Page 3 of 15 FirstFirst 1234513 ... LastLast
Results 41 to 60 of 295

Thread: Fountain Pens in Movies and TV

  1. #41
    Senior Member gweddig's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    163
    Thanks
    53
    Thanked 92 Times in 48 Posts
    Rep Power
    6

    Default Re: Fountain Pens in Movies and TV

    Been watching the first season of The Twilight Zone, many episodes have a pen shown in them. A dual pen Sheaffer desk set appears several times in different episodes, likely the same one.
    One alternate future episode had what appeared to be a Eversharp Skyline pencil in the background ("Third from the Sun" @ 23:00 or so).

  2. #42
    Senior Member carlos.q's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    On a hill in Puerto Rico
    Posts
    892
    Thanks
    724
    Thanked 751 Times in 325 Posts
    Rep Power
    6

    Default Re: Fountain Pens in Movies and TV

    In the 1965 film "Morituri", the character played by Marlon Brando checks a diagram that shows where explosive charges are placed in the German ship "Ingo". To the left of the diagram a bottle of ink that looks suspiciously like a Sheaffer Skrip bottle:

    skrip.jpg

  3. #43
    Senior Member carlos.q's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    On a hill in Puerto Rico
    Posts
    892
    Thanks
    724
    Thanked 751 Times in 325 Posts
    Rep Power
    6

    Default Re: Fountain Pens in Movies and TV

    In last weeks episode of NCIS, the agents find a box at a crime scene. When they open the box the dialog is hilarious:
    McGee: "A pen?"
    DiNozzo: "Standard gift for fancy people."

    ncispen.jpg

  4. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to carlos.q For This Useful Post:

    aebaxter (September 6th, 2016), bluefeathers (June 6th, 2015), jadehawk (July 6th, 2015)

  5. #44
    Senior Member dr.grace's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    208
    Thanks
    381
    Thanked 103 Times in 68 Posts
    Rep Power
    6

    Default Re: Fountain Pens in Movies and TV

    Quote Originally Posted by Kaputnik View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by jacksterp View Post


    How in the world do you hold a pen like that?
    Some people do hold their pens fairly high up, but this did seem rather extreme. Still, although I don't know Korean script, and can't judge his handwriting, the actor did seem to be writing quite easily this way. I wondered if it was because Asian forms of writing had traditionally used brushes rather than pens, and you would tend to hold those fairly high. That's just wondering, though; it could just be a quirk of this actor. Someone who actually lives in Korea, or has been there, might be able to comment.
    I think you're right. I only know about Chinese calligraphy, but I believe that Korea and Japan originally borrowed this approach, in which the brush is held just in that way. It gives a compromise between control and flexibility.

    Edit: actually, I think you're supposed to hold the brush between the second and third fingers. So this pen hold is not entirely like brush painting.

  6. #45
    Senior Member carlos.q's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    On a hill in Puerto Rico
    Posts
    892
    Thanks
    724
    Thanked 751 Times in 325 Posts
    Rep Power
    6

    Default Re: Fountain Pens in Movies and TV

    In the 1974 movie "Chinatown", Jack Nicholson is a private investigator with a desk set...

    jackdesk.jpg

    ... and the pen is actually used during a scene to sign a contract:

    Jackcontract.jpg

  7. #46
    Senior Member carlos.q's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    On a hill in Puerto Rico
    Posts
    892
    Thanks
    724
    Thanked 751 Times in 325 Posts
    Rep Power
    6

    Default Re: Fountain Pens in Movies and TV

    In the 2012 politically incorrect satire "The Dictator", the character played by Sacha Baron Cohen ("Admiral General Aladeen") is given a Sheaffer with an inlaid gold nib to sign the new "democratic" constitution of the fictitious country of Wadiya.

    thedictator.jpg

  8. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to carlos.q For This Useful Post:

    fountainpenkid (May 29th, 2015), fqgouvea (May 30th, 2015), kaisnowbird (June 5th, 2015)

  9. #47
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Posts
    124
    Thanks
    101
    Thanked 48 Times in 27 Posts
    Rep Power
    0

    Default Re: Fountain Pens in Movies and TV

    Quote Originally Posted by dr.grace View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Kaputnik View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by jacksterp View Post


    How in the world do you hold a pen like that?
    Some people do hold their pens fairly high up, but this did seem rather extreme. Still, although I don't know Korean script, and can't judge his handwriting, the actor did seem to be writing quite easily this way. I wondered if it was because Asian forms of writing had traditionally used brushes rather than pens, and you would tend to hold those fairly high. That's just wondering, though; it could just be a quirk of this actor. Someone who actually lives in Korea, or has been there, might be able to comment.
    I think you're right. I only know about Chinese calligraphy, but I believe that Korea and Japan originally borrowed this approach, in which the brush is held just in that way. It gives a compromise between control and flexibility.

