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Thread: Pilot PO nib - additional "feature"

  1. #21
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    Default Re: Pilot PO nib - additional "feature"

    $186 Dollars...hmm...Thanks for telling the price.

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    Default Re: Pilot PO nib - additional "feature"

    Quote Originally Posted by bunny roller View Post
    Pilot PO nib is very good pen but has a certain disadvantages !!
    Hello,

    Just curious, what are the disadvantages of the PO nib?

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    Default Re: Pilot PO nib - additional "feature"

    I have a Pilot 912 with a PO nib. It's perfect and incredibly smooth for such an extra-extra fine nib.

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    Junior Member Bart Willems's Avatar
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    Default Re: Pilot PO nib - additional "feature"

    Quote Originally Posted by Basu988 View Post
    Well, that isn't a random thing if a person doesn't know about it. Isn't it?
    While nobody is supposed to be omniscient, being surprised that Pilot makes fountain pens on a fountain pen forum is a bit like asking on a car forum if it is true that Ford makes cars.

    To be fair, Staples and most other office supply stores in the USA will only offer ballpoints, rollerballs and gel pens from pilot, and even when you visit the Pilot website you'll have to search hard for them (because even the Pilot branded fountain pens are listed under “Namiki collection.”)

    Pilot makes pens with sensationally smooth nibs, even the cheapest Varsities (disposables for around $2 each when bought in bulk) have surprisingly good nibs. From there you can get a Pilot at pretty much any price you can imagine, but the Custom Heritage mentioned in this post costs around $220. To get acquinted with the brand you might want to start with a cheaper Metropolitan or Kakuno (less than $20) or perhaps a Prera (around $40) although they don't come with a PO nib.

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    Default Re: Pilot PO nib - additional "feature"

    Thanks for review.
    I think about PO nib.
    If #15 PO nib give me more than #10 PO?

  7. #26
    Senior Member dfo's Avatar
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    Default Re: Pilot PO nib - additional "feature"

    Quote Originally Posted by konrad_white View Post
    Thanks for review.
    I think about PO nib.
    If #15 PO nib give me more than #10 PO?
    Pilot pens with a #15 nib do cost more than those with a #10.

    I don't see the point in choosing a #15 PO nib over a #10 PO. Both nibs are super rigid and get the same amount of ink to the point. If you want a tad larger nib, go with the #15, but the size doesn't change the writing experience.
    "Love is the final fight."

  8. #27
    Junior Member awa54's Avatar
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    Default Re: Pilot PO nib - additional "feature"

    My only "posting" nib so far is in a 1960s Pilot E switch-filler, it's about as smooth as an extra fine nib can be and it's virtually feather proof due to the very dry line it lays down. At first I was concerned that it would be prone to skipping or drying out if left un-capped for a few minutes, but it seems to be pretty much immune to any of the issues you might expect from a dry writing EF nib!

    If Pilot made a PO in the 5 sized nibs I'd jump on one, but the 912, 742 and 743 are all just a bit bigger than I prefer.


    P.S.
    Pilot's description of the purpose behind the PO nib would tend to support your results with low quality paper, since they designed it to write on postcards that were made of soft, fibrous paper.
    Last edited by awa54; August 1st, 2019 at 07:39 AM. Reason: additional thoughts
    David-

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