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View Full Version : So the Esterbrook Brand being Revived?



KBeezie
November 7th, 2014, 10:31 PM
http://www.esterbrookpens.com/

No details, and just noticed it. I wonder if future nib units will be backwards compatible (as in the units screwing in).

http://i.imgur.com/j1eNs5R.jpg

Jon Szanto
November 7th, 2014, 10:56 PM
I saw that, too. They've had some very vague FB posts lately, couldn't even tell if they were personal or business in nature (impending news, etc). Certainly *hope* Renew Points would work, it would be a great thing. I'll be interested to see how this plays out...

KBeezie
November 7th, 2014, 11:10 PM
I saw that, too. They've had some very vague FB posts lately, couldn't even tell if they were personal or business in nature (impending news, etc). Certainly *hope* Renew Points would work, it would be a great thing. I'll be interested to see how this plays out...

Yea, should be interesting, as mentioned over on FPN there's a suspicion that it could be a knockoff.

Edit

Well not sure if this even means anything,

The website is created with Godaddy website generator. the Images are not hosted at that domain but at wsimg.com

and the domain is registered to :



Registrant Name: Robert Rosenberg
Registrant Organization: Harpen Brand Holdings,
Registrant Street: 87 Cooper Ave
Registrant City: West Long Branch
Registrant State/Province: New Jersey
Registrant Postal Code: 07764
Registrant Country: United States
Registrant Phone: +1.7326753448
Registrant Phone Ext:
Registrant Fax:
Registrant Fax Ext:
Registrant Email: harpenbrands@aol.com


Robert Rosenberg has posted in Pentrace in the past according to a friend of mine.

gbryal
November 10th, 2014, 05:19 AM
He used to own Conklin Pens before they were acquired by Yafa and looks like in the past he acquired trademarks for Mabie-Todd, Chilton, and other brands. Based on Conklin's new pens I would guess any continuity with the original Esterbrooks would be rough approximations of the original designs, but those pictures don't remind me of any of the Esterbrooks I have seen.

KBeezie
November 11th, 2014, 07:08 PM
Well they got some preview pictures up on their facebook page... I'm not really impressed, and the nib engraving looks really lazy, it's like they super-imposed the logo a little.

Definitely not what I expected if the idea was to bring back the brand.

https://www.facebook.com/permalink.php?story_fbid=816407845098190&id=153384988067149

http://www.fountainpennetwork.com/forum/uploads/imgs/fpn_1415754370__estie1.jpg

http://www.fountainpennetwork.com/forum/uploads/imgs/fpn_1415754386__estie2.jpg

Looks like the Ranga Acrylic pen minus the center band, but also something sort of like Duke/Uranus makes. (they deleted the entire comment thread when someone mentioned that in reply to someone asking where they were made on the facebook link above).

Lady Onogaro
November 11th, 2014, 09:33 PM
This is weird. Look at this: http://www.richardspens.com/?info=nibnoise

mrcharlie
November 11th, 2014, 09:57 PM
This is weird. Look at this: http://www.richardspens.com/?info=nibnoise
I don't see anything related to Esterbrook, but it looks like the November email was posted today and maybe it was the October Nib Noise when you added the link? I didn't find anyway to see last month's Nib Noise.

Jon Szanto
November 11th, 2014, 10:34 PM
I note, both on the page posted as well as the email that I received previously, that their schedule and timing has been altered by a death in the family, and then travel to and participation in the Ohio Pen Show.. Yes, these aren't right on time, but also for a fairly clear reason.

I saw nothing there about Esterbrook, though, so why the mention?

Steph
November 11th, 2014, 11:05 PM
I'd say this effort is closer to the modern Mabie Todd than the Wahl-Eversharp. Not much continuity here.

Sailor Kenshin
November 12th, 2014, 06:17 AM
The metal section would rule it out for me.

Ernst Bitterman
November 12th, 2014, 10:56 AM
It does look rather like non-Crescent stuff from the early days of the Conklin revival. I think I'd have a more open mind if they weren't calling this model "J Series."

Lady Onogaro
November 12th, 2014, 11:22 AM
This is weird. Look at this: http://www.richardspens.com/?info=nibnoise
I don't see anything related to Esterbrook, but it looks like the November email was posted today and maybe it was the October Nib Noise when you added the link? I didn't find anyway to see last month's Nib Noise.

I was referring to the pictures of the pens. The new "Esterbrooks" look just like the pens on the Binder site's page. I should have sent this link: http://www.richardspens.com/. My bad. I don't know why it came up as the Nib Noise site.

I guess I expect an Esterbrook to look like one of the old ones, not like a Konrad Acrylic or a kit pen.

gbryal
November 12th, 2014, 12:00 PM
This is weird. Look at this: http://www.richardspens.com/?info=nibnoise
I don't see anything related to Esterbrook, but it looks like the November email was posted today and maybe it was the October Nib Noise when you added the link? I didn't find anyway to see last month's Nib Noise.

I was referring to the pictures of the pens. The new "Esterbrooks" look just like the pens on the Binder site's page. I should have sent this link: http://www.richardspens.com/. My bad. I don't know why it came up as the Nib Noise site.

I guess I expect an Esterbrook to look like one of the old ones, not like a Konrad Acrylic or a kit pen.

I might be ok with Bexleys with an Esterbrook name and price point!

KBeezie
November 12th, 2014, 07:37 PM
This is weird. Look at this: http://www.richardspens.com/?info=nibnoise
I don't see anything related to Esterbrook, but it looks like the November email was posted today and maybe it was the October Nib Noise when you added the link? I didn't find anyway to see last month's Nib Noise.

I was referring to the pictures of the pens. The new "Esterbrooks" look just like the pens on the Binder site's page. I should have sent this link: http://www.richardspens.com/. My bad. I don't know why it came up as the Nib Noise site.

I guess I expect an Esterbrook to look like one of the old ones, not like a Konrad Acrylic or a kit pen.

I might be ok with Bexleys with an Esterbrook name and price point!

I have my doubts that they would be belexy or at least in the same quality as them.

