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Thread: Pen materials

  1. #21
    Senior Member Lloyd's Avatar
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    Default Re: Pen materials

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  2. #22
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    Default Re: Pen materials

    Quote Originally Posted by Deb View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Chrissy View Post
    I read online that there are currently only two places left in the world, in China, that make celluloid as it's such a fire hazard. It also shrinks and degrades after time. I would prefer any pen I owned to be made with something else.
    A large proportion of the pens I handle are celluloid. After 80 years they are still in good condition. Shrinkage applies to cheaper pens, I find.
    My experience agrees with Deb's. Celluloid pens of high quality such as from Conklin Toledo (not Conklin Chicago) shows no shrinkage and looks amazing even today. Shrinkage is more of a problem for plastics *after* celluloid is not longer used.

    Another example is Parker Vacumatic, one of the most popular pen in the world, is made with celluloid and having restored a lot, I've yet to see one with shrinkage problem.

    About the only irreversible problem with some celluloid is the "crazing" that you can see on some Wahl Eversharp pens, which is a big pity because their pens are beautiful.
    Last edited by penwash; February 28th, 2019 at 08:32 AM.
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  4. #23
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    Default Re: Pen materials

    Quote Originally Posted by Deb View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Chrissy View Post
    I read online that there are currently only two places left in the world, in China, that make celluloid as it's such a fire hazard. It also shrinks and degrades after time. I would prefer any pen I owned to be made with something else.
    A large proportion of the pens I handle are celluloid. After 80 years they are still in good condition. Shrinkage applies to cheaper pens, I find.
    Where would you rate Omas' modern celluloid? Some of those materials are my all time favorites and it would be a shame if they don't last.

  5. #24
    Senior Member Deb's Avatar
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    Default Re: Pen materials

    Quote Originally Posted by mulrich View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Deb View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Chrissy View Post
    I read online that there are currently only two places left in the world, in China, that make celluloid as it's such a fire hazard. It also shrinks and degrades after time. I would prefer any pen I owned to be made with something else.
    A large proportion of the pens I handle are celluloid. After 80 years they are still in good condition. Shrinkage applies to cheaper pens, I find.
    Where would you rate Omas' modern celluloid? Some of those materials are my all time favorites and it would be a shame if they don't last.
    Sorry, I can't help you there. I don't know those pens.
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    Default Re: Pen materials

    Gosh, what a lot we got.

    Thanks to all contributors.

    I see that Cult Pens currently list Platinum #3776 made from celluloid. I had thought it not used any more because of the spontaneous combustion problem with cine films.

  7. #26
    FPG Donor ♕ Chrissy's Avatar
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    Default Re: Pen materials

    Quote Originally Posted by mulrich View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Deb View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Chrissy View Post
    I read online that there are currently only two places left in the world, in China, that make celluloid as it's such a fire hazard. It also shrinks and degrades after time. I would prefer any pen I owned to be made with something else.
    A large proportion of the pens I handle are celluloid. After 80 years they are still in good condition. Shrinkage applies to cheaper pens, I find.
    Where would you rate Omas' modern celluloid? Some of those materials are my all time favorites and it would be a shame if they don't last.
    It was Omas that I was thinking of. That celluloid does shrink and you can usually see when it has between the cap and the barrel when the pen is capped.
    Regards, Chrissy | My Blog: inkyfountainpens

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    Default Re: Pen materials

    Quote Originally Posted by RWS View Post
    Gosh, what a lot we got.

    Thanks to all contributors.

    I see that Cult Pens currently list Platinum #3776 made from celluloid. I had thought it not used any more because of the spontaneous combustion problem with cine films.
    Modern celluloid is cellulose acetate, which is more stable than vintage cellulose nitrate (the potentially explosive/flammable film stock kind). Wiser heads than mine can explain why, and which kind Platinum uses. http://www.fountainpennetwork.com/fo...-of-celluloid/

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  10. #28
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    Default Re: Pen materials

    Quote Originally Posted by Chrissy View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by mulrich View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Deb View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Chrissy View Post
    I read online that there are currently only two places left in the world, in China, that make celluloid as it's such a fire hazard. It also shrinks and degrades after time. I would prefer any pen I owned to be made with something else.
    A large proportion of the pens I handle are celluloid. After 80 years they are still in good condition. Shrinkage applies to cheaper pens, I find.
    Where would you rate Omas' modern celluloid? Some of those materials are my all time favorites and it would be a shame if they don't last.
    It was Omas that I was thinking of. That celluloid does shrink and you can usually see when it has between the cap and the barrel when the pen is capped.
    This is apparently because of the Chinese outsourcing their supplier did starting in the '90s. Some OMASes less that 3 decades old are already seriously discolored. Those Lucens LEs they made especially seem like horrible buys now.
    Will
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  12. #29
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    Default Re: Pen materials

    OMAS, from 1938, no discoloration, no shrinkage



    Last edited by Wahl; March 1st, 2019 at 01:25 PM.

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    Default Re: Pen materials

    There are currently no modern pens made with funky materials such as Casein, correct?

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    Default Re: Pen materials

    Quote Originally Posted by aquafox View Post
    There are currently no modern pens made with funky materials such as Casein, correct?
    There have been companies in the last 10 years or so that used Casein. Delta, Conway Steward, and ASA in India have used it. It's been available in rod format so custom makers have also made pens with it.

  16. #32
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    Default Re: Pen materials

    A big thank you to all contributors. I think it time to revise the list

    Metals
    Platinum
    Gold
    Silver
    Copper
    Brass
    Bronze
    Pewter
    Aluminium
    Steel
    Titanium

    Non-metals
    Acrylic
    Makrolon (Lamy 2000)
    Precious resin (MB149)
    Celluloid
    Casein
    Delrin (Conid)
    Micarta
    Leather inc shark, snake & ostrich
    Horn
    Glass
    Wood
    Bamboo
    Mother of Pearl
    Shell inc abalone
    Ebonite
    Antler
    Ceramic
    Stone
    Powdered materials in resin - stone, terracotta, lava
    Fibre materials in resin - glass fibre, carbon fibre
    Rubber
    Lacquer

    I'm still searching for a pen made with pure unobtainium.

  17. #33
    Senior Member Wahl's Avatar
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    Default Re: Pen materials

    Leathers and lacquer are only coverings on top of other materials of which the pens are made.

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  19. #34
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    Default Re: Pen materials

    Quote Originally Posted by Wahl View Post
    Leathers and lacquer are only coverings on top of other materials of which the pens are made.
    That's a good point. I had one of the crocodile Wyverns recently and it was on top of celluloid.
    Regards,
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  21. #35
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    Default Re: Pen materials

    Back to the first post of the thread :

    I was wondering what materials the barrels and caps of pens can be made from or covered in.

    I know that it's a very wide description.

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    Default Re: Pen materials


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  24. #37
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    Default Re: Pen materials

    Now there's something different. A concrete pen.

    Thank you for the information. I am going to have to have one of those.

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    Default Re: Pen materials

    Quote Originally Posted by catbert View Post
    That reminds me of this Visconti made with resin and terracotta compound:

    - Will
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  26. #39
    Senior Member fountainpenkid's Avatar
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    Default Re: Pen materials

    I've never seen a pen with that sort of topographical 'contour' design but I love it. It looks large and is quite heavy as you'd expect (45g)!
    Will
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  27. #40
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    Default Re: Pen materials

    There are also a lot of alloys used such as Nickel Silver for instance in the caps of some models of the Aurora 88p
    Its an alloy of copper nickel and zinc (no silver)




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