    Edit: actually, I think you're supposed to hold the brush between the second and third fingers. So this pen hold is not entirely like brush painting.
    I concur the high hold on the pen is very similar to how a calligraphy brush is held. I can't say I've ever seen anyone hold the brush between the second and third finger. The ones I've seen held the brush in a modified tripod, held rather high up the brush handle. One explanation I got from a Korean calligrapher for the high hold was that the traditional Korean clothing had baggy sleeves (which they used as pockets of some sort) and people didn't want to get ink on their sleeves. Perhaps he was pulling my leg. Who knows?

  10. #48
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Posts
    547
    Thanks
    501
    Thanked 499 Times in 221 Posts
    Rep Power
    5

    Default Re: Fountain Pens in Movies and TV

    In Agents of Shield episode 2x14, Coulson's hologram cube doodad is hidden inside his two-pen Sheaffer's desk set
    Desk set 1.png

    and in episode 2x15 another character cuts into it (or, one hopes, a prop replica) to steal it.
    Desk set 2.png

  11. The Following User Says Thank You to catbert For This Useful Post:

    carlos.q (June 5th, 2015)

  12. #49
    Senior Member dr.grace's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    208
    Thanks
    381
    Thanked 103 Times in 68 Posts
    Rep Power
    6

    Default Re: Fountain Pens in Movies and TV

    I was trained by a real Chinese calligrapher and artist to hold the brush between the second and third fingers. It's basically the same way you hold chopsticks. It gives you both control and flexibility for various kinds of brush strokes. You don't need to hold it very far up the handle, except perhaps with a very large brush used for writing huge characters. Korean brush painting was originally derived from the Chinese art, but I don't know how far it's diverged since then.

    Of course, writing with a pen is different. People have various ways of holding pens in Asia, too. And, in filming the movie, they probably wanted the camera to have a good angle to see the writing in the journal, so that may be why this fellow held the pen so high.

  13. #50
    Senior Member kaisnowbird's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Sydney, Australia
    Posts
    1,100
    Thanks
    1,637
    Thanked 611 Times in 346 Posts
    Rep Power
    7

    Default Re: Fountain Pens in Movies and TV

    Quote Originally Posted by dr.grace View Post
    I was trained by a real Chinese calligrapher and artist to hold the brush between the second and third fingers. It's basically the same way you hold chopsticks. It gives you both control and flexibility for various kinds of brush strokes. You don't need to hold it very far up the handle, except perhaps with a very large brush used for writing huge characters. Korean brush painting was originally derived from the Chinese art, but I don't know how far it's diverged since then.

    Of course, writing with a pen is different. People have various ways of holding pens in Asia, too. And, in filming the movie, they probably wanted the camera to have a good angle to see the writing in the journal, so that may be why this fellow held the pen so high.
    I agree with Dr Grace's comments.
    Below is the traditional way to hold a brush in Chinese, Japanese and Korean calligraphy. Although for a brush this size, people seldom hold the brush so high up. In any case, when writing with a brush, no part of the pen holding hand is supposed to touch the paper or the desk.
    Kai

    "Nature does not hurry, yet everything is accomplished." -- Lao Tzu


  14. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to kaisnowbird For This Useful Post:

    Haefennasiel (June 5th, 2015), Kaputnik (June 6th, 2015)

  15. #51
    Senior Member stonerman33's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    133
    Thanks
    8
    Thanked 54 Times in 22 Posts
    Rep Power
    0

    Default Re: Fountain Pens in Movies and TV

    In the new Netflix series Sense8, one of the characters uses her Lawyer's blue AL Star to sign a document. Fair warning if you watch, lots of "adult content"

  16. #52
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    591
    Thanks
    1,468
    Thanked 454 Times in 236 Posts
    Rep Power
    5

    Default Re: Fountain Pens in Movies and TV

    In the movie Hugo, the automaton used a dip pen to draw.