Based on the pics, skittish lack of replies, disappearing comments and responses (and request for legitimate questions to be removed from open facebook groups) I'm going to guess it's just going to be a rebranded low quality Chinese/Indian pen. Time will tell tough but they are not off to a good star as far as how they handle public relations.

gregamckinney
November 14th, 2014, 11:59 AM
I am sure I'm not the market they are looking toward, but these do not appeal to me at all.
I am also amused that I keep reading the last word in the title of this thread as reviled.

greg

Farmboy
November 14th, 2014, 02:26 PM
I am sure I'm not the market they are looking toward, but these do not appeal to me at all.
I am also amused that I keep reading the last word in the title of this thread as reviled.

greg
Greg,

It was determined on another board that the introduction of these pens would not mean the original (vintage) Esterbrooks would be removed from the market. I guess for now, you and I can continue to fill gaps in the hoard.

Todd

Jon Szanto
November 14th, 2014, 02:29 PM
Greg,

It was determined on another board that the introduction of these pens would not mean the original (vintage) Esterbrooks would be removed from the market. I guess for now, you and I can continue to fill gaps in the hoard.

Todd

Thank gods. I have a couple of those rare "Bell System Property" pens, and I didn't want the market to bottom out. Big-time money, here I come!!

Farmboy
November 14th, 2014, 06:05 PM
Greg,

It was determined on another board that the introduction of these pens would not mean the original (vintage) Esterbrooks would be removed from the market. I guess for now, you and I can continue to fill gaps in the hoard.

Todd

Thank gods. I have a couple of those rare "Bell System Property" pens, and I didn't want the market to bottom out. Big-time money, here I come!!
Jon,

Not bottom out, the fear was the old Esterbrooks were going to be pulled from the market by the manufacturer in favor of pushing sales to the new models.

My sources confirm that this will not happen. If you are worried, there is still adequate stocking levels at this major retailer (http://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_from=R40&_trksid=p2050601.m570.l1313.TR10.TRC1.A0.H0.XEster brook&_nkw=Esterbrook&_sacat=0).

Jon Szanto
November 14th, 2014, 11:18 PM
My sources confirm that this will not happen.

I am relieved and filled with gratitude. Not to mention being stuck with those #*^%$#%& "Bell" pens... http://i211.photobucket.com/albums/bb204/EnvoyC/emotes/rolleyes.gif

gregamckinney
November 15th, 2014, 02:30 AM
I am sure I'm not the market they are looking toward, but these do not appeal to me at all.
I am also amused that I keep reading the last word in the title of this thread as reviled.

greg
Greg,

It was determined on another board that the introduction of these pens would not mean the original (vintage) Esterbrooks would be removed from the market. I guess for now, you and I can continue to fill gaps in the hoard.

Todd

I am not generally on the supply side of the Esterbrook economy.
Yet still, having recently moved, I was reminded of the volume and mass of the pens in my life.
Even at a mere 0.03 picoTodds of Esterbrooks, maybe I could afford to let a few go.

greg

KBeezie
December 1st, 2014, 01:11 PM
So, it's December 1st, no updates on their website.

Only recent thing that happened is this post on facebook: https://www.facebook.com/153384988067149/photos/a.816203245118650.1073741826.153384988067149/827710213967953/?type=1

In their mobile uploads folder.

http://www.fountainpennetwork.com/forum/uploads/imgs/fpn_1417460886__esterbrook-dec1-post.jpg

And as usual I still can't like/comment/etc anything on their page.

gbryal
December 3rd, 2014, 07:02 PM
Apparently it's a luxury brand now: $400 for their LE Deluxe pen. The new "J" is $75, $65 for rollerball.

Scrawler
December 3rd, 2014, 08:05 PM
They will have a very hard job improving on the original. I wonder if they will even be doing the trademark replaceable nib assemblies.

KBeezie
December 3rd, 2014, 08:43 PM
Apparently it's a luxury brand now: $400 for their LE Deluxe pen. The new "J" is $75, $65 for rollerball.

Yea saw that, and the $75 one doesn't look much better than what you can get a Ranga Acrylic for.

pajaro
December 4th, 2014, 12:57 PM
Apparently it's a luxury brand now: $400 for their LE Deluxe pen. The new "J" is $75, $65 for rollerball.

Yea saw that, and the $75 one doesn't look much better than what you can get a Ranga Acrylic for.

It seems the Esterbrook brand os being brought back as another pretentious vendor of collectibles. As far as a relationship to the original Esterbrook product or the rest of this subforum is concerned, it seems to be a non sequitur. This new product being a John Doe product as if he changed his name to John Esterbrook to fool the unwary into thinking there was in fact a relationship to the original Esterbrook product.

Scrawler
December 4th, 2014, 03:29 PM
I will not buy it just because its name is Esterbrook. I would buy it if it is a good pen that met my expectations for the price.

tandaina
December 4th, 2014, 03:37 PM
The pictures you all have posted sure don't look like high end pens. Those looks barely above kit pens, ugly, unbalanced, and with nothing to recommend them over a hundred other cheap pens. :\

mrcharlie
December 4th, 2014, 09:46 PM
I kind of resent the marketing which implies, if not outright states that "Esterbrook" is the US' oldest pen company, as if it had been in continuous operation since the 19th century, or as if this current company was in any way a continuation of the original company. They either bought the trademarks or acquired them due to the previous owner not making use of them for the required maximum amount of time you can not use but still own them. There is no other connection; no continuous management chain, corporate/company history, or production facilities. I guess it is legal, but it prejudices me against them.

There are other active names brought back from the dead where they acknowledge they are bringing back a formerly glorious name and not the old company with a new product and marketing plan, from Kaweco (pens) to Shinola (shoe polish and watches and journals and bikes and stuff) to Triumph (motorcycles) and that doesn't bother me. So far, this one does. The registered trademark says right in it "established 1858" but the current company sure as h___ was not.

gbryal
December 4th, 2014, 10:21 PM
I share the sentiments of those who find the marketing aspect to be distasteful. On the other hand, I recently bought a new model Conklin Endura. Maybe I wouldn't have if I had an emotional investment in older Conklins, but unlike Esterbrooks, I heard of those later, and don't have several on hand.

I'd like to keep my mind open to the possibility that these first pens are driving funding to do real research and invest in production of pens worthy of the name. Part of me thinks we need anything that brings new customers to the hobby, even brand holding companies. On the other hand, we don't want to instantly lose the same customer because of a bad experience or color the reputation of vintage pens that have nothing to do with the new ones.

Still, like kbeezie said, you can get a good Ranga for the price. Or several Metropolitans. A passel of Jinhaos. Or a TWSBI Vac-700, which has roughly the same shape.

