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Thread: For flex enthusiasts

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    Default For flex enthusiasts

    Saw this video on the 'Tube and thought it would be of interest to some of the members here.



    At first I thought it was another Zebra G nib frankenpen, but the nib looks different (apart from the colour, it doesn't have the cut outs that the G has).

    Anyone come across this before, or knows anything more about this?

    If this is not a replaceable nib (and I have serious doubts about this), then this could be a game changer for those looking at proper flexible nibs for fountain pens without having to go all vintage and gold and stuff.

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    Default Re: For flex enthusiasts

    Found another video, different maker but looks like same nib.



    I notice from their website that they claim the nib will last years, but as they sell replacement nibs I am suspicious of this claim.

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    Default Re: For flex enthusiasts

    Aaron ships from California: https://aaronpen.com

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    Default Re: For flex enthusiasts

    Here is another one:
    The design reminds me of Feriris Wheel Press The nib looks like the Kanwrite Ultraflex: https://thegoodblue.co.uk

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    Default Re: For flex enthusiasts

    Quote Originally Posted by Empty_of_Clouds View Post
    Found another video, different maker but looks like same nib.

    ]
    I notice from their website that they claim the nib will last years, but as they sell replacement nibs I am suspicious of this claim.
    Yeah. I read that too:
    https://www.bluedewpens.com/faqs

    Oh and sbrebrown does a review of it:

    Last edited by Yazeh; September 9th, 2021 at 09:12 AM.

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    Default Re: For flex enthusiasts

    I wonder if Detman101 will be trying this out, or if he's currently satisfied with his Secretary of de Flex nib.

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    Default Re: For flex enthusiasts

    I'm pretty sure Detman101 got a couple of Blue Dew nibs already.

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    Default Re: For flex enthusiasts

    Those horizontal lines on the tines serve what purpose? Decreasing rigidity?
    Will
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    Default Re: For flex enthusiasts

    Not sure, but they are occasionally found on some brands of vintage dip nibs. Maybe something to do with holding ink rather than flex, but that's a guess.


    Edit: one thing that is highlighted in these (and other flex nib) videos is just how few people know to write using a flexible pen. Most right-handed writers drag their nib across the page, when the correct way is to push the nib. If you watch the calligrapher in the first video you can see how she orients the pen with the strokes being made. Compare that with Brown and Mick (the Bluedew vid). Left-handed underwriters should have fewer problems as the angle is more natural for them!

    The reason for bringing this up is that there are comments on these videos about the scratchiness of these nibs. Well, that scratchiness is significantly reduced when the nib is applied to the paper at the proper writing angle.
    Last edited by Empty_of_Clouds; September 9th, 2021 at 03:18 PM.

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    Default Re: For flex enthusiasts

    This is the main reason that I don't want to get into flex nibs. They look like fun, but I know I'm not going to put in the practice necessary to actually use them correctly. I'll take the shortcut to line variation with a cursive italic nib and be fine with it.

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    Default Re: For flex enthusiasts

    This is a quote from the Bluedew website regarding their nibs.

    Is the flex nib just another G nib conversion?
    No, definitely not. The nib is designed from ground up, taking inspiration and design elements from the usual #6 nib and dip nibs.

    What is the flex nib made of?
    The nib is made from stainless steel with spring steel flexibility that do not rust, even with iron gall inks This is in contrast to affordable spring steel dip nibs. Beyond corrosion resistance, the selection criteria included choosing a stainless steel with good spring steel characteristics. It ended up costing more (compared to normal stainless steel nibs) but provided enormous benefit for the added cost.

    Why is there no nib tipping material on the flex nib?
    Fine lines are more important than fat swells for flex, as they impart beauty and elegance to the writing. A decision was made to omit nib tipping material to achieve a finer line. That said, unless you write on highly abrasive paper, the nib will not wear down as flex writing requires a light hand and slow strokes.

    Why is the feed plastic and not ebonite?
    A good feed needs to perform 2 functions; firstly to supply ink to the nib, and; secondly, to modulate the flow of ink. Ebonite feeds generally are good at ink supply, but are not good in ink modulation. E.g. burping of ink with eyedropper-conversion.

