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Thread: For flex enthusiasts

  1. #21
    Senior Member Empty_of_Clouds's Avatar
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    Default Re: For flex enthusiasts

    I don't know if that is the case, Detman101. The nibs appear to be the brainchild of someone (Jeffery, I think) over at Blue-Dew in Singapore. If Aaron's Pens are using the same nib I have to conclude that they are buying them in from Blue-Dew. I have no evidence to the contrary.

    @guyy, according to the video by Brown, the feed is actually ebonite. As far as tipping is concerned, it is an issue with vintage dip nibs, but the practice IIRC was to regrind a worn nib with a bit of an abrasive material. Not sure how many calligraphers still do that though.


    Edit to add: I posted this topic on a calligraphy forum and some members are going to try them out and report back. Bear in mind that these members are pointed pen calligraphers so won't be phased by the lack of tipping. My guess is that they'll be concentrating on hairlines, swells and ink flow.
    Last edited by Empty_of_Clouds; September 11th, 2021 at 04:16 PM.

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  3. #22
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    Default Re: For flex enthusiasts

    Quote Originally Posted by Empty_of_Clouds View Post
    I don't know if that is the case, Detman101. The nibs appear to be the brainchild of someone (Jeffery, I think) over at Blue-Dew in Singapore. If Aaron's Pens are using the same nib I have to conclude that they are buying them in from Blue-Dew. I have no evidence to the contrary.

    @guyy, according to the video by Brown, the feed is actually ebonite. As far as tipping is concerned, it is an issue with vintage dip nibs, but the practice IIRC was to regrind a worn nib with a bit of an abrasive material. Not sure how many calligraphers still do that though.


    Edit to add: I posted this topic on a calligraphy forum and some members are going to try them out and report back. Bear in mind that these members are pointed pen calligraphers so won't be phased by the lack of tipping. My guess is that they'll be concentrating on hairlines, swells and ink flow.
    Hmmm...interesting. I certainly hope that Blue-Dew is selling the nibs to these other flankers...not just getting ripped off. Jeffery Lim is a smart guy, I'm sure he will end up on top.

    Ebonite? How in the world did SBRE get an ebonite feed in the one he tested?? I have looked at the feeds that came in the 2-unit purchase I made...and the ones I received were indeed plastic...and they melt when set to flame, unlike ebonite...which burns.

    Nevertheless, I'm interested in how the replies at the calligraphy forum turn out. Blue Dew are great nibs and like I said...I had to shell out almost $400 to get the same nib performance by a nibmeister.
    The Blue-Dew nibs cost me $30.

    Like they say...Hindsight is 20/20
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    Default Re: For flex enthusiasts

    Thanks for your input Detman101, there are certainly questions to be asked of these nib.

    Did you use the BD nibs in their original housing or swap the nib and feed into something else?


    I'm not going to agree or disagree with your 'best of' list, except to say that it appears that FP users are satisfied with something a bit different to pointed pen calligraphers. A distinction rather than a criticism.

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    Default Re: For flex enthusiasts

    Quote Originally Posted by Empty_of_Clouds View Post
    Thanks for your input Detman101, there are certainly questions to be asked of these nib.

    Did you use the BD nibs in their original housing or swap the nib and feed into something else?


    I'm not going to agree or disagree with your 'best of' list, except to say that it appears that FP users are satisfied with something a bit different to pointed pen calligraphers. A distinction rather than a criticism.
    Anytime, I fully understand where everyone stands. These BD nibs are not widely known or used outside of the instagram calligraphy community.
    It's not even my #1 nib choice anymore now that I'm with SODF.

    To answer your question, I used the BD nibs in their original housing to start with. I still have the original housings saved, however I use them in Penbbs Pens with Ebonite Penbbs Units from Flexible Nib Factory (FnF).
    Mainly because that is what I am used to and all of my pens have FnF ebonite feeds/housings. The original plastic BD housings worked just fine when I first received them.

    Not a problem, that list was formulated to respond to another question on another fountain-pen forum. It is in no way expected to be a definitive answer for anyone other than myself.
    "I can only improve my self, not the world."

