PDA

View Full Version : Just bought my first Pelikan Limited Edition



JustDaveyB
July 3rd, 2012, 07:10 AM
Won on eBay one of these

754

Pelican Wall Street Limited Edition (M800 sized)

Now to tell the wife...

writingrav
July 3rd, 2012, 07:36 AM
Congratulations!

Sent from my DROID RAZR using Tapatalk 2

KrazyIvan
July 3rd, 2012, 09:35 AM
Very nice. I like that marble bluish grey pattern.

Bogon07
July 4th, 2012, 06:50 AM
Pelican Wall Street Limited Edition very Gordon Gecko, did you get the trouser braces too ?

It is a lovely pen. Ditto what KrazyIvan said. The little "plaque" on the barrel is a real eye-catcher too.

I hope it writes as good as it looks.


I'm sure you wife will forgive you as soon as she sees how good it is.

JustDaveyB
July 4th, 2012, 08:07 AM
Pelican Wall Street Limited Edition very Gordon Gecko, did you get the trouser braces too ?

It is a lovely pen. Ditto what KrazyIvan said. The little "plaque" on the barrel is a real eye-catcher too.

I hope it writes as good as it looks.


I'm sure you wife will forgive you as soon as she sees how good it is.

Am not certain I like the plaque but the price was good, it is mint, never inked with nib size sticker - a medium. I have two other M800 nibs that will probably live in it more often than not - Factory 1.5mm italic (really a stub as the edges are so smooth) and a 0.7mm CI by Richard Binder - now that it is a nib with some tooth...

dannzeman
July 6th, 2012, 05:43 PM
Now to tell the wife...
Hope she takes it well...

JustDaveyB
July 7th, 2012, 09:33 AM
Hope she takes it well...

I told her during our 6th Wedding anniversary dinner, after cooking her favourite dish and plying her with 21 year old Cabernet Sauvignon . She didn't seem to care as I had just produced her favourite dessert and a bottle of botrytis semillon - it is all in the timing...

peterpen53
July 8th, 2012, 11:38 AM
I told her during our 6th Wedding anniversary dinner, after cooking her favourite dish and plying her with 21 year old Cabernet Sauvignon . She didn't seem to care as I had just produced her favourite dessert and a bottle of botrytis semillon - it is all in the timing...

And now for the real interesting question: WHICH Cabernet Sauvignon?

JustDaveyB
July 8th, 2012, 03:55 PM
And now for the real interesting question: WHICH Cabernet Sauvignon?

An Australian one - Penfolds Bin 707 Cabernet Sauvignon 1991 - very much 21 years young - I still have one left of that same vintage to keep for a few more years.

Bogon07
July 8th, 2012, 06:39 PM
"her favourite dessert" sounds interesting.

I think I need to work on timing my pen buying confessions. Straight after her hard day at the office rant is probably not the best moment.


Happy anniversary too. Mrs Bogon cooked a Kangaroo steak for our's last week.

JustDaveyB
July 8th, 2012, 07:08 PM
A citrus tart using limes and oranges grown in our backyard.

I have learnt to tell my wife before the parcel arrives but after I have bought it - normally I have 7-10 working days wait for her to settle down before the parcel arrives - In the past I have waited till I had the pen before telling her, an almost tragic incident with a Pelican M600 Green o'Green taught me not tell her prices paid when she has the said pen in her hand...

peterpen53
July 9th, 2012, 03:47 AM
An Australian one - Penfolds Bin 707 Cabernet Sauvignon 1991 - very much 21 years young - I still have one left of that same vintage to keep for a few more years.

Sounds very good, that should have helped with your timing. Penfolds is one of my favorite wine growers. Thankfully one of the local liquor and wine store chains carries quite a few Australian brands. Some years ago I asked about a Penfolds Grange and I could have had it special ordered. Would probably have had to give up a Writers' Edition for a case. :)
I think I settled for a Bin 128 Shiraz.

Cheers,
Peter

JustDaveyB
July 9th, 2012, 03:53 AM
Sounds very good, that should have helped with your timing. Penfolds is one of my favorite wine growers. Thankfully one of the local liquor and wine store chains carries quite a few Australian brands. Some years ago I asked about a Penfolds Grange and I could have had it special ordered. Would probably have had to give up a Writers' Edition for a case. :)
I think I settled for a Bin 128 Shiraz.

Cheers,
Peter

I have only had one Grange, the 1986, I drank it when I turned 40 and it turned 21. An amazing wine. My local wine merchant still has a couple of bottles of it, only $1000 for 750ml bottle. I bought mine way back in 1991 for $87 - a lot of money in those days.

The money I used to spend on wine now is directed towards fountain pens.

peterpen53
July 9th, 2012, 04:05 AM
I have only had one Grange, the 1986, I drank it when I turned 40 and it turned 21. An amazing wine. My local wine merchant still has a couple of bottles of it, only $1000 for 750ml bottle. I bought mine way back in 1991 for $87 - a lot of money in those days.