Until someone actually has one of these pens, we can only speculate as to the quality, though aesthetically, they wouldn't be my first choice. I am still guessing a rebranded chinese pen like the Nemosine, but I don't know that. That in itself doesn't mean it will be a bad pen, either. Still, $75 to find out.

On the positive side, vintage Esterbrook lovers can possibly reach a new audience with these new customers if they come and post in this Esterbrook forum about their new pens.

KBeezie
December 5th, 2014, 10:30 AM
I kind of resent the marketing which implies, if not outright states that "Esterbrook" is the US' oldest pen company, as if it had been in continuous operation since the 19th century, or as if this current company was in any way a continuation of the original company. They either bought the trademarks or acquired them due to the previous owner not making use of them for the required maximum amount of time you can not use but still own them. There is no other connection; no continuous management chain, corporate/company history, or production facilities. I guess it is legal, but it prejudices me against them.

There are other active names brought back from the dead where they acknowledge they are bringing back a formerly glorious name and not the old company with a new product and marketing plan, from Kaweco (pens) to Shinola (shoe polish and watches and journals and bikes and stuff) to Triumph (motorcycles) and that doesn't bother me. So far, this one does. The registered trademark says right in it "established 1858" but the current company sure as h___ was not.


I agree the Established 1858 bit is flat-out false advertising far as I'm concerned because it's clear that the new pens have nothing to do with the old ones. If they also acquired the original patents and developed some revivals using roughly the same design with some modern adjustments, then it may be more forgivable, since at least something of the original was carried over.


I share the sentiments of those who find the marketing aspect to be distasteful. On the other hand, I recently bought a new model Conklin Endura. Maybe I wouldn't have if I had an emotional investment in older Conklins, but unlike Esterbrooks, I heard of those later, and don't have several on hand.


Speaking of Conklin I actually got a modern day Glider in exchange for some of my pens. From the picture I was expecting it to be constructed about the same as my Taccia Momenta (which originally was about an $80 pen as well). But the only thing really "cheaper" about the glider was the nib and feed (the nib I was at least able to replace with a #6 Franklin-Christoph Masuyama Needlepoint grind, but I did have to replace the feed with a similar one from one of my other nib units just to make the nib fit better as conklin's seems a little thicker), everything else on the acrylic seemed nicer the metal support in both the barrel and section so that it's not acrylic screwing onto metal but metal-on-metal along with the inside of the section seeming to be reinforced by a metal collar. So at least minor little things like that seems to improve the quality in general.

I've never used an original Conklin so I don't have much basis for comparison in terms of being true to their history, but just from pictures the modern glider is certainly not a vintage glider :D

I just have a feeling that the esterbrooks seemingly similar in the acrylic design are not going to have those little niceties that improve the overall quality of construction simply as another acrylic clone of sort.

Jon Szanto
December 5th, 2014, 10:58 AM
It is looking, and it has since the beginning, like just another rip-off of a name and lesser quality pens trying to ride those coat tails. The photos don't look good, certainly from an aesthetics point, though it is impossible to tell the quality. The modern Conklin's are a similar story: with the exception of their more expensive models, none of them seem to hold a candle to the original Conklin pens, and even the upper-tier pens (Mark Twain Crescent-filler, etc) have had q/c issues. Engraving is cheap laser engraving on ugly, oversize clips, etc. A real blight on the name of a fine company.

gbryal
December 5th, 2014, 11:18 AM
I've never used an original Conklin so I don't have much basis for comparison in terms of being true to their history, but just from pictures the modern glider is certainly not a vintage glider :D


I like my Endura except for one thing; when the cap is screwed on I can move it side to side slightly, and eventually it comes loose. I contacted YAFA and they never wrote back. I don't know if the Endura was from the Esterbrook guy's tenure or YAFAs, but either way, that bums me out.

manoeuver
December 5th, 2014, 11:20 AM
At least Conklin brought back the Crescent Filler. Other quibbles aside, if one wishes to, they can view the new Conklins as an homage to the old- the new boss was savvy enough to make that possible.

I've not seen that kind of effort from the new boss at Esterbrook- yet. I've got no expectations for the new folks (good or bad) but it's be a stretch to call what they've done so far promising.

Here's a fun question that Nobody's asked: If you were in charge of resurrecting a revered-but-defunct pen brand, what would you do to gain good press, good vibes and get the pen community behind you?

david i
December 5th, 2014, 11:36 AM
At least Conklin brought back the Crescent Filler. Other quibbles aside, if one wishes to, they can view the new Conklins as an homage to the old- the new boss was savvy enough to make that possible.

I've not seen that kind of effort from the new boss at Esterbrook- yet. I've got no expectations for the new folks (good or bad) but it's be a stretch to call what they've done so far promising.

Here's a fun question that Nobody's asked: If you were in charge of resurrecting a revered-but-defunct pen brand, what would you do to gain good press, good vibes and get the pen community behind you?

Caveat to answer, because apparently the Wahl-Eversharp name has had continuous active ownership if not active product for many years, but you can see the phoenixing of a seemingly long-gone pen brand done rather well by looking at what Syd has done.

regards

d-

Jon Szanto
December 5th, 2014, 11:39 AM
Here's a fun question that Nobody's asked: If you were in charge of resurrecting a revered-but-defunct pen brand, what would you do to gain good press, good vibes and get the pen community behind you?

I'd pretty much do everything that Syd Saperstein has done with the Wahl-Eversharp brand. Take the best of the past, marry it with contemporary methods and materials, promote it through the fountain pen community, have a presence within said community, and have a deep knowledge of the brand and the history of pens in general. Class act.

KBeezie
December 5th, 2014, 11:52 AM
Here's a fun question that Nobody's asked: If you were in charge of resurrecting a revered-but-defunct pen brand, what would you do to gain good press, good vibes and get the pen community behind you?

I'd pretty much do everything that Syd Saperstein has done with the Wahl-Eversharp brand. Take the best of the past, marry it with contemporary methods and materials, promote it through the fountain pen community, have a presence within said community, and have a deep knowledge of the brand and the history of pens in general. Class act.

