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Thread: Metal bodied, wood or plastic?

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    Senior Member suzy01's Avatar
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    Default Metal bodied, wood or plastic?

    I was recently in the market for a mechanical pencil, I held a metal one in a shop and couldn't believe how heavy it was. I went for plastic fantastic rotring tikky in 0.5mm (but swapped out the lead for 2b). It's fantastic and it suits me perfectly. So my question is, are the metal ones just for show or for people with really strong hands? What is you favorite pencil and why?

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    Senior Member Deb's Avatar
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    Default Re: Metal bodied, wood or plastic?

    Not all the metal ones are heavy. I have a Staedtler 925 25-20 that's very light.
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    Default Re: Metal bodied, wood or plastic?

    +1 with Deb.
    The heavy weights are for my desk when I am using them. The light weight ones are with me in my shirt pocket or T-shirt pocket. They are that light. When I was working, it was my Rotring 800+ as our company uses iPads and iPhones. Now that Iím retired the 800+ just sits. I use and write with all my stuff.
    Mechanical pencils ;
    Rotring 800+ .05 is at .85 ozs
    Spoke 4 .07 is at .58 ozs
    CdA Ecridor .07 is at 1.10 ozs
    CdA Ivanhoe .07 is at 1.41 ozs
    Now in 2mm clutch pencils;
    CdA Mario Botta is at .42 ozs
    CdA 80th anniversary, which is .925 sterling silver is at .95 ozs
    The reason for the heavy ones staying at home isnít because of weight, itís because I know they are safe from me losing them or someone else liking them more than I do.
    0.5mm vs 0.7mm graphite sizes is much like 9mm vs 45acp...they both work if you know what you are doing. - me

    Looking for Caran d'Ache Type 55 2mm set and Rotation .7 pencils.

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    Default Re: Metal bodied, wood or plastic?

    I personally prefer the weight of a metal mechanical pencil, such as my Rotring 800.
    The plastic ones just donít feel as substantial to me, and I donít notice a lot of difference in hand fatigue between them.
    Itís really one of those things that boils down to personal preference I think.

    Slightly off topic, excellent choice going with the 2B lead, I find I much prefer writing with a B or 2B than with standard HB leads.

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    Default Re: Metal bodied, wood or plastic?

    I agree with Deb,not all metal are heavy.

    I rather like them heavy because I don't need to hhold them as firmly as a light one. I have the feeling of just guiding the pencil, not really holding it. But it is quite personal.

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    Default Re: Metal bodied, wood or plastic?

    Some mechanical pencils use a combination of metal and plastic. I have a Pentel PSD5 that features a metal grip, plastic body, and metal core. It has decent weight to it without inducing hand fatigue, featuring a retractable tip. Plus, it's nice to look at.


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    Default Re: Metal bodied, wood or plastic?

    Pentel P200. I have tried others, but the P200 feels right, and everything else (except regular wooden pencils) just feel wrong.

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    Default Re: Metal bodied, wood or plastic?

    I just received my Spoke pencil. It is metal and not as heavy as my Rotring 600. I like the feel of the slightly rough surface on the Spoke a little better too.
    "Tell me, what is it you plan to do with your one wild and precious life"?óMary Oliver

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    Default Re: Metal bodied, wood or plastic?

    I like plastic propelling pencils. Had a metal one that just didn't do it for me.

    I've read there are ebonite propelling pencils, but they cost way too much for my shallow pockets.

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    Default Re: Metal bodied, wood or plastic?

    Quote Originally Posted by VertOlive View Post
    I just received my Spoke pencil. It is metal and not as heavy as my Rotring 600. I like the feel of the slightly rough surface on the Spoke a little better too.
    Is it a Spoke 4 or Spoke 5 that you got? Seems the 5 is lighter than the 4.

    Quote Originally Posted by aquafox View Post
    I like plastic propelling pencils. Had a metal one that just didn't do it for me.

    I've read there are ebonite propelling pencils, but they cost way too much for my shallow pockets.
    Not all metal pencils are heavy. Some are made of aluminum or a metal alloy and are as light as plastic. Tombow is well known for making a wide range of them and with really nice patterns.

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    Senior Member VertOlive's Avatar
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    Default Re: Metal bodied, wood or plastic?

    @myu: Mine is a 5, I liked the concept but not the colors of the 4.
    "Tell me, what is it you plan to do with your one wild and precious life"?óMary Oliver

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    Default Re: Metal bodied, wood or plastic?

    Quote Originally Posted by VertOlive View Post
    @myu: Mine is a 5, I liked the concept but not the colors of the 4.
    Well, with the choices available, you could get it with a medium silver body and either titanium or steel grip, and it would look very much like the color of the Spoke 5.

    See photo -- 1st one is a mock-up combing two options:



    I finally ordered mine. Got one in steel + black, the other in brass + blue.


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    Default Re: Metal bodied, wood or plastic?

    There's also the mixed feeling one, like my Uni Kuru Toga 0.5 in Gunmetal (the barrel seems metalic but I know it's plastic, the gripping area is metal though)
    https://www.jetpens.com/Uni-Kuru-Tog...c-Body/pd/6547

    Comes in at 15 grams

    Though I do not always like the feel of metal, and plastic can seem a little slick, but not always into wood when it might get saturated somehow. Especially in the winter times.

