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Thread: The MacLean Method of Writing

  1. #21
    Senior Member Ole Juul's Avatar
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    Default Re: The MacLean Method of Writing

    Quote Originally Posted by Yazeh View Post
    Ole, what was the pen you used by the way? Fountain pens or dip pens?
    Not mine. My only claim is that I edited and clarified the picture so I could show the "t". lol Check out the blog.

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    Default Re: The MacLean Method of Writing

    For some reason I learned a modified version of Spencerian in school. The capital letters, the slanted ovals, the main and connective strokes, are spot on; b, f, h, k took all of the space between the lines on the page, (3/3); d, t and p were 2/3 tall; a, c 1/3 tall. The only difference to the original Spencerian was the "r", and we were given a second alternative for the basic Spencerian "t". We were also given the option to either write the decorative Spencerian capitals, or something more close the basic print letter. We have the letters æ,ø,å, and there was a standard for them too. I know a more simplifed "school" cursive was tougth too.

    Here is a simple version of what we were tought here in Norway, I don't think pupils are tought cursive anymore. It shows the alternative shape for "r" and "t". I guess this is the writing of a child who has practiced a bit.


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    Default Re: The MacLean Method of Writing

    Quote Originally Posted by Ole Juul View Post

    I'm referring to that image, which I found on on some random blog while searching. Sorry if my phrasing was confusing.
    ...

    I don't think Mr. MacLean was very original. Especially now that I see the Palmer method looks almost identical and was much earlier. I think he basically copied all of it. Of course there's nothing wrong with that, especially since it was already some sort of standard, and the object was to introduce a standard to Canadian schools and get some kind of commonality to the way students were writing.
    Your phrasing isn't confusing. My problem is that there's no image on my computer. Can you provide a link to the blog?

    Another topic: it seems to me that different regions each develop their own style of cursive writing for the purpose of teaching children how to write. They don't acknowledge other styles, even if they build on it. MacLean doesn't seem to acknowledge Spencer or Palmer. Then there's Copperplate, Zaner-Bloser, S'Nealian, and Getty-Dubay. Iceland developed its own style which looks the same as American cursive, but they don't acknowledge that. (Except Grondal, Handwriting Models does.) I found a helpful book in the bookstore.The Lost Art of Handwriting by Brenna Jordan, which makes no reference to Spencer or Palmer. Rather, it looks like school districts would rather reinvent the wheel of teaching handwriting.
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  5. #24
    Senior Member Ole Juul's Avatar
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    Default Re: The MacLean Method of Writing

    Quote Originally Posted by kaliuzhkin View Post

    Your phrasing isn't confusing. My problem is that there's no image on my computer. Can you provide a link to the blog?
    Of course. Here is the link to the "rite while u can" blog. And here is a direct link to my image taken from there: http://cgs.pw/stuff/Final-t-MacLean.jpg

    Another topic: it seems to me that different regions each develop their own style of cursive writing for the purpose of teaching children how to write. They don't acknowledge other styles, even if they build on it. MacLean doesn't seem to acknowledge Spencer or Palmer. Then there's Copperplate, Zaner-Bloser, S'Nealian, and Getty-Dubay. Iceland developed its own style which looks the same as American cursive, but they don't acknowledge that. (Except Grondal, Handwriting Models does.) I found a helpful book in the bookstore.The Lost Art of Handwriting by Brenna Jordan, which makes no reference to Spencer or Palmer.
    Indeed. There is no acknowledgement of the larger view. That seems counter to the ideals of education to me.

    Rather, it looks like school districts would rather reinvent the wheel of teaching handwriting.
    There is prestige and personal pride in education and it can get in the way. Also, at least in more modern times, there is a good reason for someone to make their own system and book - there is a lot of money in selling educational material to school boards.

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    Senior Member Yazeh's Avatar
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    Default Re: The MacLean Method of Writing

    Quote Originally Posted by Ole Juul View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Yazeh View Post
    Ole, what was the pen you used by the way? Fountain pens or dip pens?
    Not mine. My only claim is that I edited and clarified the picture so I could show the "t". lol Check out the blog.
    Sorry, I meant what type of pen you used I school, when you did the MacLean method?
    I know in France they used dip pens till 65, so I guess yours was such?

  8. #26
    Senior Member Ole Juul's Avatar
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    Default Re: The MacLean Method of Writing

    Quote Originally Posted by Yazeh View Post
    Sorry, I meant what type of pen you used I school, when you did the MacLean method?
    I know in France they used dip pens till 65, so I guess yours was such?
    I went to school in Canada from 1957 and at that time it was all ballpoint. The first school I went to was an old one and I did see holes in the desks, some of which still had ink wells. However it looked like it had been a year or two since they were used. The ballpoints however were shaped like dip pens. They were provided, as were pencils and notebooks. Just a few years later, nothing was provided except books of course. This was the Vancouver School Board, which would mostly set policy for the rest of the province. I have no idea what was done in other provinces of Canada.

    By the way, I made a mistake in the original post, it was in grade five (not four) that Mr. MacLean came. Although I guess writing was taught from grade four. Earlier grades were print only. We didn't use the word cursive here. We just said "writing", as opposed to "printing".

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  10. #27
    Senior Member Yazeh's Avatar
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    Default Re: The MacLean Method of Writing

    Thanks Ole, makes sense. My memory of my schooling daysare rather sketchy, but I believe we had to use fountain pens. I believe I had a Geha, which I bent the nib...
    I remember vaguely using dip pens for mandatory calligraphy course but that was short lived...
    Practicng with dip pen has mediative effect...
    Ted Bishop, in ink also speaks of that extensively, in Chinese calligraphy.....
    I believe the instrument here as important and as method

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