As opposed to (New) Esterbrook, you ask a question, one of three things happens:

1) You get question removed and banned from being able to comment on any future postings
2) You just never get an answer
3) Or you get told to email them for an answer, and don't hear back.

manoeuver
December 5th, 2014, 02:43 PM
At least Conklin brought back the Crescent Filler. Other quibbles aside, if one wishes to, they can view the new Conklins as an homage to the old- the new boss was savvy enough to make that possible.

I've not seen that kind of effort from the new boss at Esterbrook- yet. I've got no expectations for the new folks (good or bad) but it's be a stretch to call what they've done so far promising.

Here's a fun question that Nobody's asked: If you were in charge of resurrecting a revered-but-defunct pen brand, what would you do to gain good press, good vibes and get the pen community behind you?

Caveat to answer, because apparently the Wahl-Eversharp name has had continuous active ownership if not active product for many years, but you can see the phoenixing of a seemingly long-gone pen brand done rather well by looking at what Syd has done.

regards

d-
David, as I wrote that post I was thinking about what awesome work Syd has been doing, and I wondered how quickly someone would bring him up as a great example of how to bring a name brand back.

welch
December 5th, 2014, 04:02 PM
Looks like the reverse of what Syd "The Wahlnut" Saperstein did with the current Wahl/Eversharp Skyline. Painful to remember, but I hoped in 2009 that someone would

- take a government loan
- open a factory in Camden, NJ,
- begin making cartridge-converter pens that looked like the Esterbrook J-series, and with a nib that fit the Esterbrook Renew-point.

(I figured that real-estate in Camden must be cheap since the city has disintegrated over the last 45 years. New Estie? Ugh)

For me, the Levenger True-write is the closest we have to the glorious Esterbrook pens.

manoeuver
December 5th, 2014, 08:00 PM
Camden may be cheap, but new jersey is a terrible place to try to do business. I wonder if there's even infrastructure left in Camden to support manufacture of anything besides soup.

welch
December 5th, 2014, 10:19 PM
Camden may be cheap, but new jersey is a terrible place to try to do business. I wonder if there's even infrastructure left in Camden to support manufacture of anything besides soup.

Probably not...I say, having been there exactly once. Otherwise, NJ is pretty handy: I-95 runs right through, and there are still freight lines.

mrcharlie
December 5th, 2014, 11:04 PM
Caveat to answer, because apparently the Wahl-Eversharp name has had continuous active ownership if not active product for many years, but you can see the phoenixing of a seemingly long-gone pen brand done rather well by looking at what Syd has done.


Yes, Wahl-Eversharp is another one done well I could have had in my short list. They are respectful of the tradition of the name but not pretending to be the original company.

I don't know what Syd and compatriots had to do/pay to own the trademarks, but I can confirm the "Eversharp" part was being used for pen related products and they probably had to pay to get them, and Wahl is of course still going in non-writing instrument products. I purchased some "generic" ballpoint refills using the Eversharp name and logo in a drug store about 10 years ago. I think (but am not sure) they were the same refills as sold under the "Penatia" brand, and I believe under some private label store brands today. They did function well, fwiw.


If they also acquired the original patents and developed some revivals using roughly the same design with some modern adjustments, then it may be more forgivable, since at least something of the original was carried over.
They don't need to acquire patents; patents don't last that long. Depending on when filed and what type of patent, they are about 14-20 years from original filing in the US, and Esterbrook has been functionally dead for much longer than that.

KBeezie
December 6th, 2014, 12:54 AM
They don't need to acquire patents; patents don't last that long. Depending on when filed and what type of patent, they are about 14-20 years from original filing in the US, and Esterbrook has been functionally dead for much longer than that.

Well I should rephrase, if they acquired the original design specs if they desired to make a near clone to an original that would have been cool, but unlikely to happen... but cool. (course reverse engineering it now days would be pretty easy regardless if you have the resources and one in hand). Like... I don't know an original J design, but in a piston or c/c demonstrator format?

Farmboy
December 6th, 2014, 02:17 AM
Here's a fun question that Nobody's asked: If you were in charge of resurrecting a revered-but-defunct pen brand, what would you do to gain good press, good vibes and get the pen community behind you?

I'd pretty much do everything that Syd Saperstein has done with the Wahl-Eversharp brand. Take the best of the past, marry it with contemporary methods and materials, promote it through the fountain pen community, have a presence within said community, and have a deep knowledge of the brand and the history of pens in general. Class act.

As opposed to (New) Esterbrook, you ask a question, one of three things happens:

1) You get question removed and banned from being able to comment on any future postings
2) You just never get an answer
3) Or you get told to email them for an answer, and don't hear back.

So why all the interest?

manoeuver
December 6th, 2014, 06:53 AM
Camden may be cheap, but new jersey is a terrible place to try to do business. I wonder if there's even infrastructure left in Camden to support manufacture of anything besides soup.

Probably not...I say, having been there exactly once. Otherwise, NJ is pretty handy: I-95 runs right through, and there are still freight lines.
I'm talking about sky-high taxes and brutal bureaucratic obstacles.

gbryal
December 10th, 2014, 09:15 AM
The Deluxe is open for purchase, according to their FB page, though it looks like the only way to do so is to email them.

chad.trent
December 11th, 2014, 09:18 AM
I emailed them about it. Here's what I got back...




Our Esterbrook Products will be available for purchase at our online store on our website which will be live in two weeks.

They can also be purchased through select retail accounts nationwide. Our Limited Edition Deluxe Fountain Pen is now available and can be ordered directly. Attached is information forthe pen which will retail for $400.00
If you are interested , let us know and we will provide payment and shipping details.


They attached a Word file (Word? Really?) describing the pen. Here's what it says:




Esterbrook, America’s Original Pen Company returns with the release of the Esterbrook “Deluxe” Limited Edition Fountain Pen. This Iconic brand of fine writing instruments is proud to reintroduce their famous Esterbrook Deluxe model originally released in the 1950’s as a one of a kind limited edition.

Available in three stunning colors, Sapphire Blue, Emerald Green and Burgundy/Black Pearl. Each Fountain pen is hand made using a special acrylic sourced exclusively for Esterbrook. Each cap and grip section is made from Solid Sterling Silver which has been hand etched with a unique check pattern and hand polished. A sterling silver band and clip complete each pen. Available with a German Iridium silver plated nib in Medium Point and utilizes a convertor/Cartridge filing system. Each pen is numbered with only 150 pens available worldwide for each color.

