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Thread: Cultural differences

  1. #21
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    Default Re: Cultural differences

    Quote Originally Posted by ethernautrix View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by adhoc View Post
    Yup, it’s considered very rude to not greet back here. It’s “dober dan” (and yours is dan dobri; dzien dobry), and nasvidenje (dosvidanya in russian or however you spell it). Dovidzenja is in serbocroatian, though (like your do widzenia), meaning “until we meet again”. Are you an immigrant to Poland, by the way? Or why did you find it weird? I definitely get strange looks when I say hello and goodbye in an elevator when foreigners are with me
    I'm an American in the Land of Po (Polska!), so the general greeting was foreign to me.

    I do notice when not-Americans say to me, "Have a nice day!" *smiling*
    What brought you to Poland, if I may ask?

    Quote Originally Posted by jbb View Post
    In this red part of a blue state USA my one neighbor grows pot while another still hasn't taken down his Trump/Pence sign. Everyone (except us) is armed. I smile and give the one-armed wave to my neighbors as a drive down the one-lane road and try to keep my opinions to myself.
    What is it like being around armed people? Over here, nobody can carry a firearm, only police and military. And even with police, I sometimes think to myself...if this guy snaps right now, he could shoot everyone dead right here and right now. Isn't it kind of unpleasant, or do you just get used to it and trust people? I don't think I could ever trust the general populace to this extent, lol.

  2. #22
    Senior Member countrydirt's Avatar
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    Default Re: Cultural differences

    Quote Originally Posted by adhoc View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by ethernautrix View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by adhoc View Post
    Yup, it’s considered very rude to not greet back here. It’s “dober dan” (and yours is dan dobri; dzien dobry), and nasvidenje (dosvidanya in russian or however you spell it). Dovidzenja is in serbocroatian, though (like your do widzenia), meaning “until we meet again”. Are you an immigrant to Poland, by the way? Or why did you find it weird? I definitely get strange looks when I say hello and goodbye in an elevator when foreigners are with me
    I'm an American in the Land of Po (Polska!), so the general greeting was foreign to me.

    I do notice when not-Americans say to me, "Have a nice day!" *smiling*
    What brought you to Poland, if I may ask?

    Quote Originally Posted by jbb View Post
    In this red part of a blue state USA my one neighbor grows pot while another still hasn't taken down his Trump/Pence sign. Everyone (except us) is armed. I smile and give the one-armed wave to my neighbors as a drive down the one-lane road and try to keep my opinions to myself.
    What is it like being around armed people? Over here, nobody can carry a firearm, only police and military. And even with police, I sometimes think to myself...if this guy snaps right now, he could shoot everyone dead right here and right now. Isn't it kind of unpleasant, or do you just get used to it and trust people? I don't think I could ever trust the general populace to this extent, lol.
    From my perspective, I don't even think about it much. My family has always had firearms so it is just a part of life. However, from a school teacher perspective, we seem to think about it more than we ought to have to. I'm realizing that some people can't handle the responsibilities associated with freedoms.

  3. #23
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    Default Re: Cultural differences

    Oh yeah, it's definitely a people problem. I'm not against firearms, I'm actually thinking of signing up to a shooting range here to try it out and see what all the fuss is about. I've never held a firearm before.
    Touching on the school teacher subject...man, that's sad. Really, really sad. Our crime rates are so low (among the lowest in the world, actually) that I've never had to defend myself before and the idea that I'd need a weapon for self defense is such an alien one to me.

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    Default Re: Cultural differences

    I'm currently residing in South Korea. I bet I'm one of the handful people who visits this forum from Korea(including the Northern one).
    I used to live in Auckland, New Zealand merely 4 months ago- Lived for 4yrs then came back to Korea. I even have NZ driver's license as well as a permanent residency. So I can confidently give you information and insights on both of the countries. Speaking of the rights for firearm possession, there is virtually no firearms to be found in Korea except those(The 6 bullet revolvers) used by police and the rifles used by military due to very strict regulations. NO guns can be brought IN or OUT of Korea.
    In New zealand, my friend who used to live at the South side of Auckland called Mangere used to joke about hearing gunshots at night, and I do trust him on that since even drug trading is frequent at that side of Auckland.(I lived at "North" shore)
    So I'd say posession of firearm is quite illegal there except for the south Auckland that is "dangerous". Even so there is something called firearm license, and one of my friends even had a locked cabinet with a shotgun and these old ass guns made out of wood that his family use to hunt once in a while. I indeed was jealous of that. Although posession of firearms is illegal in both countries that i lived in, I have quite positive views on firearms since firearms are very effective when it comes to self defence.- You can actually "shoot back".
    In worst case scenario, you could very well be unarmed and your aggressor may be armed. In that case, you will be robbed or shot, or very likely both.
    If firearms are legal, you can at least shoot before he pulls the trigger. But because of these "fked up in the head" people who shoots up schools and concerts, I don't think gun control will ever be removed in countries that has them right now.

    I've visited a firing range when I visited Viet nam/HCM a few years ago and tried a magazine of M16. It was well, just as anyone would've anticipated, loud. But the recoil was something new, as I couldn't steady my aim because of it and it was defo more than just a "crosshair going up" in games. To put it easily, think of Newton's third law. The bullet has a massive momentum, and that sheer momentum comes back to the stock and into your shoulder. If you weren't fit or had bad posture uncorrected by the supervisor I could see how it can dislocate your shoulder. So according to my experience, firing guns is ehh... Not that fun, to say the least. It's not like my dream is to be a sharpshooter in military. People should keep in mind that firing a gun aiming at people can very well take their lives, and use the guns only when they are the ones that are in the danger. Only if less people use guns to take innocent lives then guns MIGHT be legal in more countries.
    Last edited by Mikekwon; Yesterday at 11:21 AM.

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    Default Re: Cultural differences

    I hope this doesn't descend into a for and against firearms thread. That's what the rest of the Internet is for.

    I think the thing about greeting people in the street is interesting. It's mosty a city vs small town thing, I think. Where I lived before, in a fishing village, you greeted everyone even if you didn't actually know them. Unless they were tourists, of course. They were recognisable because they were (a) better dressed and (b) looked in shop windows.
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    Senior Member Voiren's Avatar
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    Default Re: Cultural differences

    We've had an ongoing speculation that things like frequency of talking to strangers on the train or in public is inversely proportional to the amount of personal space you have - on the Tube at rush hour you're desperately pretending you don't have your face in someone's armpit... And in London in general there are so many people that you ignore everyone unless you have a really good reason not to.

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    Default Re: Cultural differences

    Quote Originally Posted by Voiren View Post
    We've had an ongoing speculation that things like frequency of talking to strangers on the train or in public is inversely proportional to the amount of personal space you have - on the Tube at rush hour you're desperately pretending you don't have your face in someone's armpit... And in London in general there are so many people that you ignore everyone unless you have a really good reason not to.
    Honestly, that sounds a bit like hell and extremely alienating. But I get it. I've been to Tokyo, and there's no way there's any room for humanity at such crowds.

    Quote Originally Posted by Deb View Post
    I hope this doesn't descend into a for and against firearms thread. That's what the rest of the Internet is for.
    Agreed. It would be a waste of what seems like a very good thread in the making

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