs anymore. Lex is great to do business with too. So this is way more than a fair deal for a great pen, you'll make a friend besides. These pens are the real deal and the history behind them is just a bonus. A straight 5 stars for these pens & Lex!! :fans:

Lexaf
June 26th, 2014, 10:55 AM
@ bc.hiker:

:redface: :redface:

Thank You!!

discopig
June 26th, 2014, 02:12 PM
Just a random question: Do you know if the nibs on these pens are tipped? They appear to be untipped steel to me but it's really hard to tell.

Short answer: yes!

Long answer:
The nibs on the pens are tipped indeed, but only very lightly, which was quite usual for nibs made in the 30's. Also bear in mind that these pens and nibs were meant as low budget school pens and the nibs were actually a sort of 'war time' nibs as already halfway the 1930's the German authorities had restrictions on the use of gold for purposes like fountain pen nibs. So new steel alloy's were developed to meet the needs of flexible steel. Flex nibs were normal these days, as the standard German style of writing was cursive. The industry managed to produce cheap steel nibs, but Iridium (a metal of the Platinum family) was very expensive, especially the just recently in that era invented artificially refined Iridium. So just the minimum amount of Iridium that was needed to enforce the tips of the nib was applied.

Lex

Thanks for the answer! I guess even light tipping will survive much longer than bare steel.