Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst ... 2345 LastLast
Results 61 to 80 of 98

Thread: Vintage Pens today - An Observation

  1. #61
    Senior Member silverlifter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Posts
    616
    Thanks
    359
    Thanked 760 Times in 354 Posts
    Rep Power
    4

    Default Re: Vintage Pens today - An Observation

    Quote Originally Posted by Chip View Post
    What would you do?
    I would try and rehome the ones that meant the most to me: sell, or gift them to a younger generation of vintage afficionados. The rest I would sell/donate.
    Vintage. Cursive italic. Iron gall.

  2. #62
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    Clinging desperately to planet Earth
    Posts
    371
    Thanks
    31
    Thanked 355 Times in 210 Posts
    Rep Power
    6

    Default Re: Vintage Pens today - An Observation

    Quote Originally Posted by Chip View Post
    Back to pens. I'm happy with my present collection, which includes iconic pens by Conklin, Sheaffer, Parker, Pelikan, Waterman, Conway Stewart, Moore, and other makers.

    I usually have two or three pens inked at any given time. For Christmas, I fill a green Sheaffer (Jade Flat-top, Jade Balance, or dark green Touchdown) with green ink and a Duofold Big Red or Pelikan M101N with red ink to do the cards.

    Not having kids, I'm thinking about the fate of my pens. Should I sell them and donate the proceeds to a charity? Leave the collection to an institutution or some as yet unidentified pen aficionado?

    What would you do?
    Are there people who are special to you? Friends, past business associates, not to distant relatives -- nephews or nieces, people who have been there during difficult times, or that you have helped in the past? Have you considered willing some of your pens to them as a remembrance? That is an option to consider.

    I did this with some of my late wife's 'special things' after she passed away. I know how much it meant to those she loved and who loved her to have something of hers as a keepsake.
    Last edited by An old bloke; September 27th, 2021 at 12:18 AM.

  3. #63
    Senior Member FredRydr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Carlisle, Pennsylvania USA
    Posts
    4,058
    Thanks
    1,048
    Thanked 4,758 Times in 2,021 Posts
    Rep Power
    15

    Default Re: Vintage Pens today - An Observation

    Quote Originally Posted by Chip View Post
    ...Not having kids, I'm thinking about the fate of my pens. Should I sell them and donate the proceeds to a charity? Leave the collection to an institutution or some as yet unidentified pen aficionado?

    What would you do?
    I deal with this issue all the time. Decades of experience has proven that collectors usually put a higher value on their possessions than current market would bear, with the result being that they hold on to their tangible personal property to the very end. Beneficiaries of their estates most often do not have the same emotional investment and, with few exceptions, opt to expeditiously liquidate for cash. If that breaks your heart, at least now you know what usually happens.

    Therefore, today, decide what is important to you. Ask intended beneficiaries if they have an interest in all or any of the items that make up the collection (as distinguished from an interest in exploiting their perceived value of the collection). Then consult legal counsel to prepare your Will. You may be advised to deliver gifts during your lifetime to beneficiaries who expressed a desire to keep certain items, or to a charitable beneficiary that will accept receipt of tangible personal property.

    Disposition of the balance of the collection depends upon how much effort and time you are willing to devote. You can begin to liquidate the remainder of your collection during your lifetime for market retail prices, or you might feel your time is too valuable to worry about it and be perfectly content to leave it up to others (or your executor) to liquidate your unwanted collection at whatever method they choose (e.g., public auction at wholesale value).

    As for me, my heirs have no interest in fountain pens (except for a few modern Pelikans!?), so four years ago I began to gradually sell off my pen collection. I've paused now that I am down to favorites. I feel no regret, and I did buy a unique modern pen two weeks ago!

  4. #64
    Senior Member penwash's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    Dallas, as in the 80's TV Series
    Posts
    3,339
    Thanks
    2,639
    Thanked 5,089 Times in 1,697 Posts
    Rep Power
    11

    Default Re: Vintage Pens today - An Observation

    Quote Originally Posted by Chip View Post
    Not having kids, I'm thinking about the fate of my pens. Should I sell them and donate the proceeds to a charity? Leave the collection to an institutution or some as yet unidentified pen aficionado?

    What would you do?
    I found out early in this hobby that I like vintage pens, and I love to restore them.
    What follows is the realization that if I want to continue restoring, I have to find new homes for some of the pens that I restored, otherwise I will go broke in no time.

    So I started making my restored pens available and back them up with satisfaction guarantee.
    This way, my collection will not grow into the size that would be a hassle to keep or get rid of (at least that's the plan, hahaha).

    A funny side note: At the beginning, I thought I would keep some of the most pristine, popular and desirable pens in my collection. Years later, what I found out is that my collection gravitates towards pens that I spend the most time restoring, or the ones that I love just because, warts and all
    - Will
    Unique and restored vintage pens: Redeem Pens

  5. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to penwash For This Useful Post:

    Sailor Kenshin (September 28th, 2021), TFarnon (October 3rd, 2021)

  6. #65
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    365
    Thanks
    96
    Thanked 185 Times in 114 Posts
    Rep Power
    8

    Default Re: Vintage Pens today - An Observation

    I have wandered back around to Fountain pens and clearly, there is far, far less posting on the forums. Various types of platforms seem to come and go, and I suspect that those who figure many younger enthusiasts are using Instagram and reddit and who knows what the next things after those - I certainly don't keep track. So that is part of it, I agree. I somehow - no, I have no idea how - ended up in a Youtube video I then had to jump out of so someone else could use the computer, so I can't link it, but it was by a young woman who had just bought her first vintage pen from Peyton Street pens and from what she was saying it seemed like she had been hesitent before because they seemed something to be dealt with.


    I would put good solid cash on any pen coming from Peyton Street pens - unless there has been some drastic upheaval there that I have not heard about - being absolutely as ready to write as any pen manufactured yesterday, if not more so. I know them from several years ago as a very very reputable and helpful company. No need to worry about a vintage pen from them, or any other reputable dealer.

    But then, if you are trying to amass 50 of any one brand of pen, you are probably looking at the bigger online stores which carry every single color of a new pen, or maybe at Amazon for some of them, rather than operations which do a wonderful job with vintage, so you might not know that. Even if you use a bigger store that also sells vintage, you might not realize they do - and vintage pens from those sources are often (not exclusively) the high end ones, and not necessarily that old.

    I do know that it used to be a little easier to get lots of vintage celluloid that needed work. I mean, lots with many pens, and more in my price range. I bought several of these 6-10 years ago - I have been looking lately and not seeing lots I want to bid on, or that I can afford if I do.

  7. #66
    Senior Member christof's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Confoederatio Helvetica
    Posts
    1,038
    Thanks
    512
    Thanked 2,891 Times in 703 Posts
    Rep Power
    13

    Default Re: Vintage Pens today - An Observation

    Quote Originally Posted by penwash View Post

    A funny side note: At the beginning, I thought I would keep some of the most pristine, popular and desirable pens in my collection. Years later, what I found out is that my collection gravitates towards pens that I spend the most time restoring, or the ones that I love just because, warts and all
    A good collection needs a topic or a focus. Your focus seems to be the personal relation you have to the pens in your collection. This is great.

    I have started to sell pens that I absoultely wanted to keep in the past. But our lives don't last forever and I love the idea to influence who gets my treasures in future.

    I have also started to sell some of my pens with very flexible nibs because I think that writing with a flexible nib is an wonderful experience that many people should be able to have.
    Last edited by christof; September 28th, 2021 at 07:23 AM.

  8. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to christof For This Useful Post:

    Jon Szanto (September 28th, 2021), penwash (September 28th, 2021)

  9. #67
    Senior Member penwash's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    Dallas, as in the 80's TV Series
    Posts
    3,339
    Thanks
    2,639
    Thanked 5,089 Times in 1,697 Posts
    Rep Power
    11

    Default Re: Vintage Pens today - An Observation

    Quote Originally Posted by christof View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by penwash View Post

    A funny side note: At the beginning, I thought I would keep some of the most pristine, popular and desirable pens in my collection. Years later, what I found out is that my collection gravitates towards pens that I spend the most time restoring, or the ones that I love just because, warts and all
    A good collection needs a topic or a focus. Your focus seems to be the personal relation you have to the pens in your collection. This is great.
    That's one good way to put it.