The money I used to spend on wine now is directed towards fountain pens.

That is just what I thought. I had seen it in an upscale magazine, maybe on a plane, and I was curious because the bottle looked very special for a Penfolds.
Let's just hope it does not go the same way as the Chateau Pétrus...

JustDaveyB
July 9th, 2012, 06:00 AM
That is just what I thought. I had seen it in an upscale magazine, maybe on a plane, and I was curious because the bottle looked very special for a Penfolds.
Let's just hope it does not go the same way as the Chateau Pétrus...

They are special but probably not value for money. If I had a $1000 to spend on wine these days I would probably buy Sparkling (French or Australian) and Pinot Noirs (Australian or Kiwi), not made to age for decades Cabernet Sauvignon - I suppose it is easy for me to say as "I have been there drunk that" as it were.

peterpen53
July 10th, 2012, 01:54 AM
They are special but probably not value for money. If I had a $1000 to spend on wine these days I would probably buy Sparkling (French or Australian) and Pinot Noirs (Australian or Kiwi), not made to age for decades Cabernet Sauvignon - I suppose it is easy for me to say as "I have been there drunk that" as it were.

Well, my guiding principle is always that I buy wine to enjoy, not to have it stored for ages. :)
I've never seen a Kiwi Pinot Noir by the way. Most of the NZ wine that's available over here is white and really quite good, especially Sauvignon Blanc.

JustDaveyB
July 10th, 2012, 03:12 AM
Well, my guiding principle is always that I buy wine to enjoy, not to have it stored for ages. :)
I've never seen a Kiwi Pinot Noir by the way. Most of the NZ wine that's available over here is white and really quite good, especially Sauvignon Blanc.

There some really good kiwi pinots but not from any of the bigger wineries so they probably never get exported outside NZ much less around the world, of the Australian pinots I am a fan of the ones made in Tasmania. I don't mind NZ Sauvignon Blanc but they are really a wine to have with food, I enjoy a good well-made riesling more.

peterpen53
July 11th, 2012, 04:51 AM
There some really good kiwi pinots but not from any of the bigger wineries so they probably never get exported outside NZ much less around the world, of the Australian pinots I am a fan of the ones made in Tasmania. I don't mind NZ Sauvignon Blanc but they are really a wine to have with food, I enjoy a good well-made riesling more.

Keeping the good ones to themselves, hey? And right they are. And pinots are very particular about the climate they're grown in, I hear.
Well, most of the wine I drink I have with my dinner, and on top of that I really like wines with their own explicit flavour, so there's were the Sauvignon Blanc comes in. Most of the Rieslings I know are fairly mild-flavoured. Except for some really good french ones, to go with the choucroute. :)

(We really should not be discussing this in the Pelikan forum, should we? But it's great fun.)

JustDaveyB
July 11th, 2012, 06:09 AM
Keeping the good ones to themselves, hey? And right they are. And pinots are very particular about the climate they're grown in, I hear.
Well, most of the wine I drink I have with my dinner, and on top of that I really like wines with their own explicit flavour, so there's were the Sauvignon Blanc comes in. Most of the Rieslings I know are fairly mild-flavoured. Except for some really good french ones, to go with the choucroute. :)

(We really should not be discussing this in the Pelikan forum, should we? But it's great fun.)

I started the topic so anything goes, but back to the subject at hand. The pen arrived today. Some images of it and my other M800, the Blue o' Blue

802
808
803
804
805
806
807

peterpen53
July 11th, 2012, 09:41 AM
Looks great, they make a nice pair. Is it just perspective or is the Wall Street slightly longer?

By the way, the factory italic nib you mentioned in post #5, do you have that on a pen or as a separate nib unit? I've been looking for one, because I'd love to put one on one of my 800's, but I have not found a source yet.

Cheers,
Peter

JustDaveyB
July 11th, 2012, 12:50 PM
Just the perspective

I bought it with the Blue o' Blue from www.nibs.com but I use my 0.7mm CI custom grind more. The IB nib is not that great a nib IMHO

Bogon07
July 11th, 2012, 07:01 PM
Gee Peterpen53, I had to wiki choucroute:
Choucroute garnie (French (http://fpgeeks.com/wiki/French_language) for dressed sauerkraut; choucroute is a phonologically francophonic form of Alsacian (http://fpgeeks.com/wiki/Alsatian_language) Sürkrüt, c.f. German (http://fpgeeks.com/wiki/German_language) Sauerkraut) is a famous Alsacian (http://fpgeeks.com/wiki/Alsace) recipe for preparing sauerkraut (http://fpgeeks.com/wiki/Sauerkraut) with sausages (http://fpgeeks.com/wiki/Sausage) and other salted (http://fpgeeks.com/wiki/Salting_(food)) meats (http://fpgeeks.com/wiki/Meat) and charcuterie (http://fpgeeks.com/wiki/Charcuterie), and often potatoes (http://fpgeeks.com/wiki/Potato).
Although sauerkraut is a traditionally German (http://fpgeeks.com/wiki/Germany) and Eastern European (http://fpgeeks.com/wiki/Eastern_Europe) dish, the French annexation of Alsace (http://fpgeeks.com/wiki/Alsace) and Lorraine (http://fpgeeks.com/wiki/Lorraine_(province)) following the Peace of Westphalia (http://fpgeeks.com/wiki/Peace_of_Westphalia) in 1648 brought this dish to the attention of French chefs (http://fpgeeks.com/wiki/French_cuisine) and it has since been widely adopted in France (http://fpgeeks.com/wiki/France).

