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Thread: The MacLean Method of Writing

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    Senior Member Ole Juul's Avatar
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    Default Re: The MacLean Method of Writing

    Quote Originally Posted by Yazeh View Post
    Ole, what was the pen you used by the way? Fountain pens or dip pens?
    Not mine. My only claim is that I edited and clarified the picture so I could show the "t". lol Check out the blog.

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    Default Re: The MacLean Method of Writing

    For some reason I learned a modified version of Spencerian in school. The capital letters, the slanted ovals, the main and connective strokes, are spot on; b, f, h, k took all of the space between the lines on the page, (3/3); d, t and p were 2/3 tall; a, c 1/3 tall. The only difference to the original Spencerian was the "r", and we were given a second alternative for the basic Spencerian "t". We were also given the option to either write the decorative Spencerian capitals, or something more close the basic print letter. We have the letters æ,ø,å, and there was a standard for them too. I know a more simplifed "school" cursive was tougth too.

    Here is a simple version of what we were tought here in Norway, I don't think pupils are tought cursive anymore. It shows the alternative shape for "r" and "t". I guess this is the writing of a child who has practiced a bit.


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    Default Re: The MacLean Method of Writing

    Quote Originally Posted by Ole Juul View Post

    I'm referring to that image, which I found on on some random blog while searching. Sorry if my phrasing was confusing.
    ...

    I don't think Mr. MacLean was very original. Especially now that I see the Palmer method looks almost identical and was much earlier. I think he basically copied all of it. Of course there's nothing wrong with that, especially since it was already some sort of standard, and the object was to introduce a standard to Canadian schools and get some kind of commonality to the way students were writing.
    Your phrasing isn't confusing. My problem is that there's no image on my computer. Can you provide a link to the blog?

    Another topic: it seems to me that different regions each develop their own style of cursive writing for the purpose of teaching children how to write. They don't acknowledge other styles, even if they build on it. MacLean doesn't seem to acknowledge Spencer or Palmer. Then there's Copperplate, Zaner-Bloser, S'Nealian, and Getty-Dubay. Iceland developed its own style which looks the same as American cursive, but they don't acknowledge that. (Except Grondal, Handwriting Models does.) I found a helpful book in the bookstore.The Lost Art of Handwriting by Brenna Jordan, which makes no reference to Spencer or Palmer. Rather, it looks like school districts would rather reinvent the wheel of teaching handwriting.
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    Senior Member Ole Juul's Avatar
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    Default Re: The MacLean Method of Writing

    Quote Originally Posted by kaliuzhkin View Post

    Your phrasing isn't confusing. My problem is that there's no image on my computer. Can you provide a link to the blog?
    Of course. Here is the link to the "rite while u can" blog. And here is a direct link to my image taken from there: http://cgs.pw/stuff/Final-t-MacLean.jpg

    Another topic: it seems to me that different regions each develop their own style of cursive writing for the purpose of teaching children how to write. They don't acknowledge other styles, even if they build on it. MacLean doesn't seem to acknowledge Spencer or Palmer. Then there's Copperplate, Zaner-Bloser, S'Nealian, and Getty-Dubay. Iceland developed its own style which looks the same as American cursive, but they don't acknowledge that. (Except Grondal, Handwriting Models does.) I found a helpful book in the bookstore.The Lost Art of Handwriting by Brenna Jordan, which makes no reference to Spencer or Palmer.
    Indeed. There is no acknowledgement of the larger view. That seems counter to the ideals of education to me.

    Rather, it looks like school districts would rather reinvent the wheel of teaching handwriting.
    There is prestige and personal pride in education and it can get in the way. Also, at least in more modern times, there is a good reason for someone to make their own system and book - there is a lot of money in selling educational material to school boards.

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    Default Re: The MacLean Method of Writing

    Quote Originally Posted by Ole Juul View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Yazeh View Post
    Ole, what was the pen you used by the way? Fountain pens or dip pens?
    Not mine. My only claim is that I edited and clarified the picture so I could show the "t". lol Check out the blog.
    Sorry, I meant what type of pen you used I school, when you did the MacLean method?
    I know in France they used dip pens till 65, so I guess yours was such?

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    Senior Member Ole Juul's Avatar
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    Default Re: The MacLean Method of Writing

    Quote Originally Posted by Yazeh View Post
    Sorry, I meant what type of pen you used I school, when you did the MacLean method?
    I know in France they used dip pens till 65, so I guess yours was such?
    I went to school in Canada from 1957 and at that time it was all ballpoint. The first school I went to was an old one and I did see holes in the desks, some of which still had ink wells. However it looked like it had been a year or two since they were used. The ballpoints however were shaped like dip pens. They were provided, as were pencils and notebooks. Just a few years later, nothing was provided except books of course. This was the Vancouver School Board, which would mostly set policy for the rest of the province. I have no idea what was done in other provinces of Canada.

