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Thread: 50's Omas Dama

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    Senior Member dneal's Avatar
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    Default 50's Omas Dama


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    Senior Member fountainpenkid's Avatar
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    Default Re: 50's Omas Dama

    Last edited by fountainpenkid; May 1st, 2020 at 04:47 PM.
    Will
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    Senior Member dneal's Avatar
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    Default Re: 50's Omas Dama

    Black faceted pens with the Greek key on the cap go back to the lever filler era. The imprint admittedly throws me off. However, the pen doesn’t have the Greek key on the section, and the section and body are one part (later they’re two threaded pieces). The piston knob is still pinned, and there is a cork piston. That clip shows up around the 50’s. The feed is the older 2 channel.

    If you’ve got any information (I have some old catalogs), it would be appreciated. Everything I can find indicates it’s late 50’s era.

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    Senior Member dneal's Avatar
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    Default Re: 50's Omas Dama

    Here are a few I have. An old ringtop lever filler that should be from about the 30's, a later 40's piston filler, the one in question, and a later production (late 80's early 90's-ish).

    Notice the caps below the bands. The older ones have a radius and the most recent is stepped. Same for the barrel. The newer one doesn't taper. It's stepped. Lastly, compare the shape of the sections.

    Omas Capped.jpeg

    Omas Uncapped.jpeg

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    Senior Member fountainpenkid's Avatar
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    Default Re: 50's Omas Dama

    Nice quartet! I have the exact same 1940's vest pocket model...wonderful little pen!

    See here: https://www.tenpen.it/article/milord-paragon
    It's interesting...if not for the radiused transition of the barrel, I would be convinced it was a later '60s or '70s model (the celluloid apparently continued with these pre-Paragon pens, as did the pin-locked piston mechanism). But the radius is interesting. Maybe by the very late '50s they had already gone back to greek key trim--the did eliminate it at the beginning of the decade in favor of the more modern single rings (see Fig. 2 of article). Hopefully an experienced collector finds this and offers some clarity.
    Will
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    Default Re: 50's Omas Dama

    One thing that pushes me towards the barrel and cap of your Dama being post-1950's is the piston trim ring--the rings were thinner on the '50s pens.
    Will
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    Senior Member dneal's Avatar
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    Default Re: 50's Omas Dama

    I'd like to know for sure what it is. I've seen the link you posted, and initially thought the pen was a 60's based off the barrel markings, greek key, etc... The cork piston is what screws with my head. Most European makers switch from cork in the 50's. Omas might be an exception. There just isn't a lot of information, and as the link notes:

    " I finally reached the definitive conclusion that there is an information gap in the history of Omas pens, and that gap needs to be filled."

    and

    "Emilio Dolcini’s book, so far the most complete work on Omas pens, simply does not mention the facetted models".

    I think this pen falls in the gap of missing knowledge. I think the author did a good job trying to fill it, but his work isn't comprehensive.

    --edit--

    One thing I forgot to mention (and can't get a clear picture of) is about the imprint. It's the double line which supposedly indicates celluloid.
    Last edited by dneal; May 2nd, 2020 at 08:00 PM.

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