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Thread: Is anyone here a "cradle" FP user?

  1. #41
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    Default Re: Is anyone here a "cradle" FP user?

    Sort of. I started using FPs in primary school at around age 9 in 1997. I never used ballpoints, but I did switch to rollerballs in college because I always hated ballpoints. Mechanical engineering college - fountain pens were a no go. I did use fountain pens home to turn the scribbles from lectures to nicer and concise write ups at home for learning + it helped me solidify the lectures. I bought myself a "really nice" FP as a reward for finishing master's degree at age 24 - a Pelikan M200. I thought piston filler was the coolest thing I have ever seen in my life then, because all my life all I knew were fountain pens on cartridges - Pelikan royal blue 4001, of course. At the time, I thought the 150 or so was an insane amount of money for a fountain pen.

    Nowadays I can't stand either cartridges or the Pelikan 4001 royal blue ink. I don't think there's objectively anything wrong with either, I just used them exclusively for well over a decade and I'm still sick of them.

  2. #42
    Senior Member welch's Avatar
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    Default Re: Is anyone here a "cradle" FP user?

    Fascinating to read through this thread all at once.

    - So Pajaro remembers the ink-jar inserts being in the top right of desks? I started kindergarten in 1953, and our new formica-and-gray desks had a plastic ink jar on the top left, or so I remember from 67 years ago.

    - We printed in first and second grades, and began writing cursive in the third grade, using pencils. Every classroom had a green or black chart with example cursive upper and lower case letters stripped above the blackboard. In fourth grade, we began using ink. In the US, those grades were "elementary school". In 7th Grade, we went to Junior High School, and in 10th Grade we went to High School. (Some school districts used an older system, in which kids went to elementary school through 8th grade, and then high school in 9th through 12th grades. I think the Junior High was created to keep the puberty-rocked kids in a separate school that could handle our "awakening".)

    How was, and is, the UK school system organized? German schools?

    - Most of us bought our school supplies in the local drug store. A typical US Walgreens or CVS still has a school supplies aisle, although no ink, Sheaffer school pens, or plastic-handled stick pens.

    - Did German kids practice printing in pencil before moving to fountain pens? What sort, or quality, of paper did you use?

    - From 7th Grade onward, I used a Parker 45 that I refilled every day, in the kitchen sink, with Sheaffer Washable Black or Washable Blue-Black. Note: my parents graduated high school in 1940 and 1941, and they had many horror stories of kids ruining clothing with permanent ink. My mother insisted on washable inks, and I liked them because they washed off my hands and out of the sink with no problem. We all learned to protect our three-ring binder and school books from rain storms. Now, I almost instinctively wonder why people demand more-permanent-than-permanent inks, and seem to worry that rain drops are more likely to harm their journals than ink drops are to ruin their clothes.

    - I assume that Jon S wanted to limit his fictional trip to Europe because he had to look up and report on each country he fictionally visited. Certainly would have limited me to as few countries as possible.
    Last edited by welch; June 18th, 2020 at 02:09 PM.

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  4. #43
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    Default Re: Is anyone here a "cradle" FP user?

    Quote Originally Posted by welch View Post
    Now, I almost instinctively wonder why people demand more-permanent-than-permanent inks, and seem to worry that rain drops are more likely to harm their journals than ink drops are to ruin their clothes.
    This may be because now due to "fast fashion" clothes are a) cheap to buy b) out of style quickly and c) cheaply made and won't likely last anyway. But lost writing is gone.

    As an example: an Ocean Pacific tshirt from the early 90s would get you some weird looks if worn today. Not that i think many of them were made well enough to LAST this long.

    so i think the TLDR here is: most people likely already have WAY more clothes than they need, most of them are cheaply made and easily thrown out and replaced with newer ones, therefore they care much less about them than people 60 or more years ago did.

    Lets not forget that some people ALSO wanted permanence back in the day! Parker "51" ink boxes all have "DRIES ALMOST INSTANTLY - COMPLETELY PERMANENT" written on them right on the front. So as far back as 1941, SOME people must have cared more about their writing than replacing a shirt. Mom's who have to replace kids clothes were probably not the target audience, especially given the price of a "51" back then.
    Last edited by INeedAFinancialAdvisor; June 18th, 2020 at 08:14 PM.

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  6. #44
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    Default Re: Is anyone here a "cradle" FP user?

    Quote Originally Posted by welch View Post
    Fascinating to read through this thread all at once.

    - So Pajaro remembers the ink-jar inserts being in the top right of desks? I started kindergarten in 1953, and our new formica-and-gray desks had a plastic ink jar on the top left, or so I remember from 67 years ago.

    - We printed in first and second grades, and began writing cursive in the third grade, using pencils. Every classroom had a green or black chart with example cursive upper and lower case letters stripped above the blackboard. In fourth grade, we began using ink. In the US, those grades were "elementary school". In 7th Grade, we went to Junior High School, and in 10th Grade we went to High School. (Some school districts used an older system, in which kids went to elementary school through 8th grade, and then high school in 9th through 12th grades. I think the Junior High was created to keep the puberty-rocked kids in a separate school that could handle our "awakening".)