    To meet the ink flow requirement for flex writing, I have designed 2 things. Firstly, the B embossed on the nib will pool a small amount of ink on the underside of the nib right behind the breather hole, and can work as a buffer reservoir for flexing swells. Secondly, the nib wraps around the feed closely as opposed to flared nib shoulders, keeping ink among the fins to provide additional ink when required.
    Thoughts on this? I am considering get a couple of the replacement nib units to check them out - perhaps a long term corrosion test alongside a comparison with other dip nibs (I have quite a few!).

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    Default Re: For flex enthusiasts

    Ebonite feeds generally are good at ink supply, but are not good in ink modulation. E.g. burping of ink with eyedropper-conversion.
    I don't think it is accurate to blame the ebonite feeds for burping...
    Vintage. Cursive italic. Iron gall.

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    Default Re: For flex enthusiasts

    I agree. Burping occurs with plastic feeds too, and as I understood was a function of temperature change and air in the ink chamber.

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    Default Re: For flex enthusiasts

    Bit surprised this hasn't generated more discussion, given how often there is gushing over flexible nibs. Detman seems to be our resident enthusiast, so I would be interesting in hearing his/her thoughts on this.

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    Default Re: For flex enthusiasts

    Im not Detman, but ive been working on my roundhand. I just use vintage flex and an MB 149 Calligraphy. Im fairly content with what i have & being willing to splurge on pens, im not the target demographic for this pen.

    My feelings on this one are that the lack of tipping and plastic feed are a disappointing, but not deal killers. A well-designed plastic feed can work even for a flex nib pen. The question is how well-designed is it. Im sure Pilot would say the same thing about plastic feeds, plus add that were Pilot, we didnt become the 800lb gorilla of the Japanese pen market by making crappy products.. And yet their plastic feeds dont keep up with their FA nibs when used for Spencerian hands etc. A generic, off the shelf plastic feed probably would be even worse than the Pilot feed.

    As for the tipping, the lack of tipping sort of reminds me of the Esterbrook 2128. You do have to use some regular but rhythmic pressure for calligraphy and ive seen 2128s worn down to medium stubs. The 9128s are preferable in my book, but then they cost more too. For someone more price sensitive, an untipped nib is a reasonable compromise.

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    Default Re: For flex enthusiasts

    Quote Originally Posted by Empty_of_Clouds View Post
    If this is not a replaceable nib (and I have serious doubts about this), then this could be a game changer for those looking at proper flexible nibs for fountain pens without having to go all vintage and gold and stuff.
    But David, I am sucker for vintage, gold, and flexible nibs
    - Will
    Unique and restored vintage pens: Redeem Pens

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    Default Re: For flex enthusiasts

    Detman101 did have something to say over at FPN in regards to modern flex nibs. This is a quote from his posting in the 'Of Nibs & Tines' forum:


    "After buying 50 FPR ultraflex nibs, modding nibs for flex, buying a vintage flex pen and trying many others...I've come to the following conclusion.

    (My personal opinion)

    A+ #1 Bar-None/Best-of-the-absolute-best - MB 149 W/Calligraphy nib (Buy once, cry a few times over 20+ years...but you won't need or desire another flex pen after it)

    Very next best - FP Nibs (FPNibs.com) 14k Soft-Flex nib (delicious smooth flex, but gold flex nib is a gusher)

    Third best - "Secretary of De Flex" Flex-stub (Not the finest line, but smooth as butter and flexes like vintage. I own and love their XXF flex nib)

    All else - Expensive Vintage flex nibs, etc...

    Good luck on your path..."

    He may hopefully pop in later and comment in regards to the Blue Dew nibs.

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    Default Re: For flex enthusiasts

    Quote Originally Posted by Empty_of_Clouds View Post
    Saw this video on the 'Tube and thought it would be of interest to some of the members here.



    At first I thought it was another Zebra G nib frankenpen, but the nib looks different (apart from the colour, it doesn't have the cut outs that the G has).

    Anyone come across this before, or knows anything more about this?

    If this is not a replaceable nib (and I have serious doubts about this), then this could be a game changer for those looking at proper flexible nibs for fountain pens without having to go all vintage and gold and stuff.
    Wow...and now "Blue-Dew" pens has been ripped off.
    These "Aaron Pens" didn't even bother to change the embossed "B" (for "Blue-Dew") on the nib...unbelievable.
    "I can only improve my self, not the world."

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    Default Re: For flex enthusiasts

    Quote Originally Posted by junglejim View Post
    I wonder if Detman101 will be trying this out, or if he's currently satisfied with his Secretary of de Flex nib.
    Hey all, I am owner of two Blue-Dew flex nibs.
    They are out of this world performing flex nibs with Zebra-G performance...without all the rust.
    The reason that my Blue-Dew flex nibs are not my daily drivers is that they are almost needlepoint thinness and I need something that I can write with fast.
    If you write FAST with the Blue-Dew flex nib...you WILL snag the paper! So...that is why, for me, the Secretary-of-De-Flex nib unit is the best middle ground.
    It does XXF-BBB flexing and is smooth enough that it doesn't get snagged up in the paper when you're writing fast notes or using sub-par paper.

    But on topic...I'm shocked and amazed that these "aaron pens" bums have straight out taken the "Blue-Dew" nibs and stuck them into a crappy pen body and resold the whole unit as if it's something new!!!
    "I can only improve my self, not the world."

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    Default Re: For flex enthusiasts

    Quote Originally Posted by Empty_of_Clouds View Post
    This is a quote from the Bluedew website regarding their nibs.

    1. Is the flex nib just another G nib conversion?
    No, definitely not. The nib is designed from ground up, taking inspiration and design elements from the usual #6 nib and dip nibs.

    2. What is the flex nib made of?
    The nib is made from stainless steel with spring steel flexibility that do not rust, even with iron gall inks This is in contrast to affordable spring steel dip nibs. Beyond corrosion resistance, the selection criteria included choosing a stainless steel with good spring steel characteristics. It ended up costing more (compared to normal stainless steel nibs) but provided enormous benefit for the added cost.

    3. Why is there no nib tipping material on the flex nib?
    Fine lines are more important than fat swells for flex, as they impart beauty and elegance to the writing. A decision was made to omit nib tipping material to achieve a finer line. That said, unless you write on highly abrasive paper, the nib will not wear down as flex writing requires a light hand and slow strokes.

    4. Why is the feed plastic and not ebonite?
    A good feed needs to perform 2 functions; firstly to supply ink to the nib, and; secondly, to modulate the flow of ink. Ebonite feeds generally are good at ink supply, but are not good in ink modulation. E.g. burping of ink with eyedropper-conversion.

    To meet the ink flow requirement for flex writing, I have designed 2 things. Firstly, the B embossed on the nib will pool a small amount of ink on the underside of the nib right behind the breather hole, and can work as a buffer reservoir for flexing swells. Secondly, the nib wraps around the feed closely as opposed to flared nib shoulders, keeping ink among the fins to provide additional ink when required.
    Thoughts on this? I am considering get a couple of the replacement nib units to check them out - perhaps a long term corrosion test alongside a comparison with other dip nibs (I have quite a few!).
    1. Definitely a use of older dip-pen design notes...hence the horizontal lines across the tines (which increase flex-ability when using steel). It does perform like a Zebra-G nib...without needing to dip it though...hehe.
    2. Yep, steel...and it doesnt get blown-out easily either.
    3. Yep...no tipping..just like a dip nib. And just like a dip-nib, this BD nib starts out with hair-thin size lines and flexes to BBB width. I wish I had bought these before I spent +$300 getting that F-C flex nib modded by Gena Salorino.
    4. The feed is plastic because the ink-conducting properties of the BD nib make it quite a gusher. The plastic feed serves to regulate the ink flow so that you can use it without dumping ink all over the page.

    Now...I use my BD nib with an ebonite nib, but it's the same ebonite nib that was chemically altered and does not conduct ink like it once did. That ebonite feed works more like a plastic feed and is perfect for my BD nib...situated in a Penbbs-487 with "Sailor - Manyo Nadeshiko" ink to get beautiful shading. It's taken about 4-5 months to find the right combination of feed, pen and ink to get the absolute best out of my Blue-Dew flex nibs.
    Last edited by Detman101; September 11th, 2021 at 04:10 PM.
    "I can only improve my self, not the world."

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