Page 1 of 7 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 129

Thread: An invitation to fly.

  1. #1
    Senior Member Ramón Campos's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Posts
    293
    Thanks
    36
    Thanked 74 Times in 42 Posts
    Rep Power
    0

    Default An invitation to fly.

    Kenneth Parker served in the fledgling naval air service* as a pilot in Pensacola, Fl., during WWI and was so interested in aviation that, after the war, he considered becoming U.S. Mail pilot before opting definitely for the family business to which he transmitted this passion for flying.

    There were many aircraft related to Parker Pen Co. from its first bussines plane Duofold Fairchild cabin craft to a DC-3 through the Parker Spitfire donated to the R.A.F. during WWII.

    Let's see something of them!






    *When the Royal Naval Air Service and the Royal Flying Corps were merged into the fledgling Royal Air Force.

    To be continued...
    Last edited by Ramón Campos; June 21st, 2019 at 02:10 AM.

  2. The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to Ramón Campos For This Useful Post:

    BlkWhiteFilmPix (June 21st, 2019), fountainpagan (June 24th, 2019), jacksterp (June 21st, 2019), Lady Onogaro (June 23rd, 2019), Robert (June 21st, 2019)

  3. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    Dallas, as in the 80's TV Series
    Posts
    2,267
    Thanks
    1,574
    Thanked 2,725 Times in 994 Posts
    Rep Power
    6

    Default Re: An invitation to fly.

    Do you know Len Provisor of Pentrace?

    He has extensive knowledge about Parker's airplanes and built their models.
    - Will
    A new place to shop for restored vintage pens: Redeem Pens

  4. The Following User Says Thank You to penwash For This Useful Post:

    Ramón Campos (June 21st, 2019)

  5. #3
    Senior Member Ramón Campos's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Posts
    293
    Thanks
    36
    Thanked 74 Times in 42 Posts
    Rep Power
    0

    Default Re: An invitation to fly.

    Quote Originally Posted by penwash View Post
    Do you know Len Provisor of Pentrace?
    No, I reside abroad and do not know Len Provisor but I suppose him very, very well informed because I have seen images of him with Geoffrey Parker. If he could intervene in the thread I will feel very flattered.

    Tomorrow I will upload some images christening this NC-8025 Parker Duofold airplane, others already in action and some ads.

    Last edited by Ramón Campos; June 21st, 2019 at 12:22 PM.

  6. #4
    Senior Member azkid's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    Colorado, USA
    Posts
    1,060
    Thanks
    1,836
    Thanked 927 Times in 427 Posts
    Rep Power
    3

    Default Re: An invitation to fly.

    Meanwhile here's a pen trace pst about the Duofold plane.

    http://www.newpentrace.com/article100100002.html

    Also there's a model on ebay right now.

  7. The Following User Says Thank You to azkid For This Useful Post:

    Ramón Campos (June 22nd, 2019)

  8. #5
    Senior Member Ramón Campos's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Posts
    293
    Thanks
    36
    Thanked 74 Times in 42 Posts
    Rep Power
    0

    Default Re: An invitation to fly.

    Quote Originally Posted by azkid View Post
    Meanwhile here's a pen trace pst about the Duofold plane. http://www.newpentrace.com/article100100002.html
    Interesting. As I enjoy so much with anecdotal and intra-history I would highlight this paragraph:

    "This same promotional stunt was repeated in England, with a smaller similarly decorated DeHavilland taking the place of the Duofold plane, English crowds considered this stunt a typical example of American excess, and were not overly impressed."

    And it is possible that the astute and wise English knew that for that experiment did not need such a show like this because it was the same to throw the Duofolds from the second or third floor of any building (1).

    (1) I invite and encourage to aeronautical engineer, physicist or parachutist Duofellows will inform us about terminal velocity and how air friction stabilize the velocity.
    Last edited by Ramón Campos; June 22nd, 2019 at 03:59 AM.