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    Default Re: For flex enthusiasts

    Quote Originally Posted by Empty_of_Clouds View Post


    I'm not going to agree or disagree with your 'best of' list, except to say that it appears that FP users are satisfied with something a bit different to pointed pen calligraphers. A distinction rather than a criticism.
    I get what you’re saying, EoC. I would just add that i’m writing — or rather, trying, or learning to write — the same hands, but choosing a different tool. I suppose a purist might say “but you can’t, not with that pen.” If and when i gain a modicum of mastery, i may want to ditch the tipped fountain pens for something with finer hairlines and more variation. Maybe, maybe not. After all, there are calligraphers far more proficient than i using fountain pens.

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    Default Re: For flex enthusiasts

    I do the same. My general handwriting kind of mimics what I try to do with a dip pen. Overall I am reasonably okay with it (hardly a ringing endorsement I suppose).

    This is the sort of thing I mean, some random words on a page, trying out different pens and inks. (For the curious the red ink is from a Nagahara fine CI, the dark blue an 823 fine, the green is L2K extra fine, and the lighter blue a Decimo fine)

    Apologies for poor photo quality, was quick snap with phone.


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    Default Re: For flex enthusiasts

    Quote Originally Posted by Empty_of_Clouds View Post
    FP users are satisfied with something a bit different to pointed pen calligraphers. A distinction rather than a criticism.
    It's more than that.

    Even among FP users, the list of things that satisfy in terms of flexible nibs and their usage -- to remain focused on the topic at hand -- could be different from person to person.
    - Will
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    Default Re: For flex enthusiasts

    Are the Flexible Nib Factory feed/housing for the Zebra G dip nibs good? I'll probably pick one up just to play with it a bit, but I'm curious where that falls on the flex quality spectrum.

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    Default Re: For flex enthusiasts

    Quote Originally Posted by Detman101 View Post
    Wow...and now "Blue-Dew" pens has been ripped off.
    These "Aaron Pens" didn't even bother to change the embossed "B" (for "Blue-Dew") on the nib...unbelievable.
    Perry and Co. must be even more livid...

    Perry_pens_ad_1893.jpg

    Apparently that's from 1893, so pre-dates the Blue-Dew just a leetle bit.

    Honestly, I see these things and it looks like a dip nib, walks like a dip dip and quacks like a dip nib, so I'm genuinely confused why anyone would think it's not a dip nib?
    Last edited by grainweevil; September 12th, 2021 at 09:45 AM. Reason: Errant "at"
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    Default Re: For flex enthusiasts

    Quote Originally Posted by scud80 View Post
    Are the Flexible Nib Factory feed/housing for the Zebra G dip nibs good? I'll probably pick one up just to play with it a bit, but I'm curious where that falls on the flex quality spectrum.
    Of all the Zebra G housings, it's the one I've had the best results with - simply because it's been made for it rather than just modified from other bits, and the ebonite is very high quality. It also doesn't require any nib bending to make them fit. If you're happy with a Zebra G, it should work fine for you. You do still need to pull the nib and clean/dry it after use if you want to maximise its life, however, and it still won't last for long - it's not really designed to though. It can't be compared to a vintage nib, but it has its place, especially for practice!

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    Default Re: For flex enthusiasts

    Had a bit of back and forth with the Aaron Pen company person about their nibs, and got a bunch of statements in response:

    This is NOT another G nib conversion. The nib is designed by our team (consulted by a professional calligrapher and a caliber nib technician), taking inspiration from the dip nibs that are mostly rusted in a short time (and many got issues with the ink flow). The nib is rust-resistant, made from Stainless Steel 316 (also known as surgical steel, marine-grade steel).
    'We don't buy the nib from another brand and/or related to any other brands as of now. Hope it clarifies.
    The nib should last for years (depending on how you maintain & use it, of course).

    The only easily observable difference in the nibs of the two companies appears to be the shape of the breather hole. Why do they both use the letter "B" on the nib? Both companies claim to be making their own nibs.

    All a bit head-scratchy to me.

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  21. #32
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    Default Re: For flex enthusiasts

    Quote Originally Posted by scud80 View Post
    Are the Flexible Nib Factory feed/housing for the Zebra G dip nibs good? I'll probably pick one up just to play with it a bit, but I'm curious where that falls on the flex quality spectrum.
    They are indeed good, better than a plastic feed. You won't have any issues with ink starvation when writing long passages of text when you're running the FNF Ebonite feeds.
    "I can only improve my self, not the world."