    How was, and is, the UK school system organized? German schools?

    - Most of us bought our school supplies in the local drug store. A typical US Walgreens or CVS still has a school supplies aisle, although no ink, Sheaffer school pens, or plastic-handled stick pens.

    - Did German kids practice printing in pencil before moving to fountain pens? What sort, or quality, of paper did you use?

    - From 7th Grade onward, I used a Parker 45 that I refilled every day, in the kitchen sink, with Sheaffer Washable Black or Washable Blue-Black. Note: my parents graduated high school in 1940 and 1941, and they had many horror stories of kids ruining clothing with permanent ink. My mother insisted on washable inks, and I liked them because they washed off my hands and out of the sink with no problem. We all learned to protect our three-ring binder and school books from rain storms. Now, I almost instinctively wonder why people demand more-permanent-than-permanent inks, and seem to worry that rain drops are more likely to harm their journals than ink drops are to ruin their clothes.

    - I assume that Jon S wanted to limit his fictional trip to Europe because he had to look up and report on each country he fictionally visited. Certainly would have limited me to as few countries as possible.
    Clearly I should have gone to a school like yours, with the ink well at the top left corner. Alas, I do remember the ink well at the top right. It was just one thing to overcome, and I didn't realize at the time that there might have been an alternative arrangement.

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  8. #45
    Senior Member welch's Avatar
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    Default Re: Is anyone here a "cradle" FP user?

    Quote Originally Posted by pajaro View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by welch View Post
    Fascinating to read through this thread all at once.

    - So Pajaro remembers the ink-jar inserts being in the top right of desks? I started kindergarten in 1953, and our new formica-and-gray desks had a plastic ink jar on the top left, or so I remember from 67 years ago.

    - We printed in first and second grades, and began writing cursive in the third grade, using pencils. Every classroom had a green or black chart with example cursive upper and lower case letters stripped above the blackboard. In fourth grade, we began using ink. In the US, those grades were "elementary school". In 7th Grade, we went to Junior High School, and in 10th Grade we went to High School. (Some school districts used an older system, in which kids went to elementary school through 8th grade, and then high school in 9th through 12th grades. I think the Junior High was created to keep the puberty-rocked kids in a separate school that could handle our "awakening".)

    How was, and is, the UK school system organized? German schools?

    - Most of us bought our school supplies in the local drug store. A typical US Walgreens or CVS still has a school supplies aisle, although no ink, Sheaffer school pens, or plastic-handled stick pens.

    - Did German kids practice printing in pencil before moving to fountain pens? What sort, or quality, of paper did you use?

    - From 7th Grade onward, I used a Parker 45 that I refilled every day, in the kitchen sink, with Sheaffer Washable Black or Washable Blue-Black. Note: my parents graduated high school in 1940 and 1941, and they had many horror stories of kids ruining clothing with permanent ink. My mother insisted on washable inks, and I liked them because they washed off my hands and out of the sink with no problem. We all learned to protect our three-ring binder and school books from rain storms. Now, I almost instinctively wonder why people demand more-permanent-than-permanent inks, and seem to worry that rain drops are more likely to harm their journals than ink drops are to ruin their clothes.

    - I assume that Jon S wanted to limit his fictional trip to Europe because he had to look up and report on each country he fictionally visited. Certainly would have limited me to as few countries as possible.
    Clearly I should have gone to a school like yours, with the ink well at the top left corner. Alas, I do remember the ink well at the top right. It was just one thing to overcome, and I didn't realize at the time that there might have been an alternative arrangement.
    You are probably right, Pajaro. Since most of us were right handed, it would have been awkward to put the ink jar on the left side. With a left hand holding the paper, it would have been twisty to reach across with across with the right hand.

    By the time we started with "ink pens", about 1957-58, we all used Sheaffer school pens. Sheaffer must have sent free pens, cartridges, and "get started" booklets for us, as some kind person posted here a few years ago. I never saw people use stick pens.

  9. #46
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    Default Re: Is anyone here a "cradle" FP user?

    I've really enjoyed reading these histories. It's funny to see that my 4th-grade start (back in the far-gone year 2008!) aligns with the ages of many here who used them as part of schooling. I was given a "Manuscript" calligraphy set for Christmas or my birthday that year, and quickly took to it. I didn't start note-taking with them until the next year, when I found my grandmother's silver SJ in one of my dad's boxes along with a Parker Vector, and started bringing them to class; I couldn't help myself even in the face of social ostracization (my middle school classmates found it an easy tease). Maybe because of adolescent pressure, I didn't really use them exclusively until a couple years later, when I discovered FPN and dove into the whole world of fountain pen history and design headfirst.
    Will
    If my p.m box is full, feel free to email me at dabantur@gmail.com.

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