The Esterbrook Deluxe is sure to be a collector’s item as the first release for the revival of this Iconic brand of fine writing Instruments.

Scrawler
December 11th, 2014, 09:58 AM
So this will be a revival of the name only, and not the core concept. The description is of a radical departure from the original concept. Still they may well be nice pens in their own right. I am wondering about that nib description. It says it is "silver plated". So not a rhodium plated steel or gold nib. How well would silver plate last in a nib? It would tarnish quickly. Are there any other silver plated nibs?

whych
December 11th, 2014, 04:58 PM
Are there any other silver plated nibs?
Sheaffer used to make Palladium Silver nibs.

david i
December 11th, 2014, 05:12 PM
Are there any other silver plated nibs?
Sheaffer used to make Palladium Silver nibs.

Alloy though.

-d

Frank
December 24th, 2014, 10:45 AM
So this will be a revival of the name only, and not the core concept. The description is of a radical departure from the original concept. Still they may well be nice pens in their own right. I am wondering about that nib description. It says it is "silver plated". So not a rhodium plated steel or gold nib. How well would silver plate last in a nib? It would tarnish quickly. Are there any other silver plated nibs?


Sad to say, but correct.....

Frank

pajaro
December 25th, 2014, 10:17 PM
I emailed them about it. Here's what I got back...



They attached a Word file (Word? Really?) describing the pen. Here's what it says:




Esterbrook, America’s Original Pen Company returns with the release of the Esterbrook “Deluxe” Limited Edition Fountain Pen. This Iconic brand of fine writing instruments is proud to reintroduce their famous Esterbrook Deluxe model originally released in the 1950’s as a one of a kind limited edition.

Available in three stunning colors, Sapphire Blue, Emerald Green and Burgundy/Black Pearl. Each Fountain pen is hand made using a special acrylic sourced exclusively for Esterbrook. Each cap and grip section is made from Solid Sterling Silver which has been hand etched with a unique check pattern and hand polished. A sterling silver band and clip complete each pen. Available with a German Iridium silver plated nib in Medium Point and utilizes a convertor/Cartridge filing system. Each pen is numbered with only 150 pens available worldwide for each color.

The Esterbrook Deluxe is sure to be a collector’s item as the first release for the revival of this Iconic brand of fine writing Instruments.

An expensive item of uncertain quality?

pajaro
December 25th, 2014, 10:21 PM
So this will be a revival of the name only, and not the core concept. The description is of a radical departure from the original concept. Still they may well be nice pens in their own right. I am wondering about that nib description. It says it is "silver plated". So not a rhodium plated steel or gold nib. How well would silver plate last in a nib? It would tarnish quickly. Are there any other silver plated nibs?

Sad to say, but correct.....

Frank

I think this was entirely predictable. Purchase the name that made quality budget pens and offer expensive stuff. It seems unsavory somehow.

Neo
December 25th, 2014, 10:35 PM
So this will be a revival of the name only, and not the core concept. The description is of a radical departure from the original concept. Still they may well be nice pens in their own right. I am wondering about that nib description. It says it is "silver plated". So not a rhodium plated steel or gold nib. How well would silver plate last in a nib? It would tarnish quickly. Are there any other silver plated nibs?

Sad to say, but correct.....

Frank

I think this was entirely predictable. Purchase the name that made quality budget pens and offer expensive stuff. It seems unsavory somehow.

The secrecy from this manufacturer certainly leads to that conclusion.....

Silverbreeze
December 26th, 2014, 07:09 AM
Me is sadface... Or for those unlucky enough to be working boxing day.. And therefore have had their morning coffee or tea. This makes me sad. They will polute a legacy for cheap profit again!!!!

pajaro
December 31st, 2014, 03:04 AM
Here's a fun question that Nobody's asked: If you were in charge of resurrecting a revered-but-defunct pen brand, what would you do to gain good press, good vibes and get the pen community behind you?

I'd pretty much do everything that Syd Saperstein has done with the Wahl-Eversharp brand. Take the best of the past, marry it with contemporary methods and materials, promote it through the fountain pen community, have a presence within said community, and have a deep knowledge of the brand and the history of pens in general. Class act.

As opposed to (New) Esterbrook, you ask a question, one of three things happens:

1) You get question removed and banned from being able to comment on any future postings
2) You just never get an answer
3) Or you get told to email them for an answer, and don't hear back.

So why all the interest?

Now that's a very good question.

I think we hear of the name being revived, but it doesn't mean bringing back something following from the older product. I think that something in the TWSBI price range would have generated more interest in purchasing. For that kind of money I would have expected something more in line with Pelikan or Montblanc.

Lady Onogaro
January 6th, 2015, 10:26 PM
Okay, folks. Here they are at Fahrney's:

http://www.fahrneyspens.com/Item--i-30672S

picautomaton
January 7th, 2015, 02:51 AM
Yikes! That crude looking step from section to barrel (could be jut the image)

Scrawler
January 7th, 2015, 07:32 AM
Okay, folks. Here they are at Fahrney's:

http://www.fahrneyspens.com/Item--i-30672S

The the general design and the acrylic make for a quite nice looking pen, and the price is not outrageous. I do wonder how I would get on with such a large step between the barrel an the section. These do bear closer looking at.

TerraNoir
January 10th, 2015, 09:02 AM
I have rather loved the vintage Esterbrook pens. Just reading over this thread, I will admit to be slightly on the fence about this particular relaunch of the brand. It looks nothing like a traditional J. I wish they had brought it back. The pen looks nice and I might get it one day...with a gift card...if I got everything else I wanted. Maybe. I will have to agree this is rather disappointing. I am quite sad face indeed.

Laura N
February 5th, 2015, 08:26 PM
So here are some links to further information on these pens.

First is a review done by the Andersons (http://blog.andersonpens.com/pen-review-new-esterbrook-j-series-pens/). I don't watch videos, so I'll have to wait for someone who did, but I found the written review extremely informative. There are excellent comparison photos, too.

Here's something from a branding perspective (http://www.leighreyes.com/?p=4862).

Finally here are some thoughts by a fountain pen blogger (http://fpquest.com/2015/02/04/brand-revival/).

I found these very thoughtful and informative. Apparently there's some controversy here, if you read between the lines, but I honestly know nothing about that. Maybe others do. A friend sent me these links, and I remembered this thread.

Jon Szanto
February 5th, 2015, 08:42 PM
Oh, girl, there is plenty of controversy to go around. As is often the case, it emanates from humans; in this case, the guy that's running the company.

Laura N
February 5th, 2015, 08:43 PM
^^ Anything to share?

I don't do Facebook unfortunately in this instance. :)

ETA: nothing actionable, however. :)

Jon Szanto
February 5th, 2015, 08:54 PM
Hmmm. Well, I'm ready to go out the door to some theatre, but I'll see what I can bring up when I get back. The phrase "piece of work" describes a lot of this. Just ask Lisa Anderson.

Laura N
February 5th, 2015, 09:10 PM
Got it.

Well, not knowing the people involved, I guess the main thing for potential purchasers would be, what are the pens like? I thought the Andersons' review gives balanced insight into the pens they tried. And I thought the other links contained some thoughtful opinions as well.

dgator
February 5th, 2015, 10:38 PM
An article about reviving the Esterbrook brand:
http://www.usatoday.com/story/money/business/2015/02/05/reviving-the-pen-that-wrote-american-history/22941265/

Scrawler
February 5th, 2015, 11:35 PM
Learning that the threads are on the section has put me off a bit. They appear to be up against the step. I have used a vintage pen with threads on the section, but they were on the front end, with a section to grip behind. I do like the appearance of the nib. That starburst invokes the 1930s. Shame they did not go for a screw in nib. If I owned that marque, and I was reviving the brand, I would make sure that existing nibs could be screwed in.

Jon Szanto
February 6th, 2015, 11:53 AM
Well, not knowing the people involved, I guess the main thing for potential purchasers would be, what are the pens like? I thought the Andersons' review gives balanced insight into the pens they tried. And I thought the other links contained some thoughtful opinions as well.

I think there are two issues at play in this general subject, with regard to the postings in various pen fora: how good are the pens actually, as writing instruments, and how well has the company producing all of this reflected on the original brand.

Well, you can see many people's subjective opinions on just looking at the designs and features of the pens in many of these threads, but it is just very recently do we have hands-on reviews, like the Anderson's, of them. So we are now starting to get the functional aspects, and this will gradually spread out and give some kind of idea-before-buying.

To be honest, most of the writings - and gnashing of teeth - ends up in two ways: "they sure as hell didn't do justice to the Esterbrook name, they don't look like Esties, they're cheap Chinese-type pens with a name etched on..." and etc. That, again, is subjective but understandable, being that Esties are so revered for both people who used them long ago, and certainly as valued 'starter' vintage pens, and easily serviced and collectible pens. Many feel that there is virtually *no* connection to the name, save for the crass angle of just using the name as a marketing ploy.

Which leads to the last element, the owner of the company and main antagonist in our story, Mr. Rosenberg. If you like, follow the link below (a thread on FPN). There has been a lot of interaction between he and potential users, and this was initiated by their posting on Facebook, a very public forum. They invited comments, but then they did a horrendous job of dealing with that. Way too much for me to catalog here, but ample examples of a person who is ill-equipped to deal with the public, and - as Leigh Reyes pointed out - a stunning example of how NOT to launch a company in this era, and a textbook case in mishandling marketing and social media. There are anecdotal stories in the FPN thread documenting this man's mishandling of earlier "revivals" (the Esties aren't the first!), and my bottom line is that if this guy has launched unhinged attacks on the phone against someone like Lisa Anderson, not once but twice, he really isn't playing with a full deck.

There. That was a lot of typing. ;)

You can check out the FPN thread here (http://www.fountainpennetwork.com/forum/index.php/topic/277581-esterbrook-brand-being-revived-this-december/), but the last couple pages would highlight the recent events well enough. Off to the gym...

whych
February 6th, 2015, 05:24 PM
Like all you guys say: It has a colourful body, but it is essentially a Chinese pen. Rosenberg is playing on the fact that the original Esies were American made, but I doubt his pens ever saw America before they were landed as finished products.
So you are paying a premium for a colourful body, a doubtful nib and nothing that resembles the spirit of the original brand.
The USA Today article is just a PR article and probably paid for by the company.

earthdawn
February 7th, 2015, 03:09 AM
I guess I will chime in with my thoughts and get off the fence post.....

When I heard Esterbrook was being brought back to life I thought " WOOT WOOT ... yea baby!!!"

Then I though about Wahl~Eversharp and what an amazing job Syd did doing it right.

Then I saw the pens Esterbrook was bring out .... then I read some of the Facebook comments and then after all that I heard about the Anderson's treatment.

Now I am just bummed

What a terrible shame to see such a wonderful opportunity wasted.

Silverbreeze
February 7th, 2015, 07:42 AM
My honest and Humble opinion

Syd is one of us. Like the Andersons and the Goulets

This Esterbrook thing is a money grab. Hey we own a pen factory how can we up profit margins?

Let's revive this American icon. We won't get any vets really. But we already need to compete with Mont Blanc for them.

Let's get the younger generation that wants time away from all their screens

What you have just read is a rough imagining of a meeting on the buying of the Esterbrook brand and the creation of the new Esterbrook J. By an amateur author of fiction.

Any resemblance to actual events.
Means real life is imitating art again. And like a Bond flick, the villains are for the most part predictable.

TerraNoir
February 8th, 2015, 09:21 AM
Well, not knowing the people involved, I guess the main thing for potential purchasers would be, what are the pens like? I thought the Andersons' review gives balanced insight into the pens they tried. And I thought the other links contained some thoughtful opinions as well.

I think there are two issues at play in this general subject, with regard to the postings in various pen fora: how good are the pens actually, as writing instruments, and how well has the company producing all of this reflected on the original brand.

Well, you can see many people's subjective opinions on just looking at the designs and features of the pens in many of these threads, but it is just very recently do we have hands-on reviews, like the Anderson's, of them. So we are now starting to get the functional aspects, and this will gradually spread out and give some kind of idea-before-buying.

To be honest, most of the writings - and gnashing of teeth - ends up in two ways: "they sure as hell didn't do justice to the Esterbrook name, they don't look like Esties, they're cheap Chinese-type pens with a name etched on..." and etc. That, again, is subjective but understandable, being that Esties are so revered for both people who used them long ago, and certainly as valued 'starter' vintage pens, and easily serviced and collectible pens. Many feel that there is virtually *no* connection to the name, save for the crass angle of just using the name as a marketing ploy.

Which leads to the last element, the owner of the company and main antagonist in our story, Mr. Rosenberg. If you like, follow the link below (a thread on FPN). There has been a lot of interaction between he and potential users, and this was initiated by their posting on Facebook, a very public forum. They invited comments, but then they did a horrendous job of dealing with that. Way too much for me to catalog here, but ample examples of a person who is ill-equipped to deal with the public, and - as Leigh Reyes pointed out - a stunning example of how NOT to launch a company in this era, and a textbook case in mishandling marketing and social media. There are anecdotal stories in the FPN thread documenting this man's mishandling of earlier "revivals" (the Esties aren't the first!), and my bottom line is that if this guy has launched unhinged attacks on the phone against someone like Lisa Anderson, not once but twice, he really isn't playing with a full deck.

There. That was a lot of typing. ;)

You can check out the FPN thread here (http://www.fountainpennetwork.com/forum/index.php/topic/277581-esterbrook-brand-being-revived-this-december/), but the last couple pages would highlight the recent events well enough. Off to the gym...

I will have to say that I would never purchase these pens. I have been watching from the sidelines and its quite disappointing to see what the products have become. Perhaps he should have listen to the collectors. But someone will probably end up purchasing these pens. Which, IMHO, is rather disappointing. I would never actually purchase these pens simply out of principle. This guy launches unhinged attacks on someone very near and dear to the fountain pen community like Lisa Anderson. Well, sir, you have lost a customer. I am a creature of habit and I rarely if ever go out into the pen purchasing tundra. I'm quite loyal to the places I purchase from. Basically saying...if its not at Anderson Pens, Goulet or Jet Pens...more than likely I probably won't be making a purchase. Unless the happen chance that I see a vendor at a pen show. Though my recent introduction to Vanness Pens at the DC Pen Show will probably add their store to my roster. So the "revived" Esterbrook burnt their bridge with me by not allowing Anderson Pens to carry them. Should they muse their way into my other frequent stores...I still won't buy.

Really really sad what they did. Basically taking a brand and using just the name for profit. That's the last of my two cents. And I'll go tuck my soap box away for another rainy day.

Neo
February 8th, 2015, 09:49 AM
Well, not knowing the people involved, I guess the main thing for potential purchasers would be, what are the pens like? I thought the Andersons' review gives balanced insight into the pens they tried. And I thought the other links contained some thoughtful opinions as well.

I think there are two issues at play in this general subject, with regard to the postings in various pen fora: how good are the pens actually, as writing instruments, and how well has the company producing all of this reflected on the original brand.

Well, you can see many people's subjective opinions on just looking at the designs and features of the pens in many of these threads, but it is just very recently do we have hands-on reviews, like the Anderson's, of them. So we are now starting to get the functional aspects, and this will gradually spread out and give some kind of idea-before-buying.

To be honest, most of the writings - and gnashing of teeth - ends up in two ways: "they sure as hell didn't do justice to the Esterbrook name, they don't look like Esties, they're cheap Chinese-type pens with a name etched on..." and etc. That, again, is subjective but understandable, being that Esties are so revered for both people who used them long ago, and certainly as valued 'starter' vintage pens, and easily serviced and collectible pens. Many feel that there is virtually *no* connection to the name, save for the crass angle of just using the name as a marketing ploy.

Which leads to the last element, the owner of the company and main antagonist in our story, Mr. Rosenberg. If you like, follow the link below (a thread on FPN). There has been a lot of interaction between he and potential users, and this was initiated by their posting on Facebook, a very public forum. They invited comments, but then they did a horrendous job of dealing with that. Way too much for me to catalog here, but ample examples of a person who is ill-equipped to deal with the public, and - as Leigh Reyes pointed out - a stunning example of how NOT to launch a company in this era, and a textbook case in mishandling marketing and social media. There are anecdotal stories in the FPN thread documenting this man's mishandling of earlier "revivals" (the Esties aren't the first!), and my bottom line is that if this guy has launched unhinged attacks on the phone against someone like Lisa Anderson, not once but twice, he really isn't playing with a full deck.

There. That was a lot of typing. ;)

You can check out the FPN thread here (http://www.fountainpennetwork.com/forum/index.php/topic/277581-esterbrook-brand-being-revived-this-december/), but the last couple pages would highlight the recent events well enough. Off to the gym...

I will have to say that I would never purchase these pens. I have been watching from the sidelines and its quite disappointing to see what the products have become. Perhaps he should have listen to the collectors. But someone will probably end up purchasing these pens. Which, IMHO, is rather disappointing. I would never actually purchase these pens simply out of principle. This guy launches unhinged attacks on someone very near and dear to the fountain pen community like Lisa Anderson. Well, sir, you have lost a customer. I am a creature of habit and I rarely if ever go out into the pen purchasing tundra. I'm quite loyal to the places I purchase from. Basically saying...if its not at Anderson Pens, Goulet or Jet Pens...more than likely I probably won't be making a purchase. Unless the happen chance that I see a vendor at a pen show. Though my recent introduction to Vanness Pens at the DC Pen Show will probably add their store to my roster. So the "revived" Esterbrook burnt their bridge with me by not allowing Anderson Pens to carry them. Should they muse their way into my other frequent stores...I still won't buy.

Really really sad what they did. Basically taking a brand and using just the name for profit. That's the last of my two cents. And I'll go tuck my soap box away for another rainy day.


If I heard correctly, the video the Anderson's made hinted that the issue was the new "Esterbrook" company used one of the photos from the Esterbrook.net site without permission and that became a sticking point. Just my humble opinion that this company does not represent the fountain pen hobby well and sees them as just another commodity......they could just as well sell blue jeans or ballpoints, for that matter.

Scrawler
February 8th, 2015, 10:39 AM
I like the acrylics these pens are made of, and I do not mind them being made in China. If they had continued the Esterbrook tradition and made C/C pens with compatible screw in nibs units, I would be looking at them. The screw in nib unit provides for the possibility of making "luxury" nib units with gold nibs, as well as a range of nib types that are popular today, such as italics and stubs. If I could buy a modern pen that had the same general shape, size and function of a traditional J model, with C/C in these acrylics, I would be queuing up to buy one of each of the colour schemes.