JustDaveyB, thanks for the extra Wallstreet pictures. I wished I was an investment banker so I could use and afford the pen. The Blue o Blue is nice too.


Maybe you guys could start a full blown wine thread in the Lounge or the Ink section. There is not that much difference between wine and inks anyway.

peterpen53
July 12th, 2012, 01:24 AM
Gee Peterpen53, I had to wiki choucroute:
Choucroute garnie (French (http://fpgeeks.com/wiki/French_language) for dressed sauerkraut; choucroute is a phonologically francophonic form of Alsacian (http://fpgeeks.com/wiki/Alsatian_language) Sürkrüt, c.f. German (http://fpgeeks.com/wiki/German_language) Sauerkraut) is a famous Alsacian (http://fpgeeks.com/wiki/Alsace) recipe for preparing sauerkraut (http://fpgeeks.com/wiki/Sauerkraut) with sausages (http://fpgeeks.com/wiki/Sausage) and other salted (http://fpgeeks.com/wiki/Salting_(food)) meats (http://fpgeeks.com/wiki/Meat) and charcuterie (http://fpgeeks.com/wiki/Charcuterie), and often potatoes (http://fpgeeks.com/wiki/Potato).
Although sauerkraut is a traditionally German (http://fpgeeks.com/wiki/Germany) and Eastern European (http://fpgeeks.com/wiki/Eastern_Europe) dish, the French annexation of Alsace (http://fpgeeks.com/wiki/Alsace) and Lorraine (http://fpgeeks.com/wiki/Lorraine_(province)) following the Peace of Westphalia (http://fpgeeks.com/wiki/Peace_of_Westphalia) in 1648 brought this dish to the attention of French chefs (http://fpgeeks.com/wiki/French_cuisine) and it has since been widely adopted in France (http://fpgeeks.com/wiki/France).

Well, you can't say you didn't learn something today. :) By the way, your quote shows you have to be careful with Wikipedia. To say that it's widely adopted in France is stretching it. It is very well adopted in the Alsace-Lorraine region, but that is only the northeastern corner of France.


JustDaveyB, thanks for the extra Wallstreet pictures. I wished I was an investment banker so I could use and afford the pen. The Blue o Blue is nice too.


Maybe you guys could start a full blown wine thread in the Lounge or the Ink section. There is not that much difference between wine and inks anyway.

I refuse to drink ink. We could talk about writing with wine (only the cheap one, that is).

peterpen53
July 12th, 2012, 01:27 AM
Just the perspective

I bought it with the Blue o' Blue from www.nibs.com but I use my 0.7mm CI custom grind more. The IB nib is not that great a nib IMHO

Thanks, but that is not a good source for me anyway. Wrong side of the pond (shipping, duties, VAT!!). I would prefer to source it inside the EU. I've been looking at Richard Binder's grinds too, but that's the same problem.

Bogon07
July 13th, 2012, 12:57 AM
Well, you can't say you didn't learn something today. :) By the way, your quote shows you have to be careful with Wikipedia. To say that it's widely adopted in France is stretching it. It is very well adopted in the Alsace-Lorraine region, but that is only the northeastern corner of France.
I'm always learning something new here on the FPG forum although it usually involves spending money immediately afterward

Thanks for the extra info too.

I was also drawn to the phrase "phonologically francophonic form".

ianmedium
July 13th, 2012, 09:54 AM
I think that along with the brown and green tortoiseshell they came out with not long ago have become my favourite Pelikans! A beautiful pen!

peterpen53
July 13th, 2012, 03:47 PM
I was also drawn to the phrase "phonologically francophonic form".

From the context I get what it means, but it would merit a Wikipedia search on its own. :)

JustDaveyB
July 13th, 2012, 04:40 PM
I'm always learning something new here on the FPG forum although it usually involves spending money immediately afterward

Thanks for the extra info too.

I was also drawn to the phrase "phonologically francophonic form".

Say that three times quickly...
phonologically francophonic form, phonologically francophonic form, phonologically francophonic form

A nice phrase to practise my cursive with.

Cyril
October 11th, 2017, 04:15 PM
Nice looking Pen. Few days ago I bought my first Pelikan. I am a bit disappointed I bought it. It was a M200 and what surprised me was the weight and the Pelikan nibs. I bought the pen initially with a Fine Nib. and as I had heard about the Pelikan nib variation to the other brands I bought an extra EF nib unite,be on the safe side that I have my prefered nib size.But surprisinly I had find bouth nibs have any difference.