  17. #53
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Posts
    124
    Thanks
    101
    Thanked 48 Times in 27 Posts
    Rep Power
    0

    Default Re: Fountain Pens in Movies and TV

    Quote Originally Posted by kaisnowbird View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by dr.grace View Post
    I was trained by a real Chinese calligrapher and artist to hold the brush between the second and third fingers. It's basically the same way you hold chopsticks. It gives you both control and flexibility for various kinds of brush strokes. You don't need to hold it very far up the handle, except perhaps with a very large brush used for writing huge characters. Korean brush painting was originally derived from the Chinese art, but I don't know how far it's diverged since then.

    Of course, writing with a pen is different. People have various ways of holding pens in Asia, too. And, in filming the movie, they probably wanted the camera to have a good angle to see the writing in the journal, so that may be why this fellow held the pen so high.
    I agree with Dr Grace's comments.
    Below is the traditional way to hold a brush in Chinese, Japanese and Korean calligraphy. Although for a brush this size, people seldom hold the brush so high up. In any case, when writing with a brush, no part of the pen holding hand is supposed to touch the paper or the desk.
    Thanks for the illustration. I see what is meant by between second and third fingers. The calligrapher I saw mostly held the brush in a similar manner as depicted in the picture. I said modified tripod hold since the holding and manipulation of movement were done mostly done with first two fingers and the thumb. The third (or ring) finger was in play but it looked as if it were used more as a "brace" to help hold the brush upright, if that makes any sense. The barrel of the brush didn't touch the top or nail part of the finger but rather the tip of the finger. And he did hold the brush as high as depicted in the picture. Perhaps that was his particular individual variation on standard brush hold?
    Last edited by RNHC; June 8th, 2015 at 02:21 PM.

  18. #54
    Member newrisingsun64's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    47
    Thanks
    5
    Thanked 10 Times in 3 Posts
    Rep Power
    0

    Default Re: Fountain Pens in Movies and TV

    does anyone know the make and model of the fountain pen that is used in office space, one of the bobs always has one while doing interviews.

  19. #55
    Senior Member stonerman33's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    133
    Thanks
    8
    Thanked 54 Times in 22 Posts
    Rep Power
    0

    Default Re: Fountain Pens in Movies and TV


  20. #56
    Member newrisingsun64's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    47
    Thanks
    5
    Thanked 10 Times in 3 Posts
    Rep Power
    0

    Default Re: Fountain Pens in Movies and TV

    Quote Originally Posted by stonerman33 View Post
    Yes, what fountain pen is that?!! Does anyone have any idea?!

  21. #57
    Senior Member Scrawler's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    934
    Thanks
    688
    Thanked 899 Times in 411 Posts
    Rep Power
    6

    Default Re: Fountain Pens in Movies and TV

    I have been watching Torchwood for the past couple of weeks. In the episode I watched last night, Season 1 Episode 12 a couple of the protagonists are transported back in time to 1941 and the mathematician Toshiko Sato complains that she cannot use the fountain pen, with which she must record an important formula. I have no idea what the pen was, but we get a close up of the feed and see her murdering the nib by pressing as if it was a ball point.

  22. #58
    Senior Member dr.grace's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    208
    Thanks
    381
    Thanked 103 Times in 68 Posts
    Rep Power
    6

    Default Re: Fountain Pens in Movies and TV

    Quote Originally Posted by newrisingsun64 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by stonerman33 View Post
    Yes, what fountain pen is that?!! Does anyone have any idea?!
    It looks like a Pilot Metropolitan.

  23. #59
    Senior Member Zhivago's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    1,094
    Thanks
    301
    Thanked 77 Times in 51 Posts
    Rep Power
    8

    Default Re: Fountain Pens in Movies and TV

    Office Space came out in 1999. Was the Metropolitan around then under another name?

  24. #60
    Senior Member dr.grace's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    208
    Thanks
    381
    Thanked 103 Times in 68 Posts
    Rep Power
    6

    Default Re: Fountain Pens in Movies and TV

    Maybe it was the Pilot Knight.

    Edit: No, actually the Knight had a flat top. Maybe it was some other Pilot model??

    It could also look a bit like an Omas Ogiva, but I doubt they'd use that for a prop.
    Last edited by dr.grace; June 10th, 2015 at 09:37 PM.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •