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Thread: War Stories

  1. #101
    Senior Member SIR's Avatar
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    Cool Re: War Stories

    "A veteran is someone who has served in the armed forces for at least one day. There are around 2.6 million veterans in the UK. When servicemen and women leave the armed forces, their healthcare is the responsibility of the NHS." (the same as any other citizen/resident of the UK...)
    https://www.nhs.uk/NHSEngland/Milita.../veterans.aspx

    On the flip-side...
    https://thewaltercumpershunterclub.wordpress.com

  2. #102
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    Default Re: War Stories

    Thank you to all the brave men and women who valiantly tortured completely innocent people based on their name. Special thanks to supreme court of justice judge Antonin Scalia who realized torture works, despite all scientific evidence, because he saw it works on tv show 24. You are true patriots!


  3. #103
    Senior Member SIR's Avatar
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    Default Re: War Stories

    Quote Originally Posted by adhoc View Post
    Thank you to all the brave men and women who valiantly tortured completely innocent people based on their name. Special thanks to supreme court of justice judge Antonin Scalia who realized torture works, despite all scientific evidence, because he saw it works on tv show 24. You are true patriots!

    I'd definitely take Stammheim over Guantanamo any day, but i wouldn't want Jean-Paul Sartre being allowed in to visit me!

  4. #104
    Senior Member Pterodactylus's Avatar
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    Default Re: War Stories

    OK here is another war story as this thread seems not want to die.

    In 1792 this man died at age of 32 defending his people and country against technological far superior invaders which outnumbered the inhabitants of the north american subcontinent by far.
    The invaders stolen everything from the native inhabitants, destroyed their livelihood, commited genocide and annihilated almost all members of the native inhabitants.



    Quote 029 by Ptero Pterodactylus, auf Flickr

    (Croxley - Dickinson ..... Diamine Calligraphy Passion)



    Hmmmm, seems that nothing really changed since then.
    History is still written by the winners and the viewpoint depends on the side you stand.......
    Last edited by Pterodactylus; June 13th, 2018 at 05:51 AM.

  5. #105
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    Default Re: War Stories

    A personal friend died this week. He served his country and did a tour in Vietnam in the Army. In his later years, he was part of the "Volleys for Veterans", a group of former military men who performed the part of the honor guard at the funerals of veterans.

    Requiescat in pace, amicus.
    “Non nobis solum nati sumus." ― Marcus Tullius Cicero

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  7. #106
    Senior Member dneal's Avatar
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    Default Re: War Stories

    Ferchrissakes, take your one-sided political commentary to the politics forum. Taking a dump in this thread just makes you look like a douche.

    VertOlive - Sorry about your friend.

    Trump.jpg
    Last edited by dneal; June 22nd, 2018 at 06:14 PM.

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  9. #107
    Member Freddie's Avatar
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    Default Re: War Stories

    Quote Originally Posted by dneal View Post
    Ferchrissakes, take your one-sided political commentary to the politics forum. Taking a dump in this thread just makes you look like a douche.

    VertOlive - Sorry about your friend.

    Trump.jpg
    You're a better man than I.....I wouldn't waste my breath on these deadwood mother,,,,,,,

    Fred
    Last edited by Freddie; July 4th, 2018 at 08:27 AM.

  10. #108
    Senior Member dneal's Avatar
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    Default Re: War Stories

    Back on topic...

    In 2004 my Battalion HQ was in Luxembourg. They worked with the U.S. Embassy and Luxembourg government to put on a 60th Anniversary celebration of the deeds of young Americans during the Battle of the Bulge. I was fortunate enough to get to chat with many of these men.

    Battle of Bulge 2004 007.jpg

    One story that sticks in my mind was the answer to the question "how did you stay warm"? That may seem like a strange detail, but anyone who has served and knows how it feels to be at the mercy of the weather understands the significance. December 1944 in Belgium was particularly harsh, with night time temperatures well below freezing. History.com gives this account: "As the battle raged, blizzards and freezing rain often reduced visibility to almost zero. Frost covered much of the soldiers’ equipment, and tanks had to be chiseled out of ice after they froze to the ground overnight. Many wounded soldiers froze to death before they were rescued, and thousands of American G.I.s were eventually treated for cases of frostbite and trench foot." You can also read this veteran's account. Even the best equipped Soldiers had little more than an extra pair of socks, scarf and gloves, and wool trench coat. Lighting a fire could get you killed, either due to the smoke during the day or the light created by the flames at night.

    Anyway, the technique these gentlemen used was: "We would throw a grenade to blast away a clearing in the snow. One guy would spread his trench coat on the frozen ground and lay on it in a sort of fetal position. The other would sit on his hips, and drape his trench coat around them both. We'd take turns like this through the night, pulling guard and getting some sleep".

    That's the sort of thing you don't get in the history books. That's the everyday sacrifice these men offered for the liberation of Europe. That's the minor detail that interests a fellow Soldier, equipped with modern kit. Most people today couldn't fathom it.

    Anyway, it was a great event. Clearly this old veteran enjoyed at least a portion of it (one of my favorite pictures).

    Battle of Bulge 2004 009.jpg
    Last edited by dneal; June 23rd, 2018 at 04:30 PM.

  11. #109
    Senior Member pajaro's Avatar
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    Default Re: War Stories

    Quote Originally Posted by dneal View Post
    Back on topic...

    In 2004 my Battalion HQ was in Luxembourg. They worked with the U.S. Embassy and Luxembourg government to put on a 60th Anniversary celebration of the deeds of young Americans during the Battle of the Bulge. I was fortunate enough to get to chat with many of these men.

    Battle of Bulge 2004 007.jpg

    One story that sticks in my mind was the answer to the question "how did you stay warm"? That may seem like a strange detail, but anyone who has served and knows how it feels to be at the mercy of the weather understands the significance. December 1944 in Belgium was particularly harsh, with night time temperatures well below freezing. History.com gives this account: "As the battle raged, blizzards and freezing rain often reduced visibility to almost zero. Frost covered much of the soldiers’ equipment, and tanks had to be chiseled out of ice after they froze to the ground overnight. Many wounded soldiers froze to death before they were rescued, and thousands of American G.I.s were eventually treated for cases of frostbite and trench foot." You can also read this veteran's account. Even the best equipped Soldiers had little more than an extra pair of socks, scarf and gloves, and wool trench coat. Lighting a fire could get you killed, either due to the smoke during the day or the light created by the flames at night.

    Anyway, the technique these gentlemen used was: "We would throw a grenade to blast away a clearing in the snow. One guy would spread his trench coat on the frozen ground and lay on it in a sort of fetal position. The other would sit on his hips, and drape his trench coat around them both. We'd take turns like this through the night, pulling guard and getting some sleep".

    That's the sort of thing you don't get in the history books. That's the everyday sacrifice these men offered for the liberation of Europe. That's the minor detail that interests a fellow Soldier, equipped with modern kit. Most people today couldn't fathom it.

    Anyway, it was a great event. Clearly this old veteran enjoyed at least a portion of it (one of my favorite pictures).

    Battle of Bulge 2004 009.jpg
    Exactly. Great story. I envied those guys who could still fit into their uniforms. I need to lose four more inches from my waist, but the shirts still fit. I gave most of the uniforms to my cousins. I saved a couple of missile blue fatigues to work on my car.
    Last edited by pajaro; June 27th, 2018 at 01:26 PM.

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