    In those times I really like my vintage mechanical Eversharp in "Rosewood" hard rubber, doesn't get slick like plastic or some wood finishes, not cold/hard like metal, and has a light pleasant feel to it. I'm just stuck with 1.12mm lead with that one.



    So I tend to use that one the most, otherwise my Lamy 2000 0.7 Mechanical Pencil, I don't use the Kuru Toga as much as I thought I would, but it's the one I have for the finest lead size presently (like using the NanoDia leads).

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    Default Re: Metal bodied, wood or plastic?

    My favorite pencils are these two made of tungsten or "wolfram". They're not for everyone, but I like heavy, substantial writing instruments.

    The smaller pencil pictured here was offered on Kickstarter by Karsten Beck. It weighs 59 grams and is 5.12Ē long by 0.35Ē diameter.

    The larger pencil was a special order made by Karsten. It weighs 192 grams (6.8 oz) and is 5.48Ē long and 0.44Ē in diameter.

    Both pencils are made of an alloy of 93% tungsten combined with 6.5% nickel and 1.5% iron. They have a tumbled raw tungsten finish. They also share a ďbolt actionĒ slide advance mechanism for their 0.7mm leads.

    The density of tungsten is about the same as gold. It doesn't tarnish and it's hard enough so wear over time isn't an issue.

    Karsten's workmanship is impressive considering how difficult tungsten is to work with. The bolt action mechanism is very precisely machined resulting in a smooth mechanical feel.

    - Gordon.
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    Default Re: Metal bodied, wood or plastic?

    Quote Originally Posted by suzy01 View Post
    I was recently in the market for a mechanical pencil, I held a metal one in a shop and couldn't believe how heavy it was. I went for plastic fantastic rotring tikky in 0.5mm (but swapped out the lead for 2b). It's fantastic and it suits me perfectly. So my question is, are the metal ones just for show or for people with really strong hands?
    The really heavy ones are for people who don't know any better and use "EDC" forums. They think weight equals quality and don't write or draw very much. If you look at tools for people who know what they are doing and will be drawing or writing all day, then they're super light - because some of the links in muscle chain for writing are very small and and easily fatigued. If an employer issued some of the silly kickstarter pens and pencils I've seen then they'd be setting themselves up for a huge liability suit.

    The people who know most about pencils are actually the Japanese, because kanji don't suit ballpoint (because of start-up smears etc) and so until gel pens, mechanical pencils were the best option for note taking in class, etc. So Pentel invented modern mechanical pencil leads with polymer strengtheners, etc. Probably the ultimately ergonomic pencil is the Pentel PG1004 -

    https://www.jetpens.com/Pentel-Graph...0.4-mm/pd/3335

    ..It builds on decades of draftsmens' pencils. It's very light and the subtle grip and tucked away clip make it easy to rotate as you use it - something experienced pencil users learn to do to keep the lead pointed. The 1004 version uses the hipster 0.4mm lead size, which is noticeably thinner than 0.5 but a lot stronger than 0.3. It's a much nicer thing to write with than even a Rotring 600, Pentel Kerry or Kurutoga. (But choosing the right lead counts for a lot too - they vary just as much as fp ink.) The grip's as positive as a checkered metal one but doesn't resist deliberate rotation to the same degree - so if you're writing with a pencil all day, it's a lot less irritating.
    Last edited by ilikenails; January 29th, 2019 at 06:43 AM.

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    Senior Member FredRydr's Avatar
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    Default Re: Metal bodied, wood or plastic?

    Quote Originally Posted by suzy01 View Post
    ...What is you favorite pencil and why?
    Sorry, but notwithstanding all the pretty mechanical versions out there (vintage and modern), my favorite remains the ubiquitous easily-sharpened Ticonderoga No. 2:


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    Default Re: Metal bodied, wood or plastic?

    I have a few mechanical pencils, but seem to only use two -

    Lamy 2000 0.7 stays at home. Over the decades it has worn as smooth as my L2000 fountain pen.

    Pentel P207 goes out and about with me.

    Both with "Shakesperean" leads (2B).

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    Senior Member Deb's Avatar
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    Default Re: Metal bodied, wood or plastic?

    Plastic for everyday use because it's lightweight but I also appreciate vintage pencils, many of them metal but not especially heavy.
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    Deb
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    Default Re: Metal bodied, wood or plastic?

    For ages I had a Pilot "the shaker", a plastic pencil in black with orange trim. I managed to loose it a couple of years ago and have never found the exact replacement. I still miss it.These days Pilot pencils transparent with rubber grip.

    I have had a couple of Koh-i-Noor push pencils taking varying graphite thickness. There are more metal in them than others, but the deep red outer grip is a sort of plastic. I like a Pelikan push pensil I have too, mostly for the pearly stripes, but it has a nice shape too.

    I have to add, I don't have any exclusive preferance when it comes to material plastic, metal or wood. There are featuers I appreachiate a lot, like the metal bit that slides in on the pencils taking very thin graphite refills. I like regular pencils I have to sharpen too.
    Last edited by arrow; July 21st, 2019 at 05:58 AM.

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