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Thread: Mystery inks - bonus/homage?

  1. #161
    FPG Donor ♕ Chrissy's Avatar
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    Default Re: Mystery inks - bonus/homage?

    Quote Originally Posted by Yazeh View Post
    @Lithium, I can understand why the GV Faber-Castell is such a disappointment. Lapis lazuli, the gem is such a fascinated gem. The blue is so deep, that I wonder if it's possible to capture that in an ink, not to mention the flecks of gold. I've seen lapis lazuli stones that are a dark blue black. The only other GVFC ink I tried was Stone Grey (cartridges) it was nightmare to use, as the ink refused to budge. But when I used the Sailor method () ), i.e. with a syringe it was much more pleasant to use.

    @Chrissy, Faber-Castell and GvFC, in my opinion are not made by the same company, The former ink (turquoise) was wet and lubricated. GvFC is definitely dry and below average lubrication.
    I have to disagree and say that surely Faber-Castell and their "top quality range" Graf von Faber-Castell inks cannot possibly be made by different manufacturers just because one of the inks or even "brands" might feel drier than the other. That might always be the case with every manufacturer. Both are owned by the same company and must be made in the same place or the company would be paying twice as much for two different manufactures to make their inks unless they make it themselves.

    Pelikan 4001 is known everywhere as a dry ink but Pelikan Edelstein ink has "special lubrication" so they can make them in the same factory with no problem at all. J. Herbin can make J.Herbin inks that may tend to show-through more than Jaques Herbin inks, yet they make them in the same factory. Diamine makes some inks that are much drier than others and some that are much wetter than others. The manufacturing factory doesn't have to be different just because some of the inks might perform differently. I will never believe that could ever be the case.
    Regards, Chrissy | My Review Blog: inkyfountainpens

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  3. #162
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    Default Re: Mystery inks - bonus/homage?

    Quote Originally Posted by Yazeh View Post
    @Lithium, I can understand why the GV Faber-Castell is such a disappointment. Lapis lazuli, the gem is such a fascinated gem. The blue is so deep, that I wonder if it's possible to capture that in an ink, not to mention the flecks of gold. I've seen lapis lazuli stones that are a dark blue black.
    Taoism: the art of not trying
    It's like GvFC didn't even try...there are some decent things that can be done with a mix of the various methyl/methylene blue and violet (think Visconti blue)!

    Ok enough ranting, Lapislazuli flows well enough in my very dry Pilot Capless special alloy (steel) nib, dries quickly, behaves well enough, and the colour is appropriate enough for office use. Too bad it just cost 5x the price of Waterman Serenity blue or Pelikan 4001.

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  5. #163
    Senior Member Yazeh's Avatar
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    Default Re: Mystery inks - bonus/homage?

    Quote Originally Posted by Chrissy View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Yazeh View Post
    @Lithium, I can understand why the GV Faber-Castell is such a disappointment. Lapis lazuli, the gem is such a fascinated gem. The blue is so deep, that I wonder if it's possible to capture that in an ink, not to mention the flecks of gold. I've seen lapis lazuli stones that are a dark blue black. The only other GVFC ink I tried was Stone Grey (cartridges) it was nightmare to use, as the ink refused to budge. But when I used the Sailor method () ), i.e. with a syringe it was much more pleasant to use.

    @Chrissy, Faber-Castell and GvFC, in my opinion are not made by the same company, The former ink (turquoise) was wet and lubricated. GvFC is definitely dry and below average lubrication.
    I have to disagree and say that surely Faber-Castell and their "top quality range" Graf von Faber-Castell inks cannot possibly be made by different manufacturers just because one of the inks or even "brands" might feel drier than the other. That might always be the case with every manufacturer. Both are owned by the same company and must be made in the same place or the company would be paying twice as much for two different manufactures to make their inks unless they make it themselves.

    Pelikan 4001 is known everywhere as a dry ink but Pelikan Edelstein ink has "special lubrication" so they can make them in the same factory with no problem at all. J. Herbin can make J.Herbin inks that may tend to show-through more than Jaques Herbin inks, yet they make them in the same factory. Diamine makes some inks that are much drier than others and some that are much wetter than others. The manufacturing factory doesn't have to be different just because some of the inks might perform differently. I will never believe that could ever be the case.
    You have a point there. There's a difference between Jacques and J(ack) Herbin inks. J Herbin's are often watery, where Jacques seems different. But then there's always the possibility that Pelikan made the FC inks and then Faber-Castell started making their own inks. Anyway there's no shortage of German ink makers

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  7. #164
    FPG Donor ♕ Chrissy's Avatar
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    Default Re: Mystery inks - bonus/homage?

    One german pen brand actually told me themselves that their branded ink was made in the same factory as Caran d'Ache ink. While there are loads of inks around they need a big place to make them and there are fewer big ink factories around than you might think.
    Regards, Chrissy | My Review Blog: inkyfountainpens

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    Default Re: Mystery inks - bonus/homage?

    Kaweco?

  10. #166
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    Default Re: Mystery inks - bonus/homage?

    Quote Originally Posted by Lithium466 View Post
    Kaweco?
    Yep. According to them their original Paradise Blue was meant to be the same as Caran d'Ache Earth colour Caribbean Sea.
    Regards, Chrissy | My Review Blog: inkyfountainpens

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  12. #167
    FPG Donor ♕ Chrissy's Avatar
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    Default Re: Mystery inks - bonus/homage?

    Mystery ink E is a bright red that I believe I used to have. I still have an ink that is almost exactly the same and has the same chroma. It has a very distinctive chroma test that is almost always used by one ink manufacturer to make these bright red inks while other manufacturers tend to use a different single dye.

    Lithium E 1a.jpg
    Regards, Chrissy | My Review Blog: inkyfountainpens

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