Farmboy
February 8th, 2015, 10:35 PM
Well, not knowing the people involved, I guess the main thing for potential purchasers would be, what are the pens like? I thought the Andersons' review gives balanced insight into the pens they tried. And I thought the other links contained some thoughtful opinions as well.

I think there are two issues at play in this general subject, with regard to the postings in various pen fora: how good are the pens actually, as writing instruments, and how well has the company producing all of this reflected on the original brand.

Well, you can see many people's subjective opinions on just looking at the designs and features of the pens in many of these threads, but it is just very recently do we have hands-on reviews, like the Anderson's, of them. So we are now starting to get the functional aspects, and this will gradually spread out and give some kind of idea-before-buying.

To be honest, most of the writings - and gnashing of teeth - ends up in two ways: "they sure as hell didn't do justice to the Esterbrook name, they don't look like Esties, they're cheap Chinese-type pens with a name etched on..." and etc. That, again, is subjective but understandable, being that Esties are so revered for both people who used them long ago, and certainly as valued 'starter' vintage pens, and easily serviced and collectible pens. Many feel that there is virtually *no* connection to the name, save for the crass angle of just using the name as a marketing ploy.

Which leads to the last element, the owner of the company and main antagonist in our story, Mr. Rosenberg. If you like, follow the link below (a thread on FPN). There has been a lot of interaction between he and potential users, and this was initiated by their posting on Facebook, a very public forum. They invited comments, but then they did a horrendous job of dealing with that. Way too much for me to catalog here, but ample examples of a person who is ill-equipped to deal with the public, and - as Leigh Reyes pointed out - a stunning example of how NOT to launch a company in this era, and a textbook case in mishandling marketing and social media. There are anecdotal stories in the FPN thread documenting this man's mishandling of earlier "revivals" (the Esties aren't the first!), and my bottom line is that if this guy has launched unhinged attacks on the phone against someone like Lisa Anderson, not once but twice, he really isn't playing with a full deck.

There. That was a lot of typing. ;)

You can check out the FPN thread here (http://www.fountainpennetwork.com/forum/index.php/topic/277581-esterbrook-brand-being-revived-this-december/), but the last couple pages would highlight the recent events well enough. Off to the gym...

I will have to say that I would never purchase these pens. I have been watching from the sidelines and its quite disappointing to see what the products have become. Perhaps he should have listen to the collectors. But someone will probably end up purchasing these pens. Which, IMHO, is rather disappointing. I would never actually purchase these pens simply out of principle. This guy launches unhinged attacks on someone very near and dear to the fountain pen community like Lisa Anderson. Well, sir, you have lost a customer. I am a creature of habit and I rarely if ever go out into the pen purchasing tundra. I'm quite loyal to the places I purchase from. Basically saying...if its not at Anderson Pens, Goulet or Jet Pens...more than likely I probably won't be making a purchase. Unless the happen chance that I see a vendor at a pen show. Though my recent introduction to Vanness Pens at the DC Pen Show will probably add their store to my roster. So the "revived" Esterbrook burnt their bridge with me by not allowing Anderson Pens to carry them. Should they muse their way into my other frequent stores...I still won't buy.

Really really sad what they did. Basically taking a brand and using just the name for profit. That's the last of my two cents. And I'll go tuck my soap box away for another rainy day.


If I heard correctly, the video the Anderson's made hinted that the issue was the new "Esterbrook" company used one of the photos from the Esterbrook.net site without permission and that became a sticking point. Just my humble opinion that this company does not represent the fountain pen hobby well and sees them as just another commodity......they could just as well sell blue jeans or ballpoints, for that matter.

And from several other sources...all without permission.

00Photo
February 9th, 2015, 01:24 AM
I have been following this on social media outlets and I can say wholeheartedly I wil never ever, ever ever, ever buy one of these pens. ever.

An axiom I believe in is "Always buy the seller". In this case I will pass.

Scrawler
February 9th, 2015, 08:07 AM
I have been following this on social media outlets and I can say wholeheartedly I wil never ever, ever ever, ever buy one of these pens. ever.

An axiom I believe in is "Always buy the seller". In this case I will pass.

Ethical behaviour is very important to me, which is probably why my ventures have not been resounding successes. I find myself agreeing with the "never, ever, ever" bit, not because of the pen itself, but because of the treatment of the Anderson's intellectual property.

reprieve
February 9th, 2015, 05:47 PM
I find myself agreeing with the "never, ever, ever" bit, not because of the pen itself, but because of the treatment of the Anderson's intellectual property.

This sums it up for me. I was not impressed with the pens, but I understood that they had no connection to the original Esterbrook brand. They didn't appeal to me but I could see how they might appeal to others. It was the bizarre and rude treatment of potential customers (read the thread in the other place! to the point of insulting phone calls! good grief!) as well as the blatant theft of multiple people's images--and the subsequent lack of remorse to put it mildly--that put me off that company permanently.

mommalisa
February 18th, 2015, 08:04 PM
As part of Vanness; I can tell you they won't be on our pen roster. Look at the clips. Then look at the Conklin clips from 2002 ish.... The list goes on and on.
I don't think the owners of the NEW Esterbrook company are seeking vendors; they have misread their audience and disrespected the pen community.

mrcharlie
February 21st, 2015, 04:37 PM
Caveat to answer, because apparently the Wahl-Eversharp name has had continuous active ownership if not active product for many years, but you can see the phoenixing of a seemingly long-gone pen brand done rather well by looking at what Syd has done.

I actually have ballpoint pen refills that were sold under the Eversharp brand name and logo from less than ten years ago (the package says "(c) 1997" but I know I purchased it in 2006 or 2007, so they were selling refills with this logo for at least a decade). Whatever company/people owned the name did have "product"; it just wasn't fountain pens.

Uncle Bud
April 5th, 2015, 10:57 AM
Unless you are going to revive this brand producing pens that look like the originals using modern parts and techniques, aka Eversharp Skyline, what's the point. I recently picked up a Levenger True Writer, which in my opinion is the most Esterbrookish pen I have seen.

Scrawler
April 5th, 2015, 11:43 AM
I do not often look at a pen and think to myself "I really don't want it".

SteveE
April 8th, 2015, 07:42 AM
I do not often look at a pen and think to myself "I really don't want it".

This is one of those cases where I look at the item and conclude not "I really don't want it" but instead I conclude "I really want not to have it." Subtle difference, but a stronger reaction for me.