  9. #6
    Senior Member Ramón Campos's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Posts
    293
    Thanks
    36
    Thanked 74 Times in 42 Posts
    Rep Power
    0

  10. #7
    Senior Member Ramón Campos's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Posts
    293
    Thanks
    36
    Thanked 74 Times in 42 Posts
    Rep Power
    0

    Default Re: An invitation to fly.


    The famous air pioneer Amelia Earhart prepares to christen the Fairchild FC-2W2 Parker Duofold NC-8025. Municipal airport, Chicago, Ill. late November 1928.


    Dropping Duofolds.


    Promoting Parker Duofold in university environments.

    To be continued...
    Last edited by Ramón Campos; June 22nd, 2019 at 05:23 AM.

  11. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    353
    Thanks
    105
    Thanked 85 Times in 65 Posts
    Rep Power
    3

    Default Re: An invitation to fly.

    You asked -

    I invite and encourage to aeronautical engineer, physicist or parachutist Duofellows will inform us about terminal velocity and how air friction stabilize the velocity.


    Velocity is usually expressed to two ways, both are very simple if you were taught ( Basic physics ).

    Terminal velocity :
    D = W
    Cd * r * V ^2 * A / 2 = W

    Vertical velocity

    V = sqrt ( (2 * W) / (Cd * r * A)


    I have no idea what this has to do with Parker pens ?
    Last edited by proteus; June 22nd, 2019 at 02:09 PM.

  12. #9
    Senior Member Ramón Campos's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Posts
    293
    Thanks
    36
    Thanked 74 Times in 42 Posts
    Rep Power
    0

    Default Re: An invitation to fly.

    @Proteus. Sir, be patient and wait for an aeronautical engineer, physicist or parachutist, with practical experience, to explain this. It has to do, not with the Duofolds, but with English´s skepticism before this "unnecessary"show because the speed is stabilized and it is almost the same to throw the Duofolds from 3,000 feet that throw it from Janesville´s terrace u other building. But let it be explained verbally, without the need to calculate coefficients, weights or densities nor solve the well known equation, by someone who knows what we are talking about. Do not worry, this will be explained in an intelligible way; leave time to time.
    Last edited by Ramón Campos; June 23rd, 2019 at 01:35 AM.

  13. #10
    Senior Member FredRydr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Carlisle, Pennsylvania USA
    Posts
    2,386
    Thanks
    479
    Thanked 2,391 Times in 1,023 Posts
    Rep Power
    9

    Default Re: An invitation to fly.

    Let me guess. The only person who can explain everything is Lazard with his copied images (see “caught red-handed” in another thread).

  14. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    SFO USA
    Posts
    966
    Thanks
    14
    Thanked 780 Times in 397 Posts
    Rep Power
    7

    Default Re: An invitation to fly.

    Quote Originally Posted by FredRydr View Post
    Let me guess. The only person who can explain everything is Lazard with his copied images (see “caught red-handed” in another thread).
    That red hand can be fixed in Photoshop...

  15. #12
    Senior Member Ramón Campos's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Posts
    293
    Thanks
    36
    Thanked 74 Times in 42 Posts
    Rep Power
    0

    Default Re: An invitation to fly.

    The explanation that an aeronautical engineer and parachutist with more than 100 jumps send me by PM about why the British were not impressed and they could have considered excessive the show of launching the Duofolds from the airplane.

    " From what I've (misleadingly) read - because there is nothing to grab to - the "Big Red Drop" has a lot of captiousness.
    The falling in vacuum is continuously accelerated: v = g · t (speed = gravity x time), with "g" being 9,81 m/sec2. More time, and the faster it goes. That's what happens with satellites and meteorites, that enter our atmosphere like a tiger with a burning tail.
    But they enter the atmosphere, and it does something: it rubs, heats and slows. Plain old friction.
    When you do a manual parachute jump, you delay opening and meanwhile "free-fall". At the very beginning of the jump you "feel you fall" because there is acceleration, but very quickly it disappears as air stabilizes your speed with drag, and from there on you feel like Superman, "flying". Mind the word "feeling", because you're really "falling" like a bathtub.
    A human body, horizontal with arms extended, will not exceed 200 km/h, but this depends on the shape, and a water drop will impact the ground at about 32 km/h. (thank Goodness, or otherwise rain or hail would kill us!)
    Back to the topic thread: a fountain pen is closer to the water drop, and we may suppose it falls at 30-32 Km/h.
    That means its speed stabilizes in 0,85-0,90 seconds, having fell 3,5-4 meters.

    The rest of the fall is irrelevant for speed, but not for propaganda.

    That is to say: they could have skipped leaving Janesville, and just threw the pen through the first-floor window."


    This is independent of the advertising campaign and its benefits that were excellent, very intelligent and successful.

    Addendum. To those who have dropped a fountain pen from their hands, less than 2 meters high, we know that a vacumatic can be broken in two by one of the colored rings and a Duofold can break cap mouth (both things have happened to me)
    Last edited by Ramón Campos; June 23rd, 2019 at 10:56 AM.

  16. #13
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    353
    Thanks
    105
    Thanked 85 Times in 65 Posts
    Rep Power
    3

    Default Re: An invitation to fly.

    Ramón

    Sir,

    I would like to say I actually like your posts, they are always interesting.


    As for the equations of velocity - I can explain in depth, but I doubt anyone would wish to hear them.
    ( Until yesterday I have not revisited the physics I was taught at school.
    The source of my equations is NASA , they possibly know a thing or two )

    Do you really think if you dropped 100 pens ( there are only 8 in the photograph shown ) from 3000 feet you would actually find one of them ? ( Wind variations factor )

    You used the words ‘intra-history
    Never heard that term before.
    Was intrigued and looked it up.
    It was used by Spanish philosopher Miguel de Unamuno in his book En torno al casticismo 1895, and never again.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  17. #14
    Senior Member Ramón Campos's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Posts
    293
    Thanks
    36
    Thanked 74 Times in 42 Posts
    Rep Power
    0

    Default Re: An invitation to fly.

    Quote Originally Posted by proteus View Post
    [I][COLOR="#000080"]Ramón, You used the words ‘intra-history‘ Never heard that term before.Was intrigued and looked it up.It was used by Spanish philosopher Miguel de Unamuno in his book En torno al casticismo 1895, and never again.
    You´re right, Sir; intrahistory (intrahistoria) is a term introduced by Unamuno (1864-1936). It has an exact definition in Spanish but colloquially I refer to this as the anecdotal and the little things of the History. Somehow, we could say that History is the things that happen and appear in newspaper headlines and, in contrast, Intrahistory is the little things that happen, do not appear in the headlines but often shape the History.

    They give you the History written; Intrahistory you have to look for it.

    And I like intrahistory because I agree with the poet:

    I don´t know many things, it's true.
    I only say what I have seen.
    And I've seen:
    that the cradle of man is moved with story tales,
    that the cries of anguish of man drown them with story tales,
    that the tears of man clog him with story tales,
    that the bones of man bury them with story tales,
    and that man´s fear ...
    has invented all the story tales.
    I don´t know many things, it's true,
    but I have been asleep with all the story tales ...
    And I know all the story tales.

    (León Felipe -1884-1968-, free translation mine).
    Last edited by Ramón Campos; June 24th, 2019 at 01:33 AM.

  18. #15
    Senior Member Ramón Campos's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Posts
    293
    Thanks
    36
    Thanked 74 Times in 42 Posts
    Rep Power
    0

    Default Re: An invitation to fly.

    Let´s see the Parker Duofold Fairchild monoplane Wasp engine with its characteristics.

    These are similar Fairchild monoplane models, this one with folding wings as the Duofold

    Spitfire folding wings Lazard.jpg

    Fairchild 71 monoplane characteristics Lazard.jpg

    Fairchild 71 Wasp engine ad.jpg

    Fairchild ad.jpg

    To be continued...
    Last edited by Ramón Campos; June 24th, 2019 at 09:11 AM.

  19. #16
    Senior Member Ramón Campos's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Posts
    293
    Thanks
    36
    Thanked 74 Times in 42 Posts
    Rep Power
    0

    Default Re: An invitation to fly.

    The Parker Duofold Fairchild maneuvering at the airfield
    .



    To be continued with other Parker´s aircraft...
    Last edited by Ramón Campos; June 24th, 2019 at 12:25 PM.

  20. #17
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    SFO USA
    Posts
    966
    Thanks
    14
    Thanked 780 Times in 397 Posts
    Rep Power
    7

    Default Re: An invitation to fly.

    How about including the reference data and sources of these images?

  21. The Following User Says Thank You to Farmboy For This Useful Post:

    azkid (June 24th, 2019)

  22. #18
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    353
    Thanks
    105
    Thanked 85 Times in 65 Posts
    Rep Power
    3

    Smile Re: An invitation to fly.

    Nice aeroplanes, interesting physics & poem

    and I thought this was a Parker pen forum....smiling

    Perhaps take a little time out and post a photograph of one of your pens, your favourite one.

    I would like to see it.


    Mine is a Parker 61 which I think is the best pen ever made. ( Don Doman's finest hour )
    It just makes me feel so very special.
    ( And I have a very large choice from just about every pen Parker made )
    Last edited by proteus; June 24th, 2019 at 03:30 PM.

  23. #19
    Senior Member Ramón Campos's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Posts
    293
    Thanks
    36
    Thanked 74 Times in 42 Posts
    Rep Power
    0

    Default Re: An invitation to fly.

    Quote Originally Posted by proteus View Post
    Perhaps take a little time out and post a photograph of one of your pens, your favourite one. I would like to see it.
    Being a pen´s forum I always like to keep in mind that it is a people´s forum so the interaction can lead us to marginal issues, although not less interesting.-smiling-. I like to think that a thread belongs to OP ... but only until it is published -smiling-; once opened, it belongs to the readers.

    Answering your question, my favorite ones are Parker Vacumatics (here) and Sheaffer'S Balance (here) it is for that and I have both threads about them at present.

    In normal use, I like to alternate them periodically... but the truth is that a sweet and soft vacumatic india black with silver cap always remains in the old beer jar lined inside that I have as pen holders. So, yes; I must confess that this vac is my "most" favorite (I also facilitate it in dark background in case someone "51"´s lover wants it as a screensaver or similar*). At last I would add that colors of my favorite inks are aquamarines and dark sepia-ochres.


    Aditional note. (*) If any reader wants it with exact size for his screen, please contact me through the messenger and I will gladly send it to him with the exact size.
    Last edited by Ramón Campos; June 25th, 2019 at 01:56 AM.

  24. #20
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    SFO USA
    Posts
    966
    Thanks
    14
    Thanked 780 Times in 397 Posts
    Rep Power
    7

    Default Re: An invitation to fly.

    Quote Originally Posted by Ramón Campos View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by proteus View Post
    Perhaps take a little time out and post a photograph of one of your pens, your favourite one. I would like to see it.
    Being a pen´s forum I always like to keep in mind that it is a forum of people who write about pens - smiling-
    My favorite ones are the Parker Vacumatics (here) and the Sheaffer'S Balance (here) it is for that and I have both threads about them at present. In normal use, I like to alternate them periodically ... but the truth is that the vacumatic india black with silver cap always remains in the old beer jar lined inside that I have for pen holders. So, yes, I will confess that this vac is my "most" favorite.

    Your Vac looks an awful lot like a “51”.

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •