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View Full Version : My first Pelikan, M250 w/ 14K Medium



KBeezie
August 29th, 2014, 10:29 PM
Just got this Pelikan M250 (Pre-89 I'm guessing due to logo and because it's Pelikan AG W.-Germany) with a 14K Medium nib (which I'm told was cleaned/polished by Richard Binder to get rid of the Patina). Got it in trade for my Platinum Century 3776 w/ 14K Soft Fine.

I was told it'd be small, but I actually find it kind of comfortable, reminds me somewhat of a 80s German Ero piston filling pen I had, just better made.

The nib is ever so smooth, seems like everytime I get one that I think is smooth, I end up with one that's even smoother than that.

My only issue is that it seems like a hard-starter even though I cleaned it out good even did a diluted ammonia flush. Since I could go several lines and have no flow after just 10 minutes.

Course I don't think it's a hard-starting issue but maybe a nib/feed connection issue because I noticed that if I try to write and it doesn't flow at all and if I keep going it still won't flow. But if I simply flip the pen over and just touch lightly the back of the nib to the paper (ie: as if you were going to try writing upside down), and then flip it back over. Instant flow. This tells me that the nib may not be seated in such a way to promote the flow of ink down to the tipping without a little help (ie: the opposite pressing towards the feed). My only issue is, I'm not sure how to correct that in a Pelikan since I'm not sure how the nib is seated in the silver collar in the combined unit, and I don't want to try to press the tip towards the feed without being sure it'd help.

Otherwise it seems like a lovely pen with a decent balance to it and posts very nicely.

Originally had Akkerman #6 (Binnenhof Blues) in it, but switched to Pelikan Edelstein Aventurine when I thought the ink was causing hard-starting, and now I just think it's a nib seating issue, because touching the back of the tipping and then flipping back over starts it up right away.

(Edit, I do think I have corrected the problem though, will know for sure later on as I let the pen sit upright for a while).

Some pretty pictures and a write sample:

http://static.karlblessing.com/pens/M250/uncapped.jpg

http://static.karlblessing.com/pens/M250/nib.jpg

http://static.karlblessing.com/pens/M250/cap.jpg

http://static.karlblessing.com/pens/M250/adventurine.jpg

After adjusting the nib (so that it writes right away even after sitting upright for 45 minutes to an hour, which was previously impossible without first pressing the back of the nib).
*
http://static.karlblessing.com/pens/M250/adventurine_fix.jpg

Jeph
August 30th, 2014, 04:12 AM
What you describe sounds like an air issue and not an ink issue. But turning over the nib and getting flow every time does imply to me that at least it is probably not caused by a crack in the back of the barrel.

The collar is friction fit over the nib and feed. This is a tight friction fit. Getting it back on is often a challenge. But I would not take it apart unless there is cause. First check the collar for a crack. Then check to see if the nib wiggles within the collar. Either of these is a problem. Then check to see if the alignment of the nib to the feed is correct. The amount that the nib sticks out in the picture looks correct but it does not hurt to make sure.

If everything is still good, then simply heat set the nib to the feed (with everything assembled as a unit) even though you have a plastic feed. Pelikan does this at the factory for each and every nib.

I notice that you say that you think you have it figured out, so I would not do anything else until you determine that you still have a problem.

One last note: Please, oh PLEASE, when you remove the nib unit grasp it firmly with your fingers (I use my thumb on top of the nib and cradle the feed in the fold under the first knuckle of my index finger) and rotate the barrel instead of the nib. That causes less stress on the collar because doing it other way usually causes you to apply different amounts of force to the nib and the feed and that translates to additional stress on the collar.

KBeezie
August 30th, 2014, 05:39 AM
What you describe sounds like an air issue and not an ink issue. But turning over the nib and getting flow every time does imply to me that at least it is probably not caused by a crack in the back of the barrel.

The collar is friction fit over the nib and feed. This is a tight friction fit. Getting it back on is often a challenge. But I would not take it apart unless there is cause. First check the collar for a crack. Then check to see if the nib wiggles within the collar. Either of these is a problem. Then check to see if the alignment of the nib to the feed is correct. The amount that the nib sticks out in the picture looks correct but it does not hurt to make sure.

