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Thread: The lived experiences of people who engage in meditational practices.

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    Senior Member Chip's Avatar
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    Default Re: The lived experiences of people who engage in meditational practices.

    New Zealand has some beaut mountains. We stayed a while at Arthur's Pass and had some grand drives among the South Island Alps. The maritime weather was different to what I know: there'd be an ice storm raging above our heads, and avalanches booming down, while we got a light drizzle.

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    Senior Member Chip's Avatar
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    Default Re: The lived experiences of people who engage in meditational practices.

    I grew up landlocked. Didn't see the ocean until I was 17 or so.

    I learned to sail in NZ and kept on with it here, on the local lakes with a light wood skiff.

    Hazards aside, I trust deserts and mountains and snow and ice and fast rivers. But sailing, and the ocean, still arouse a sort of dread in me.

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    Senior Member Chip's Avatar
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    Default Re: The lived experiences of people who engage in meditational practices.

    Another thought: in fall, the desert rivers I ran could get strong upstream winds. So my boat could be blown upstream against the current, unless I rowed hard.

    I found that setting a rhythm between my breath and my stroke, and keeping it steady despite changes in the wind, really helped. Instead of being pissed off and frustrated, I'd enter that flow state, where the river, the wind, and my effort all seemed like one fabric.

    When I was acting upset, it would make my dog nervous and she'd fidget and be unable to find a comfortable position. When I got into that flow state, she would cuddle up and snooze, waking up for the rapids.


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    Default Re: The lived experiences of people who engage in meditational practices.

    Most of our equipment came from NRS. We still use a 1980's Bills Bag. Great company.

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    Senior Member Chip's Avatar
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    Default Re: The lived experiences of people who engage in meditational practices.

    I get cat tubes, bags, Paco pads, etc. from Jack's Plastic Welding. Met Jack many years ago when he was just starting the company. He invited me on his Grand Canyon trip, with a bunch of new boats to demo.

    I paddled a Fat Pack Cat—



    —or rowed a Cutthroat for the entire trip.



    160 named rapids with 80 rated difficult. I swam five times.

    Trip of a lifetime!

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    Default Re: The lived experiences of people who engage in meditational practices.

    Being in Eastern Tennessee and North Carolina, my experiences are with tight, technical, steep creeks mostly rain fed so that you never run the same section twice.

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    Senior Member Chip's Avatar
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    Default Re: The lived experiences of people who engage in meditational practices.

    That sounds cool. Jack designed a small paddle cat, the Pack Cat, that could be broken down and backpacked to streams with no road access. At about 25 lb., you could also carry lightweight camp gear and a few days food and fuel. The Wind River Range, on the Continental Divide, where I lived and worked for years, has lots of steep, rockbound headwater streams, fed by glaciers and snowmelt, that can be rather sporty.

    Our drill was to backpack upstream with a notebook, scouting the run, looking for strainers and falls and other hazards. When we got to the point where the creek was no longer passable, too rocky and steep, we'd camp and start the run the next morning.

    Pack Cats were also the ticket for desert canyons where the launch or the take-out could be miles from the nearest road. Here's my sweetie, on our Escalante River trip in Utah, when a big snowpack made it viable.



    Here are our Pack Cats parked in a tributary, in full expedition mode. Mine (rear) is a two-seater that was our camp hauler, beer barge, and toilet rig.


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