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Thread: Accountant nib

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    Default Accountant nib

    What exactly is an accountant nib


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    Default Re: Accountant nib

    I wondered about this too a while back and as far as my research went I concluded with a fine nib to extra fine nib and generally in a good quality pen with reliable ink flow. The ones I took a look at were gold nibs and for all pratical purposes, they should be good writers too.

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    Default Re: Accountant nib

    My Sister's Website: Rose Hill Studios
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    Senior Member Jon Szanto's Avatar
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    Default Re: Accountant nib

    To the question in general: an accounting or posting nib traditionally combines a fine or extra-fine tip with a very stiff nib body. The term comes from it being used in accounting, the purpose to write small and legibly in ledger books. The small size of the tip is obvious for the tiny annotations to be made, and the purpose of having a stiff nib is that so it won't flex and widen out the line being put on the paper. A stiff nib can usually be used to write faster with.

    To Jar: being that the PFM nibs weren't stamped (except for the light mark on the backside that rubs off), how would one know when you had an example of an Accountant point?
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    Default Re: Accountant nib

    It's interesting to see they made specific accountant and reporter nibs, maybe it was jobs and educations giving a bit of extra attention at the time. I would guess equivalent nibs could be called EF firm, even EEF firm and Medium Fine Firm? Quite a good selection of tip sizes. From jars picture, it just now dawns on me, that Medium Fine, is not the same as Fine. I have noticed the same with Pelikan nibs, loads of variant have been made at one point, but except from the basic EF, F, M and B, the rest aren't very common.

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    Default Re: Accountant nib

    Made me think of the Esterbrook Bank #14, which is a very fine point, but it does not hold as much ink in reserve as the Falcon of others, but no reason they should.

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    Senior Member carlos.q's Avatar
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    Default Re: Accountant nib

    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck Naill View Post
    Made me think of the Esterbrook Bank #14, which is a very fine point, but it does not hold as much ink in reserve as the Falcon of others, but no reason they should.
    Also made me think of the Esterbrook 9450 "Extra Firm Posting" nibs and the vintage Pelikan DEF manifold extra fine nibs.

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    Senior Member FredRydr's Avatar
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    Default Re: Accountant nib

    Then there're the Pelikan Durchschreib nibs.

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    Default Re: Accountant nib

    Quote Originally Posted by FredRydr View Post
    Then there're the Pelikan Durchschreib nibs.
    I had to look it up. Durchschrieben translates to copying. Carbon copies? So, manifold nibs?

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    Default Re: Accountant nib

    Quote Originally Posted by carlos.q View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck Naill View Post
    Made me think of the Esterbrook Bank #14, which is a very fine point, but it does not hold as much ink in reserve as the Falcon of others, but no reason they should.
    Also made me think of the Esterbrook 9450 "Extra Firm Posting" nibs and the vintage Pelikan DEF manifold extra fine nibs.
    I think I have one somewhere. LOL!!

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    Senior Member jar's Avatar
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    Default Re: Accountant nib

    Quote Originally Posted by Jon Szanto View Post
    To the question in general: an accounting or posting nib traditionally combines a fine or extra-fine tip with a very stiff nib body. The term comes from it being used in accounting, the purpose to write small and legibly in ledger books. The small size of the tip is obvious for the tiny annotations to be made, and the purpose of having a stiff nib is that so it won't flex and widen out the line being put on the paper. A stiff nib can usually be used to write faster with.

    To Jar: being that the PFM nibs weren't stamped (except for the light mark on the backside that rubs off), how would one know when you had an example of an Accountant point?

    You write with it and make an WAG. But really, the accountant nibs were all just extra extra fine and designed to also work through carbon copies, so fine, stiff, rounded tips.
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