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Thread: 1934 Esterbrook

  1. #21
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    Default Re: 1934 Esterbrook

    Thank you Deb for your use of dry heat. Iíve actually considered, but thought it would be harder on the plastic than very warm water. Good to know.

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    Default Re: 1934 Esterbrook

    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck Naill View Post
    Thank you for your advice. On the Dollar Pens I didnít soak at all because I had heard water and the old rubber donít mix well. I did soak the part that holds the nib and to which the sac is attached.
    If you like to restore pens, it's good to know why they don't mix well:

    Hard rubber parts that is rarely exposed to UV have zero problems with water, for example, your section and your feed. All black and shiny after decades of contact with ink and water.

    On the other hand, hard rubber parts that may have been exposed to a lot of UV (your barrels and caps) will discolor upon contact with water. The black ones will turn brown, the woodgrain ones will become cloudy. The thing is, we can't tell if a nicely black hard rubber pen will discolor or not, so it's best to play it safe, just like what Deb said, just dry heat and patience.
    - Will
    Unique and restored vintage pens: Redeem Pens

  3. The Following User Says Thank You to penwash For This Useful Post:

    Jon Szanto (November 29th, 2019)

  4. #23
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    Default Re: 1934 Esterbrook

    Quote Originally Posted by penwash View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck Naill View Post
    Thank you for your advice. On the Dollar Pens I didnít soak at all because I had heard water and the old rubber donít mix well. I did soak the part that holds the nib and to which the sac is attached.
    If you like to restore pens, it's good to know why they don't mix well:

    Hard rubber parts that is rarely exposed to UV have zero problems with water, for example, your section and your feed. All black and shiny after decades of contact with ink and water.

    On the other hand, hard rubber parts that may have been exposed to a lot of UV (your barrels and caps) will discolor upon contact with water. The black ones will turn brown, the woodgrain ones will become cloudy. The thing is, we can't tell if a nicely black hard rubber pen will discolor or not, so it's best to play it safe, just like what Deb said, just dry heat and patience.
    Again, your advice is most appreciated. Esterbrook pens are the only brand of present interest.

  5. #24
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    Default Re: 1934 Esterbrook

    As an aside, since precise temperature control is critical for some materials, I was happy to finally find my old, bullet style IR thermometer. Using it while heating removes all the guesswork about temperature of the parts being heated.

  6. #25
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    Default Re: 1934 Esterbrook

    Happily, none of the Esterbrook pens have been harmed by a warm water and dawn soak. Considering the number of plastics used today, I cannot imagine this is going to harm even old celluloid or Bakelite, or it hasnít for any of my other vintage interests which utilized the same era materials. That said, I appreciate the expertise provided .

  7. #26
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    Default Re: 1934 Esterbrook

    No water as suggested on this 1934. I post the restored '38 with a just unclogged flat 2556 nib feed. Note the ring on the '38 is higher on the cap body. I used one of my old mandolin strings to perform the unclogging after some soaking in a 1:10 ammonia solution. Right as intended now.

    The classic BHR odor is more noticeable on the lighter shaded '34.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by Chuck Naill; November 30th, 2019 at 04:12 PM.

  8. #27
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    Default Re: 1934 Esterbrook

    I addressed 28 holiday envelopes today with the '38 Dollar Pen flat feed 2556. What a fabulous nib. I have several and enjoy using them all.

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