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    Default Re: For flex enthusiasts

    Quote Originally Posted by Empty_of_Clouds View Post
    Had a bit of back and forth with the Aaron Pen company person about their nibs, and got a bunch of statements in response:

    This is NOT another G nib conversion. The nib is designed by our team (consulted by a professional calligrapher and a caliber nib technician), taking inspiration from the dip nibs that are mostly rusted in a short time (and many got issues with the ink flow). The nib is rust-resistant, made from Stainless Steel 316 (also known as surgical steel, marine-grade steel).
    'We don't buy the nib from another brand and/or related to any other brands as of now. Hope it clarifies.
    The nib should last for years (depending on how you maintain & use it, of course).

    The only easily observable difference in the nibs of the two companies appears to be the shape of the breather hole. Why do they both use the letter "B" on the nib? Both companies claim to be making their own nibs.

    All a bit head-scratchy to me.
    The third statement is correct.
    However, I would bet money that their second statement and part of the first are flat-out lies.
    They are buying them from SOMEONE or they've clearly broken copyright/trademark rules....lol.
    Their nib is literally, EXACTLY like "BlueDew" nibs down to the horizontal carved lines across the tines and ESPECIALLY the embossed "B" which stands for "B-LUEDEW"...
    They're full of it!
    Last edited by Detman101; September 16th, 2021 at 12:58 PM.
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    Default Re: For flex enthusiasts

    From my conversations it seems highly possible that both companies are buying their nibs from the same source. Nothing wrong with that, lots of brands do the same. Of course, their separate websites each make a statement about their own involvement in the development of the nib they are selling. Which on the face of it seems unlikely.

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    Default Re: For flex enthusiasts

    I bought a NOS Mabie Todd Blackbird (still had the price tag: 14 shilling/8 pence) with a new bladder from FPG's own Deb. It has a full flex nib made of 14K, writes absolutely beautifully, and cost me about the same as a steel-nibbed Blue-Dew pen would cost. (Inflation, you know -- 14/8 is just under 75p if you convert shillings and pence to new pence.) It's a gorgeous marbled green celluloid, too.
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    Default Re: For flex enthusiasts

    And does it give a hairline without pressure? That's really the goal for pointed pen enthusiasts - hairlines and expressive (but not excessive) swells!

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    Default Re: For flex enthusiasts

    Quote Originally Posted by calamus View Post
    I bought a NOS Mabie Todd Blackbird (still had the price tag: 14 shilling/8 pence) with a new bladder from FPG's own Deb. It has a full flex nib made of 14K, writes absolutely beautifully, and cost me about the same as a steel-nibbed Blue-Dew pen would cost. (Inflation, you know -- 14/8 is just under 75p if you convert shillings and pence to new pence.) It's a gorgeous marbled green celluloid, too.
    Very pleased you like it, Calamus. Mabie Todd are rightly famous for their nibs.

  31. #38
    Senior Member Detman101's Avatar
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    Default Re: For flex enthusiasts

    Quote Originally Posted by calamus View Post
    I bought a NOS Mabie Todd Blackbird (still had the price tag: 14 shilling/8 pence) with a new bladder from FPG's own Deb. It has a full flex nib made of 14K, writes absolutely beautifully, and cost me about the same as a steel-nibbed Blue-Dew pen would cost. (Inflation, you know -- 14/8 is just under 75p if you convert shillings and pence to new pence.) It's a gorgeous marbled green celluloid, too.
    How nice! Congrats! I purchased my 1905 Mabie Todd Swan from Deb as well. She walked me through the process of selecting a vintage pen and their selection is amazing. This Mabie Todd Swan is an elegant pen with engraved gold collars and with great flex, but far too small for my large hands. It's the star of my collection however.
    "I can only improve my self, not the world."

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  33. #39
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    Default Re: For flex enthusiasts

    I was a big fan of Mabie Todd for a while (was moderator of that subforum in the other place, for my sins). Was being the operative word. Unfortunately my connection with a specific seller in the UK and the apparent lack of truly fine nibbed MT pens kind of soured on me. More so the former than the latter it has to be said. Never came across or been offered a genuine fine nib (or extra fine for that matter). Would have liked to have a nice example, but kind of given up on them now. My favourite design was the SM2. I gave one away to the aforementioned seller. Big mistake.

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    Default Re: For flex enthusiasts

    Fine and EF Swan nibs come along all the time, not as common as the mediums but by no means uncommon.

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