If everything is still good, then simply heat set the nib to the feed (with everything assembled as a unit) even though you have a plastic feed. Pelikan does this at the factory for each and every nib.

I notice that you say that you think you have it figured out, so I would not do anything else until you determine that you still have a problem.

One last note: Please, oh PLEASE, when you remove the nib unit grasp it firmly with your fingers (I use my thumb on top of the nib and cradle the feed in the fold under the first knuckle of my index finger) and rotate the barrel instead of the nib. That causes less stress on the collar because doing it other way usually causes you to apply different amounts of force to the nib and the feed and that translates to additional stress on the collar.
Yep I'm aware, just like with the esterbrook, Faber-Castell, ero, etc. I cup the nib to the inside of my finger, then with my thumb I press down on the feed then I turn them together so that I'm not nudging the sides of the nib.

When I was looking thru my 60x loupe I noticed the ink flowed back when trying to do normal writing pressure so I carefully applied pressure back towards the nib until the flow went towards the tipping with normal writing pressure (also in a way to make the flow normal and not so freaking wet).

So far it looks promising because I leave it up right then go to use it a couple hours later and writes right away.

I did notice though now that you mention it, when I had the nib unit out for cleaning I could nudge the nib and would move side to side but not by much and not with normal pressure, though I wasn't aware it had to be very firm. (as in no nudge at all).

KBeezie
August 30th, 2014, 09:27 PM
http://static.karlblessing.com/pens/M250/adventurine_fix2.jpg

Got it to the point where it will write away after being upright for a while, but will dry out for a moment, but doesn't take much for the rest of the ink to catch up and it just keeps flowing normally from that point until I put the pen away again.

Edit: gave it another soak (diluted ammonia in a sample vial for couple hours, rinse, soak in lighter ammonia solution for an hour, rinse, soak in diluted water (changing water twice), then rinsing out final time just to be sure).

Edit #2 (Sept 1st)

And SUCCESS :D

After consistent results following adjustments with the Laan Van Nieuw Oost-Indigo and without any signs of drying out or starting up problems, I switched over to Noodler's Blue Steel (one of my favorite blue inks, which tends to be a bit too wet for certain pens I'd like to use it in), and find it to be very pleasing now.

Nib is very smooth with just a touch of smooth graphite feel to it that just glides without being too slick. Leans a tad towards wet but not too wet and dries decently on something like Rhodia 80g. The overall balance and experience with the pen was much better once it stopped giving me the drying out issue or inconsistent flow.

This will most likely become my daily writer for the medium width (My Montblanc 225 is the main writer for something bout as small as a Platinum EF).

:P

http://static.karlblessing.com/pens/M250/bluesteel.jpg

kidde
September 6th, 2014, 11:49 PM
Glad you've sorted it out. I find an M200 to be about perfect in size and balance posted. To me it seems that prior to the 60's about 5" was normal pen size. Almost all of my favorite pens vary between 4.75-5.25" capped and up to ~ 5.5" posted. Those who find it too small seem to not post and prefer oversized pens in general.
BTW your photo skills seem to really make your pens shine. Keep it up, they look very nice to me.

Paul

writingrav
September 7th, 2014, 07:33 AM
I love my M250. And I bought in new pre-1989!

KBeezie
September 8th, 2014, 06:07 AM
Glad you've sorted it out. I find an M200 to be about perfect in size and balance posted. To me it seems that prior to the 60's about 5" was normal pen size. Almost all of my favorite pens vary between 4.75-5.25" capped and up to ~ 5.5" posted. Those who find it too small seem to not post and prefer oversized pens in general.


I wonder if in the past the general population was also shorter as well.



BTW your photo skills seem to really make your pens shine. Keep it up, they look very nice to me.

Paul

Thanks. Also hopefully years down the road they might serve as a photographic reference to some pens especially if some of the existing ones are too poor to make out certain details.