    Quote Originally Posted by christof View Post
    I have started to sell pens that I absoultely wanted to keep in the past. But our lives don't last forever and I love the idea to influence who gets my treasures in future.

    I have also started to sell some of my pens with very flexible nibs because I think that writing with a flexible nib is an wonderful experience that many people should be able to have.
    You hit the nail on the head.

    Last weekend at the Dallas Pen Show, I get to do one of my most favorite thing in this hobby, that is introducing vintage pens and flexible writing to those who has never seen them (and there are many of those who came to a pen show, can you imagine how many more out there?)

    The way faces just light up, is something that I cannot get tired of.
    - Will
    Unique and restored vintage pens: Redeem Pens

  10. The Following User Says Thank You to penwash For This Useful Post:

    Sailor Kenshin (September 28th, 2021)

  11. #68
    Senior Member Empty_of_Clouds's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    2,629
    Thanks
    601
    Thanked 2,077 Times in 998 Posts
    Rep Power
    10

    Default Re: Vintage Pens today - An Observation

    It's frustrating to hear you both talking about flexible nibs which are out of reach for me!

  12. #69
    Senior Member penwash's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    Dallas, as in the 80's TV Series
    Posts
    3,339
    Thanks
    2,639
    Thanked 5,089 Times in 1,697 Posts
    Rep Power
    11

    Default Re: Vintage Pens today - An Observation

    Quote Originally Posted by Empty_of_Clouds View Post
    It's frustrating to hear you both talking about flexible nibs which are out of reach for me!
    How come?

    I thought you and others already found "the one" with the Blue Dew (?) nib.
    - Will
    Unique and restored vintage pens: Redeem Pens

  13. #70
    Senior Member Empty_of_Clouds's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    2,629
    Thanks
    601
    Thanked 2,077 Times in 998 Posts
    Rep Power
    10

    Default Re: Vintage Pens today - An Observation

    It's about having choices.

  14. #71
    Senior Member FredRydr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Carlisle, Pennsylvania USA
    Posts
    4,058
    Thanks
    1,048
    Thanked 4,758 Times in 2,021 Posts
    Rep Power
    15

    Default Re: Vintage Pens today - An Observation

    Quote Originally Posted by penwash View Post
    ...I thought you and others already found "the one" with the Blue Dew (?) nib.
    Will, I don't know the context of your comment, but I'll address the BlueDew. There is an aspect of that pen that is rather vintage in character. IMHO, the BlueDew is for all practical purposes a dip pen with a reservoir attached to it. That is, the nib feels and behaves like a dip pen, and it must be respected as such or suffer the consequences. I have a difficult time using those kinds of nibs, but the convenience of the steady ink supply in this pen keeps me trying. As much as I prefer my vintage fountain pens for flex nibs, I prefer the Blue Dew over my 19th century dip pens. I think I'll keep it, for a while, anyway. It only cost 88 bucks.

  15. #72
    Senior Member guyy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Brooklyn NY
    Posts
    775
    Thanks
    381
    Thanked 598 Times in 340 Posts
    Rep Power
    5

    Default Re: Vintage Pens today - An Observation

    Quote Originally Posted by Empty_of_Clouds View Post
    It's frustrating to hear you both talking about flexible nibs which are out of reach for me!
    I believe there was/is a Waterman pink for sale right here. Someone enjoying a windfall might grab it. Iím sure shipping to NZ could be worked out.

  16. #73
    Senior Member Empty_of_Clouds's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    2,629
    Thanks
    601
    Thanked 2,077 Times in 998 Posts
    Rep Power
    10

    Default Re: Vintage Pens today - An Observation

    Too rich for my tastes. I am a bit gun shy when prices go over a certain level, irrespective of how much cash I have on hand. Old habits die hard I guess. On the plus side, I just received an ebonite feed for my 912 FA, and it works a treat!

    The Blue-Dew is interesting, and I did provide a link in a different thread to a calligrapher's review of the pen. I was rather hoping the nib units would fit a Jowo compatible pen, but alas they are Bock housed.

  17. #74
    Senior Member penwash's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    Dallas, as in the 80's TV Series
    Posts
    3,339
    Thanks
    2,639
    Thanked 5,089 Times in 1,697 Posts
    Rep Power
    11

    Default Re: Vintage Pens today - An Observation

    Quote Originally Posted by FredRydr View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by penwash View Post
    ...I thought you and others already found "the one" with the Blue Dew (?) nib.
    Will, I don't know the context of your comment, but I'll address the BlueDew. There is an aspect of that pen that is rather vintage in character. IMHO, the BlueDew is for all practical purposes a dip pen with a reservoir attached to it. That is, the nib feels and behaves like a dip pen, and it must be respected as such or suffer the consequences. I have a difficult time using those kinds of nibs, but the convenience of the steady ink supply in this pen keeps me trying. As much as I prefer my vintage fountain pens for flex nibs, I prefer the Blue Dew over my 19th century dip pens. I think I'll keep it, for a while, anyway. It only cost 88 bucks.
    Fred, I was referring to David's thread https://fpgeeks.com/forum/showthread...ex-enthusiasts

    It appears to me that the Blue Dew has good enough flex to satisfy a lot of people.
    Your experiences with that nib may be useful in that thread for the education of many.
    - Will
    Unique and restored vintage pens: Redeem Pens

  18. #75
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2019
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    1,620
    Thanks
    329
    Thanked 543 Times in 369 Posts
    Rep Power
    4

    Default Re: Vintage Pens today - An Observation

    Okay, Iím late to this dance, but my interest is for the times of which I grew up and those of my grandparents.

    I suspect subsequent generations to be interested In the Ď70, Ď80ís, and later. That said a small subset might want to go back further.

    In my new abode, mid century modern is the theme.

  19. #76
    Senior Member welch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    620
    Thanks
    993
    Thanked 308 Times in 197 Posts
    Rep Power
    9

    Default Re: Vintage Pens today - An Observation

    Quote Originally Posted by scud80 View Post
    As a person fairly new to the hobby (~6 months), vintage is intimidating. Modern pens are much easier to deal with, and by the time I'm getting comfortable enough with the knowledge to where I might look at vintage I already have plenty of pens.

    My personal problem with most vintage pens is that they're tiny, and the large ones are expensive. I'm most comfortable with a section that's around 11mm, and that's hard to find on vintage pens. Anything under 10mm I don't want to bother with unless it's a pocket pen, and even those are just because I have a thing for pocket pens and not because it's more comfortable on them. I would guess that many people who get into the hobby now might find something similar, since pens now are just bigger. They're not mandatory to have like they used to be which makes size less important, so they become more like show pieces with the large forms and bright colors/designs. Small vintage pens don't have that presence for me.

    Again, this is just what I've found after 6 months so maybe my whole attitude will change in another 6.
    Interesting angle.

    Try a Parker 51, the best fountain pen ever made, the "pen everyone waited for" because Parker (and Sheaffer ant Onoto, for three) shifted to making parts for the Allied war effort. The 51 is just big enough, at 5 3/8 inches capped, and they last forever. Millions were made and sold, meaning there are many 51s waiting for you and many parts waiting if needed.

    There are several people who check over pens before selling them. Some are on Ebay and some have websites. A few, of many: Parker51.com, Vacumania, and several on EBay. You can spot the EBay sellers who have cleaned out and checked and, if necessary, repaired their P-51s.

    A nifty thing about the aerometric 51s is that the sacs seem never to wear out. I accumulated about two dozen beginning about 15 years ago, and each was happy to write as soon as I flushed it. Of course a few had fine nibs that I replaced with a medium, and I've sent a few off to have nibs tuned, but that is no big deal.

    The earlier model, the Parker 51 Vacumatic, used a "sac" that usually wears out, but there are many, many fine repair people who will replace the "sac" inexpensively.

    By the way, people collect some of the rare colors in the Parker 51, so look first for an aerometric in black or "burgundy", and don't be stunned if you see a "buckskin beige" for $600. That's an unusual pen, very collectible.

    The downside of a Parker 51: it was designed to write, rather than be a piece of jewelry. Parker design-engineers thought through everything about it, figuring a way that a slip-off cap could keep a pen from dring out, creating two sort of ink reservoirs, one of which wraps around the nib so it is ready to write as soon as the nib touches paper. Sheaffer followed with a nib that stored some ink inside, and, later, all pens figured out ways to do the same, such as the "modern" pens that have "plastic" leaves under the nib. Parker was the first.