    By the way, I made a mistake in the original post, it was in grade five (not four) that Mr. MacLean came. Although I guess writing was taught from grade four. Earlier grades were print only. We didn't use the word cursive here. We just said "writing", as opposed to "printing".

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    Senior Member Yazeh's Avatar
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    Default Re: The MacLean Method of Writing

    Thanks Ole, makes sense. My memory of my schooling daysare rather sketchy, but I believe we had to use fountain pens. I believe I had a Geha, which I bent the nib...
    I remember vaguely using dip pens for mandatory calligraphy course but that was short lived...
    Practicng with dip pen has mediative effect...
    Ted Bishop, in ink also speaks of that extensively, in Chinese calligraphy.....
    I believe the instrument here as important and as method

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    Default Re: The MacLean Method of Writing

    Quote Originally Posted by Ole Juul View Post
    Another topic: it seems to me that different regions each develop their own style of cursive writing for the purpose of teaching children how to write. They don't acknowledge other styles, even if they build on it. MacLean doesn't seem to acknowledge Spencer or Palmer. Then there's Copperplate, Zaner-Bloser, S'Nealian, and Getty-Dubay. Iceland developed its own style which looks the same as American cursive, but they don't acknowledge that. (Except Grondal, Handwriting Models does.) I found a helpful book in the bookstore.The Lost Art of Handwriting by Brenna Jordan, which makes no reference to Spencer or Palmer.
    Indeed. There is no acknowledgement of the larger view. That seems counter to the ideals of education to me.

    Rather, it looks like school districts would rather reinvent the wheel of teaching handwriting.
    There is prestige and personal pride in education and it can get in the way. Also, at least in more modern times, there is a good reason for someone to make their own system and book - there is a lot of money in selling educational material to school boards.
    I strongly suspect this is for a few reasons:
    1) copyright. Completely agreeing with the above statement. Palmer didn't exactly give away the books... but if you were "deeply influenced" by his style and came up with your own method, well, you could price it slightly cheaper... and make a mint
    2) Canadian obsession with "canadianizing" things. (note this seems to only apply to Governments who spend someone else's money in an attempt to boost their approval rate)
    See: Ross Rifle; or
    See: "A Soldier First" By Gen.(Ret) Rick Hiller's story about the gun sights on the "new" Leopard tanks back in the 80s...; and
    See: LSVW... "what a piece of junk" -Luke Skywalker upon first sight of an LSVW (probably)

    Quote Originally Posted by Ole Juul View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Yazeh View Post
    Sorry, I meant what type of pen you used I school, when you did the MacLean method?
    I know in France they used dip pens till 65, so I guess yours was such?
    I went to school in Canada from 1957 and at that time it was all ballpoint. The first school I went to was an old one and I did see holes in the desks, some of which still had ink wells. However it looked like it had been a year or two since they were used. The ballpoints however were shaped like dip pens. They were provided, as were pencils and notebooks. Just a few years later, nothing was provided except books of course. This was the Vancouver School Board, which would mostly set policy for the rest of the province. I have no idea what was done in other provinces of Canada.

    By the way, I made a mistake in the original post, it was in grade five (not four) that Mr. MacLean came. Although I guess writing was taught from grade four. Earlier grades were print only. We didn't use the word cursive here. We just said "writing", as opposed to "printing".
    My parents both went to school in the 50s and graduated HS in the late 60s. At least where they lived, fountain pens were still the style in use until HS, and some teachers in HS I have been told would reject Ballpoint written work.

    I went to school in the 80s and 90s. In Ontario, like my parents. And I had desks that still had the hole in the upper right hand corner for an ink well...

    Quote Originally Posted by mizgeorge View Post
    I think Molly mainly writes with
    yup, but hey, it did help me find this fascinating thread! (you reported it right?...)

    FWIW I was taught printing and then D'nealean(I think...) (starting in grade 2 I think..) and hated it (I know!) and regressed to a cramp inducing print.
    Two yrs ago I decided to try cursive again.
    https://www.instagram.com/acousticpens/?hl=en
    These magnificent examples of Palmer/Zaner/Business Penmanship inspired me. This is what I WANT my handwriting to look like.
    It just.... flows... its so... light, floaty and elegant. Yeah, I know, I'm getting all misty over handwriting...
    Anyway, apparently, based on the comments I've read above... I'm the only one who actually LIKES what Business Penmanship looks like... :/

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    Default Re: The MacLean Method of Writing

    I believe Copperplate/Roundhand/Engrosser’s Script etc. were the business hands of their time. You can see how they’re vaguely related to Renaissance humanist styles. Palmer/MacLean are just one or two more steps down the road.

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    Default Re: The MacLean Method of Writing

    I really love this method of writing, especially when I send some letters, it gives me an antique vibe. However, even even though I have calligraphic writing I am very bad at grammar and I usually make mistakes that I don't even notice. This is why, when I have to write an essay after I finish it I use an online editor essay in order to see where I did wrong. And with time, I have understood where I make the most mistakes so I worked on them more, but I still have to use an editor as I am not sure in my knowledge.
    Last edited by Robert_322; September 30th, 2021 at 08:47 AM.

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    Default Re: The MacLean Method of Writing

    Robert... Follow The Force...Follow The Force...

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    Default Re: The MacLean Method of Writing

    This is a beautiful method of writing. But just as a well discipline Master penman you should Undergo all the writing lessons.
    I think this method comes from the " Ladies hand penmanship" which was introduced by an associate of the Spencerian school of penmanship. (I can't get his name now ) So this writing style was introduced to write faster than SPENCERIAN TO write without Flourishes and uniquely to write on monoclines to gain more time.
    I find there are a few different Masters of penman who had used this similar method.

    J.J BAILY 1879-1970
    Palmer’s method- 1888-1898 His Method was first published by between the years.
    Melon Olive _ Ladies hand 1924-1925 She is seen teaching her class of this method.

    Whoever created this method,it was a revolutionary mutation of writing that time as Time was money at that time to write with a well disciplined master penman.
    Last edited by Cyril; January 4th, 2022 at 12:54 PM.

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    Default Re: The MacLean Method of Writing

    Discovering the MacLean Method of Writing has been useful for me. Its structured approach and clarity significantly improved my writing skills. Additionally, relying on writing services is crucial, nursing writing services reviews are my compass, guiding me to services that deliver quality and reliability. It ensures my work maintains a professional edge, making the writing process easier and more effective.
    Last edited by Mık Joger; December 21st, 2023 at 06:36 AM.

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    Default Re: The MacLean Method of Writing

    Mik Jogger. the long term spammer now seems to be pretending to sound normal as though we might not notice.
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    Default Re: The MacLean Method of Writing

    Quote Originally Posted by Chrissy View Post
    Mik Jogger. the long term spammer now seems to be pretending to sound normal as though we might not notice.
    Did you know that "Mik Joger" is an anagram of "grim joke"?

    Sent from my SM-G991U using Tapatalk
    M: I came here for a good argument.
    A: No you didn't; no, you came here for an argument.
    M: An argument isn't just contradiction.
    A: It can be.
    M: No it can't. An argument is a connected series of statements intended to establish a proposition.
    A: No it isn't.
    M: Yes it is! It's not just contradiction.
    A: Look, if I argue with you, I must take up a contrary position.
    M: Yes, but that's not just saying 'No it isn't.'
    A: Yes it is!
    M: No it isn't!

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    Default Re: The MacLean Method of Writing

    A good anagram but the letter that looks like an "i" is not that character. It's a special character instead.
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    Default Re: The MacLean Method of Writing

    Quote Originally Posted by Chrissy View Post
    A good anagram but the letter that looks like an "i" is not that character. It's a special character instead.
    From chatGPT:
    The symbol "ı" is a lowercase dotless "i" and is used in Turkish and Azerbaijani, among other languages.

    Sent from my SM-G991U using Tapatalk
    M: I came here for a good argument.
    A: No you didn't; no, you came here for an argument.
    M: An argument isn't just contradiction.
    A: It can be.
    M: No it can't. An argument is a connected series of statements intended to establish a proposition.
    A: No it isn't.
    M: Yes it is! It's not just contradiction.
    A: Look, if I argue with you, I must take up a contrary position.
    M: Yes, but that's not just saying 'No it isn't.'
    A: Yes it is!
    M: No it isn't!

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    Default Re: The MacLean Method of Writing

    Mik jogger should consider moving to canada and then immediately investigating and taking advantage of its robust MAiD program as a service to the world.

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    Default Re: The MacLean Method of Writing

    I'm not sure what method I was taught. In second grade, I was taught a method that might have been MacLean. In third grade, I was transferred to a new school that opened closer to my home. There, a new method that might have been Zaner-Bloser was taught. Only one other third grade student, an English boy who had moved to America and just down the street from me in time to be in my second grade class, had previously been taught cursive writing.

    The (possibly) Zaner-Bloser script appealed more to me than the method taught to me the year before, so I didn't mind unlearning the old method. But I'm not certain that it was really Zaner-Bloser. The examples I have seen in adulthood of Zaner-Bloser aren't exactly what i was taught, they're just the closer than any other method I can identify.

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