    Finally, the beauty of the 51 is in its streamlined shape. Previous pens usually looked like 1920s hotels, with decorations hanging every which way. Like comparing the shape of a Model-T Ford to nearly any car sold today. Yes, a streamlined pen, one shaped like a jet fighter or a rocket or a P-51 fighter, might look ho-hum today, it was part of the design revolution that made such shapes "ho-hum". And, meanwhile, "modern" pens are going for glitzy decorations, a design that rolls back to the 1920s hotels.

    Price? Last I looked, a 51 could be had for $80 - $120 on EBay. Total renovation might add another $40, if a pen needs it.

  20. #77
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    59
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 4 Times in 3 Posts
    Rep Power
    8

    Default Re: Vintage Pens today - An Observation

    A funny side note: At the beginning, I thought I would keep some of the most pristine, popular and desirable pens in my collection. Years later, what I found out is that my collection gravitates towards pens that I spend the most time restoring, or the ones that I love just because, warts and all
    So true, that! It's the troupers that keep on trouping that are hard to let go . . . .

    R.

  21. #78
    FPG Donor ♕ KrazyIvan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Texas-USA
    Posts
    5,046
    Thanks
    1,463
    Thanked 1,780 Times in 934 Posts
    Rep Power
    17

    Default Re: Vintage Pens today - An Observation

    My first fountain pens were modern C/C filling pens. I naturally progressed into vintage pens starting with Esterbrooks. At the time I was a PBX admin for a large call center and found out Bell Systems Esterbrooks existed and then it just went into a downward spiral when I found out about this really cool-looking celluloid material. Oh, then I discovered ebonite. Can't forget the ebonite. My oldest pen is over 100 years old and the vintage pens still fascinate me.

    I think Jon hit it early in this thread. The people that really matter in the vintage pen arena don't really use social media that much or stick to older formats with less exposure. As an example, I have noticed the big Youtubers don't really talk vintage pens that much. SBREBrown has said he does not prefer vintage pens and keeps to modern pens.
    Fountain Pen Sith Lord | Daakusaido | Everything in one spot

  22. #79
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    Clinging desperately to planet Earth
    Posts
    371
    Thanks
    31
    Thanked 355 Times in 210 Posts
    Rep Power
    6

    Default Re: Vintage Pens today - An Observation

    'SBREBrown has said he does not prefer vintage pens and keeps to modern pens.' Given that he is a youtuber and youtube is more about acquiring sponsorships ($$$) than it is about providing information, one wonders if that is motivated by hopes of acquiring current manufacturer sponsors.

    I doubt any vintage (now defunct) manufacturers are likely to provide sponsorships.

  23. The Following User Says Thank You to An old bloke For This Useful Post:

    guyy (October 6th, 2021)

  24. #80
    Senior Member fountainpenkid's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Nouvelle Angleterre
    Posts
    3,513
    Thanks
    3,174
    Thanked 1,067 Times in 530 Posts
    Rep Power
    14

    Default Re: Vintage Pens today - An Observation

    Quote Originally Posted by An old bloke View Post
    'SBREBrown has said he does not prefer vintage pens and keeps to modern pens.' Given that he is a youtuber and youtube is more about acquiring sponsorships ($$$) than it is about providing information, one wonders if that is motivated by hopes of acquiring current manufacturer sponsors.

    I doubt any vintage (now defunct) manufacturers are likely to provide sponsorships.
    That's surely a bit cynical--I think while SBREBrown's reviews are often surprisingly incurious for an academic, he is honest.
    The point generally is taken though--as pointed out earlier, there is less media incentive for vintage pen-related content. It does make me wonder if there would be interest in historically informed vintage pen content--such media does get traction on youtube at least, in the general vein of what I'd call "entertaining explainers."
    Last edited by fountainpenkid; October 6th, 2021 at 02:50 PM.
    Will
    If my p.m box is full, feel free to email me at dabantur@gmail.com.

  25. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to fountainpenkid For This Useful Post:

    catbert (October 6th, 2021), Detman101 (October 7th, 2021)

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •